The Latest: San Francisco sanctuary vote postponed

AP News
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Posted: May 10, 2016 8:32 PM
The Latest: San Francisco sanctuary vote postponed

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Latest on sanctuary protections in San Francisco (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

The sponsor of a proposal limiting when law enforcement in san Francisco can cooperate with federal immigration authorities says he will postpone a vote on the issue.

Supervisor John Avalos said he did not want the Board of Supervisors to decide the sanctuary city question on Tuesday without support from Sheriff Vicki Hennessy.

Hennessy is opposed to the proposal that directs law officers to notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement only if the person detained is charged with a violent crime and has been convicted of a violent crime within the last seven years.

Hennessy wants more discretion to decide when her deputies can talk to federal immigration officials.

The proposal comes after the July shooting death of a 32-year-old woman walking along a pier, which set off a national debate over sanctuary-city protections offered by San Francisco and other cities.

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2:35 p.m.

San Francisco supervisors recessed briefly after protesters calling for the removal of the police chief disrupted the board as it prepared to discuss how to handle criminal suspects in the country illegally.

Mayor Ed Lee was explaining Tuesday to the Board of Supervisors what he is doing to improve police relations with minority communities when a protester stood up to demand the firing of Police Chief Greg Suhr.

Others in the audience took up the chant and ignored requests to be quiet. Deputies escorted at least three people out of the chamber.

The meeting comes after the July shooting death of a 32-year-old woman walking along a pier, which set off a national debate over sanctuary-city protections offered by San Francisco and other cities.

Activists have been converging on City Hall in recent months, protesting police conduct. Last week, protesters shut down the meeting for nearly two hours.

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2 p.m.

Nearly a year after a shooting death along a San Francisco pier sparked a national debate on how the city handles criminal suspects in the country illegally, the city's leaders are considering a proposal that would clarify the guidelines under which its employees could contact federal deportation authorities.

On Tuesday, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors could approve a proposed ordinance that directs law officers to notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement only if the person detained is charged with a violent crime and has been convicted of a violent crime within the last seven years.

The vote comes after the shooting death of a 32-year-old woman walking along a pier, which set off a national debate over sanctuary-city protections that San Francisco and other cities offer.

Sheriff Vicki Hennessy opposes the legislation, saying she should have discretion about whether to notify federal immigration officials.