The Latest: Pittsburgh to open hydrants to flush system

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Posted: Feb 01, 2017 7:14 PM
The Latest: Pittsburgh to open hydrants to flush system

PITTSBURGH (AP) — The Latest on problems with Pittsburgh's water supply (all times local):

7 p.m.

Pittsburgh officials say there's still no sign of contamination in the city's water supply, but some fire hydrants will be opened to help flush water from one city reservoir system that may not have been treated with sufficient chlorine.

The Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority says the effort is part of a requirement by state environmental officials to document that "water of concern" is being removed from the system.

Environmental officials also want assurances that the plant is not providing inadequately treated water and that water in the distribution system meets all concerns.

Officials have issued a boil-water advisory to 100,000 customers and have opened 15 water supply centers. They note that Pennsylvania water quality standards are more stringent than those of the federal government and even surrounding states.

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12:15 p.m.

Pittsburgh Public School officials say all schools will reopen Thursday after problems with the city's water supply forced 22 schools and two early childhood centers to close Wednesday.

City officials say they've now opened 15 supply centers across the city where residents can obtain bottled water or fill jugs from metal water buffalo tanks.

The city's water authority issued a boil-water advisory to 100,000 customers late Tuesday after state environmental tests showed insufficient chlorine in water being drawn from one city reservoir system.

That reservoir system has been taken offline, and the city is drawing water from other sources while they test the water for chlorine levels needed to satisfy the state.

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9:20 a.m.

A water treatment problem in Pittsburgh has led to the closure of nearly two dozen schools and a boil-water order for 100,000 customers.

The Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority says the water doesn't have enough chlorine. Officials say that could enable giardia, a parasite that causes severe diarrhea, to grow.

The low chlorine level was discovered by state environmental officials. They have been testing the city's water as part of an ongoing investigation into its water treatment system.

The problem prompted Pittsburgh Public Schools to close 22 schools and two early childhood centers on Wednesday.

The advisory was expected to last up to three days. The city is setting up water buffaloes and other distribution points where residents can get bottled water.