The Latest: Advocates: Court shuts down $15 wage challenges

AP News
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Posted: May 02, 2016 4:12 PM

SEATTLE (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. Supreme Court turning away a challenge to Seattle's $15-an-hour minimum wage (all times local):

12:30 p.m.

Worker advocates say the U.S. Supreme Court refusing to hear a challenge of Seattle's $15-an-hour minimum wage is a signal it will not be commenting on the laws that other cities and states are passing.

The Seattle law is the first to reach the nation's highest court, which announced Monday that it wouldn't hear the challenge.

An official at the National Employment Law Project says several other cases against local minimum wage laws are before state courts, but no other cases are on their way to the Supreme Court at this time.

Seattle was one of the first cities to adopt a law aiming for a $15 minimum wage.

The International Franchise Association and five franchises sued the city, saying the new law discriminates against them by treating Seattle's 623 franchises like large businesses because they are part of multistate networks.

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9 a.m.

An organization of franchise business owners is disappointed that the U.S. Supreme Court won't hear a challenge to Seattle's $15-an-hour minimum wage law.

The International Franchise Association and five franchises sued the city, saying the new law discriminates against them by treating Seattle's 623 franchises like large businesses because they are part of multistate networks.

But the franchises say they are small businesses. The association says it's still deciding what its next steps will be.

The justices didn't comment on their order Monday that leaves in place a federal court ruling in favor of Seattle.

The law that went into effect last year gives small businesses seven years to phase in the higher wage, but requires large companies and franchises to meet the $15 target by 2017 or 2018.

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6:41 a.m.

The Supreme Court is turning away a challenge to Seattle's $15 an hour minimum wage from franchise business owners who say the law discriminates against them.

The justices are not commenting on their order Monday that leaves in place a federal court ruling in favor of Seattle.

Five franchises and the International Franchise Association said the law treats Seattle's 623 franchises like large businesses because they are part of multi-state networks. But in reality, the franchises say, they are small businesses and should have more time to phase in the higher hourly wage minimum.

Small businesses employing fewer than 500 people have seven years to phase in the $15 hourly wage, while large employers must do so over three years.