The Latest: Witness: Hubbard wouldn't do anything unethical

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Posted: Jun 03, 2016 4:05 PM
The Latest: Witness: Hubbard wouldn't do anything unethical

OPELIKA, Ala. (AP) — The Latest on the ethics trial of Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard (all times local):

2:50 p.m.

A prosecution witness said she doesn't think Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard would "ever, ever knowingly do something unethical or dishonest."

Minda Riley Campbell, the daughter of former Gov. Bob Riley, gave what amounted to a brief monologue Friday afternoon at the end of her testimony in Hubbard's ethics trial. Campbell, with the judge's permission, insisted on speaking after a prosecutor had cut off her lengthy responses and told her she would have a chance later to say whatever she wanted.

The unusual character reference came after Campbell had endured three hours of tense questioning by prosecutor Matt Hart.

Campbell testified earlier that Hubbard asked for her help finding employment.

Riley is expected to testify this afternoon.

Hubbard is charged with using his political positions for personal gain.

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11:17 a.m.

The daughter of former Alabama Gov. Bob Riley says House Speaker Mike Hubbard asked her for help finding a job.

Lobbyist Minda Riley Campbell testified Friday that Hubbard asked if she knew of any work that would be a "good fit" for him. Campbell, under questioning by a state prosecutor, also testified that Hubbard communicated "pretty clearly" that he wanted to come work at her father's high-profile lobbying firm.

Hubbard is on trial for ethics charges accusing him of using his political positions to steer business to his companies and solicit employment and financial favors from lobbyists. Hubbard says he is innocent.

Campbell, whose family has a long association with Hubbard, repeatedly interjected that Hubbard was a friend and talented.

Bob Riley is expected to testify later Friday.

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10 a.m.

The head of an influential business group says he set up meetings with out-of-state corporate officials to try to help Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard find a job.

Business Council of Alabama President Billy Canary testified Friday that he was trying to see "what opportunities might be available" for Hubbard.

Hubbard is on trial for ethics charges accusing him of using his political positions to solicit employment and financial favors from lobbyists.

Canary, a close political ally of Hubbard's, was one of three lobbyists who had weekly meetings with the speaker about upcoming legislation. Canary also described Hubbard as a friend.

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8:45 a.m.

Former Alabama Gov. Bob Riley has arrived at the courthouse for expected testimony in the ethics trial of Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard.

Prosecutors have accused Hubbard of trying to improperly solicit Riley, who became a lobbyist, for work and help finding new business clients. His daughter, Minda Riley Campbell, is also expected to testify.

The former governor is expected to be a reluctant prosecution witness. Hubbard has described Riley as a political mentor and named one of his sons after the former governor. Prosecutors are expected to ask Riley about emails Hubbard sent about his need for employment.

Hubbard faces 23 ethics charges accusing him of using his positions as GOP party chairman and house speaker to try to generate $2.3 million in work and investments for his companies. Hubbard says he is innocent.

3:38 a.m.

Testimony resumes Friday in the ethics trial of Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard.

Prosecutors have accused Hubbard of using his positions as GOP party chairman and house speaker to generate $2.3 million in work and investments for his companies.

Hubbard has maintained his innocence and argued the transactions were within the bounds of the state ethics law that includes exemptions for normal business dealings and longstanding friendships.

Hubbard would be removed from office automatically if convicted on even one of 23 charges accusing him of using his political positions for personal financial gain.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley testified earlier this week about meetings he had with Hubbard on economic development projects that could have indirectly benefited Hubbard's business clients.