The Latest: Detroit teachers say they will return to work

AP News
|
Posted: May 03, 2016 6:34 PM
The Latest: Detroit teachers say they will return to work

DETROIT (AP) — The Latest on the sick-out by teachers that's closed dozens of Detroit schools on Tuesday (all times local):

6:30 p.m.

Detroit teachers say they will return to the classroom Wednesday after most schools were closed for two straight days because faculty called out sick.

The Detroit Federation of Teachers announced the end of the protest after the district's state-appointed transitional manager, Steven Rhodes, offered assurance "that they will be paid for their work." Union leaders encouraged members to go back to school.

The district is projected to run out of cash by June 30. Without money from the state, teachers who have opted to receive their pay over 12 months instead of the course of the school year will not get checks this summer.

State lawmakers are working on plans to restructure Detroit's ailing school district.

About 45,000 Detroit students missed class Monday and Tuesday.

___

1 p.m.

A Michigan legislative committee has approved a $500 million plan to restructure Detroit's ailing school district by paying off enormous operating debt and creating a new district.

The bills winning passage Tuesday next head to the floor of the Republican-led House, which could vote on them later this week. The new bills differ from a bipartisan $720 million plan approved by the Senate in March. The Senate and House will have to work out their differences to advance the measure before the Legislature adjourns in June.

The committee's Republican chairman Al Pscholka (pa-SHOLKA) has promised that teachers will be paid and lawmakers will fix the state-managed district's finances.

Teachers concerned they would not be paid this summer held a second sick-out Tuesday, forcing the closure of 94 schools.

___

10:55 a.m.

A top Republican lawmaker says Detroit teachers will get paid and that lawmakers have never indicated they won't solve the district's financial problems.

State House Appropriations Committee Chairman Al Pscholka (pa-SHOLKA) told a hearing Tuesday that it's "time for us to act." Pscholka says it doesn't matter who's to blame for the state-managed district's long-lasting problems, but that "the future of Detroit's schoolchildren ... is on the line."

The state Legislature passed $48.7 million in emergency funding in March, but that will only last through June. Teachers held another mass sick-out Tuesday, forcing the closure of 94 schools, over concerns they will not be paid this summer.

Gov. Rick Snyder proposed overhauling the Detroit Public Schools a year ago, but legislators are at odds over issues such as charter schools, labor contracts and how quickly an elected school board takes power.

___

10:15 a.m.

Michigan lawmakers facing pressure to rescue Detroit's state-managed school district are at odds over how much to spend and other details.

A state House committee is considering a $500 million restructuring plan Tuesday, as students missed class for a second straight day after teachers called out sick over fears they will not be paid this summer. The bailout is less than a $720 million proposal approved by the state Senate in March.

Unlike the Senate legislation, the House bills would limit employees' bargaining rights and prohibit labor contracts in place in the current district from being transferred when a new district is launched.

8:45 a.m.

About 45,000 Detroit Public Schools students are missing class for the second straight day after teachers called out sick over pay issues.

That has forced some parents to skip work or find someone else to watch their children.

Monique Baker McCormick's daughter is an 11th grader at Cass Tech.

She says her daughter is missing out on learning, but that the district's teachers shouldn't be blamed for "just trying to survive themselves off of what little they get."

The state-appointed transition manager for Detroit Schools has said the district is projected to run out of cash by June 30. Teachers who have opted to receive their pay over 12 months instead of the course of the school year will not get checks this summer without help from the state.

___

7:30 a.m.

Nearly all Detroit public schools are closed as mass teacher sick-outs over pay roll into a second day.

The district released a list of 94 closed schools as of 7:15 a.m. Tuesday.

Detroit Federation of Teachers president Ivy Bailey said in an email Monday night that educators are not expected to show up for work Tuesday.

The district is projected to run out of cash by June 30. Without funds from the state, teachers who have opted to receive their pay over 12 months instead of the course of the school year will not get checks this summer.

More than 1,500 teachers called out sick Monday, forcing 94 of 97 schools to close. More than 45,000 students missed class.

Another protest and a union meeting are planned Tuesday.