Ex-Florida Gov. Crist aims for political comeback in House

AP News
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Posted: Nov 03, 2016 4:52 AM
Ex-Florida Gov. Crist aims for political comeback in House

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — It's a sunny fall day at Williams Park in downtown St. Petersburg, and Charlie Crist is in his element.

"What's your name," he purrs to a woman in a wheelchair, taking her hand. He beams a white smile that matches his snow-white hair, contrasting with his tan face. "May I get a picture?" he asks, bending down on one knee. The woman giggles.

Crist, a Republican-turned-independent-turned-Democrat, is a former governor, former state attorney general and was on the short list to be Sen. John McCain's vice presidential running mate in 2008. This year, he's setting his sights on a seat in the U.S. House.

Democrats are counting on Crist and other candidates to make significant inroads into the Republicans' commanding House majority. Florida offers at least three potential Democratic gains as the party tries to cobble together a 30-seat pickup.

Crist, a 60-year-old lawyer, faces Republican incumbent U.S. Rep. David Jolly. The race may be one of the few nationally in which the Republican candidate is using Donald Trump against the Democrat, noting that Trump helped Crist raise money when he was with the GOP.

"It's a crazy year," Crist says.

He hopes it's his year.

Crist has the hometown advantage — he was raised in St. Petersburg — and is running in a redrawn district that includes more African-Americans.

Jolly, who has represented the 13th Congressional District since 2014, is hoping Crist's complicated political past will make him vulnerable.

"The fundamental issue is trust. Everybody knows Charlie, they know he's been on every side of the issue," Jolly says. "By most polls, this will be a neck and neck race."

A recent poll by St. Pete Polls shows Crist with a narrow lead, while another tally by the Public Opinion Research Laboratory at the University of North Florida shows Crist leading Jolly 54 percent to 36.

Crist, who was governor from 2007 to 2011, ran for Senate as a Republican in 2010 but lost to Marco Rubio in the primary. Crist quit the Republican Party, ran in the general election as an independent and lost. He switched party affiliation again, becoming a Democrat, and ran unsuccessfully for governor against Rick Scott in 2014.

The 43-year-old Jolly has his own complications. He earlier had announced he would run for U.S. Senate, but when Rubio dropped out of the presidential race and said he would run for re-election, Jolly got out of that race.

Jolly says his biggest accomplishments are taking on campaign finance reform and backing a bill that would prohibit members of Congress from directly soliciting campaign contributions.

Jolly set himself apart from many Republicans by refusing to fundraise for the national party while working in Washington. And he refuses to endorse Trump.

"I've been fully abandoned by the Republican Party," Jolly said. Still, he's done pretty well with fundraising; as of Sept. 30, he's raised $1.75 million to Crist's $1.4 million. But Crist is getting help from the Democratic Party and other political action committees.

And Trump has become another flashpoint in the campaign.

In September, Jolly released a video that says Trump helped Crist raise money several times when Crist was a Republican.

And the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee aired television ads using doctored photos to make it appear Jolly and Trump are pals. Only this week did Crist denounce the ad.

That negative ad turned some Crist voters off.

"I may end up voting for Jolly out of spite for the Democrats putting out negative information," said Joe Jordan, a 36-year-old IT professional.

Crist touts his record on education, the economy and the environment, and says he supports a woman's right to choose.

In the St. Petersburg park, he smiles at Velva Lee Heraty and her miniature Shih Tzu. Heraty shows him photos of when he walked little Miss Nena outside a cafe.

"That was two years ago," Heraty says.

Crist gives her a serious look. That's when Gov. Scott defeated him by a single percentage point.

"Two years ago. We're hoping for a better result this time," Crist says.

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Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush