The Latest: Labour member pens personal rebuke to Corbyn

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Posted: Jun 26, 2016 7:49 AM
The Latest: Labour member pens personal rebuke to Corbyn

LONDON (AP) — The Latest on Britain's historic vote to leave the European Union (all times local):

12:50 p.m.

Former British shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander's resignation letter reads as a personal rebuke to Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

The letter released Sunday marks the start of an open revolt against Corbyn's leadership role following Britain's vote to leave the European Union. Senior party figures are trying to pressure him to resign.

Alexander writes: "I do not believe you have the capacity to shape the answers our country is demanding and I believe that if we are to form the next government, a change of leadership is essential."

She says Britain needs an "effective opposition" at a time of unprecedented challenges.

Other members of the Labour Party's shadow cabinet have also resigned to protest Corbyn's performance as leader.

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12:20 p.m.

British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn faces a revolt from some of his party's legislators but seems to still have labor union backing.

Unite union representative Jennie Formby said Sunday that it is "nonsense" to blame Corbyn for Britain's surprising vote to leave the EU.

She sits on the Labour Party's National Executive Committee and called for lawmakers to show unity rather than challenge Corbyn's leadership.

Formby said party members have been calling her to express support for Corbyn, who became party leader in September.

"The timing of this is appalling" she says of the public challenge to Corbyn's leadership.

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12:05 p.m.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has suggested the Scottish Parliament could be able to keep Britain from leaving the European Union.

She told BBC Sunday that she would ask the Scottish Parliament not to give "legislative consent" to removing Britain from the EU.

Scots voted against leaving the EU in Thursday's referendum and Sturgeon is looking for ways to keep that from happening.

Her Scottish National Party doesn't have an outright majority in parliament despite the popularity of its pro-independence stance.

She said she believes the consent of the Scottish Parliament would be needed for Britain to leave but concedes the British government would probably take a "very different view" on the question.

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11:15 a.m.

Hungary's prime minister says the European Union is "disorderly" and needs to be changed in light of Britain's decision to leave the bloc.

Viktor Orban, who has often clashed with Brussels, said Sunday the British wanted to leave the EU because they had enough of "uncertainty, paralysis ... of slowly being unable to feel at home in Europe."

Orban spoke at a swearing-in ceremony of new graduates of the National University of Public Service.

He said the EU is "quickly going to change" and that "countries which remain orderly and can guarantee security and lawfulness for their citizens will be at an advantage."

Orban last year built razor-wire fences to stem the flow of migrants passing through Hungary.

He said the British "decided that they will once again take control of their destiny" as "many European leaders do not undertake the struggle against the new people's migration and the invading, illegal and malfeasant migration flow."

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10:50 a.m.

A senior figure of the British Labour Party says embattled party leader Jeremy Corbyn won't step down despite internal opposition.

John McDonnell told the BBC Sunday that "Jeremy's not going anywhere."

McDonnell is the party's shadow chancellor and a top adviser to Corbyn.

He says Corbyn was elected party leader nine months ago with "the biggest mandate of any political leader in our country."

He says Corbyn still enjoys wide party backing from the rank and file members who voted him in.

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10:30 a.m.

European Parliament President Martin Schulz wants Britain to officially apply for an exit from the European Union already by Tuesday, following its vote to leave the bloc.

Schulz told weekly Bild am Sonntag Sunday that "we now expect the British government to deliver. The summit on Tuesday is the right moment for this."

Top EU officials have repeatedly pressed Britain for a quick exit to avoid a period of uncertainty for the remaining 27 EU countries.

The victorious "leave" campaigners in Britain have said there's no rush to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, which will begin a two-year exit process to renegotiate trade, business and political links between the U.K. and the EU.

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8:50 a.m.

Britain's shadow health secretary has resigned from the shadow cabinet amid a dispute over Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn's leadership in the aftermath of Britain's vote to leave the European Union.

The Press Association reported Heidi Alexander announced her resignation Sunday, shortly after Corbyn fired shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn.

The BBC reports that up to half of the shadow cabinet is set to resign in a bid to force Corbyn to step down.

The opposition leader has faced accusations from his own lawmakers that he led a weak campaign in Britain's EU referendum and is facing a motion of no confidence.

The Observer newspaper reported Sunday that Benn has been plotting against Corbyn.

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8:40 a.m.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will visit Brussels and London on Monday as the world grapples with the implications of Britain's historic vote to leave the European Union.

Kerry will bring messages of American support to both places Monday.

In Brussels, he will meet the 28-nation bloc's foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini. In Britain, he will see Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond.

Kerry arrived in Rome on Sunday for scheduled talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

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8:30 a.m.

British Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn has fired his shadow foreign secretary amid a dispute over his leadership in the aftermath of Britain's vote to leave the European Union.

Hilary Benn told the Press Association Sunday that Corbyn dismissed him after he told him he had lost confidence in his ability to lead the party.

Benn said that "following the result of the EU referendum, we need strong and effective leadership of the Labour Party that is capable of winning public support."

The dismissal follows claims in the Observer newspaper that Benn was plotting against Corbyn.

The opposition leader has faced accusations from his own lawmakers that he led a weak campaign in Britain's EU referendum and is facing a motion of no confidence.