The Latest: Trump gripes about "corrupt" nomination system

AP News
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Posted: Apr 10, 2016 4:11 PM
The Latest: Trump gripes about "corrupt" nomination system

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the 2016 presidential campaign (all times Eastern Daylight Time):

4:07 p.m.

Donald Trump is blasting a "corrupt" election system for complicating his path to the Republican nomination.

Trump tells a crowd of thousands of enthusiastic supporters gathered in a frigid airport hangar in Rochester, New York on Sunday afternoon that "it's not right" that the person who wins the most votes may not be the nominee.

He says he's doing fine, but if he's denied the nomination, "you're going to have a big problem, folks."

While Trump has won more states than any of his Republican rivals, it's possible that he won't secure the 1,237 delegates needed to win the nomination before the summer convention.

Rival Ted Cruz has been out-maneuvering him at local and state gatherings where delegates are being chosen. Trump recently hired Paul Manafort to craft a strategy to win more delegates.

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3:10 p.m.

A handful of Bernie Sanders supporters are protesting Hillary Clinton in Baltimore on Sunday.

The small group held up a sign reading: "Clinton: What about mass incarceration" and chanted "super predator." As they were escorted out of the campaign rally by police, the activists chanted "Feel The Bern."

Both Clinton and her husband, former president Bill Clinton, have been repeatedly protested for their support for the 1994 crime bill — a signature achievement of her husband's administration. On Friday, Bill Clinton offered a near apology for a contentious confrontation with some protesters at a Philadelphia campaign rally.

They've both said they regret the bill because it contributed to high incarceration rates of black people for nonviolent crimes, like minor drug offenses. Sanders, then a congressman, also backed the legislation.

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3:06 p.m.

Bernie Sanders is riling up hundreds of supporters at Coney Island, telling them he's listening to their voices instead of "hustling money" on Wall Street and from billionaires.

It was a dig at Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. Sanders has been widely critical of her ties to Wall Street.

Delivering remarks in front of the Thunderbolt roller coaster, Sanders is reminiscing about visiting the amusement park as a child. He jokes that he "ate half the hot dogs" at the park.

Hundreds more supporters are lined up on the beach near the event to here Sanders remarks. His Sunday rally concludes a three-day, seven-stop swing through New York City. He'll head to Upstate New York to campaign on Monday morning.

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3:03 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is bringing some local appeal to her Baltimore campaign rally.

The Democratic presidential candidate picked up the endorsement of Rep. Elijah Cummings, who had remained neutral for months because of his role as the top Democrat on the House Committee overseeing the Benghazi investigation.

Cummings thanked Sen. Bernie Sanders, Clinton's rival for the Democratic presidential nomination. "But Bernie," Cummings added, "I know Hillary Clinton."

Clinton has received the endorsement of every member of the Maryland congressional delegation. Polls show her with a double digit lead in the state, which votes April 26.

Addressing supporters in City Garage, a bus parking lot that has been transformed into a manufacturing incubator, Clinton promised to direct "hundreds of billions of dollars to places like West and East Baltimore. "

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1:00 p.m.

During his tour of three historic black churches in Harlem on Sunday, Bill Clinton acknowledged that his administration "overdid it" with the 1994 crime bill, putting too many nonviolent offenders behind bars for long sentences. But he compensated by pushing for the release of some girlfriends of drug dealers earlier than their original harsh sentences, he told the congregation at Antioch Baptist Church.

The former president has drawn the wrath of the Black Lives Matter movement who say the bill resulted in a disproportionate number of African-Americans serving prison time.

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12:15 p.m.

Bill Clinton told a Harlem congregation that as president, his wife would lift some of the economic barriers that keep many stuck in low-wage jobs.

The former Democratic president spoke Sunday at the Antioch Baptist Church. He was accompanied by Rep. Charles Rangel, who Clinton said had helped him to put more police on crime-ridden Harlem streets.

Clinton said that the next president would have to rebuild people's trust in government, instead of what he called today's political "screaming and yelling."

He implored Harlem residents to again vote for Hillary Clinton. He said that as a Democratic senator from New York, she already had fought for their economic and health care equality.

The Antioch church was one of three in Harlem that Bill Clinton visited on Sunday.

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10:55 a.m.

Republicans seem to be on their way to preparing for a contested convention this summer — based on the belief that no candidate may clinch the nomination with enough delegates before them.

Does Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton envision that scenario?

"No," she makes clear to CNN's "State of the Union."

"I intend to have the number of delegates that are required to be nominated."

To date, Clinton has 1,287 delegates based on primaries and caucuses to Bernie Sanders' 1,037.

When including superdelegates — those are party officials who can back any candidate — Clinton has 1,756, or 74 percent of the number needed to clinch the nomination. Sanders has 1,068.

Sanders has been on a winning streak in state contests, but Clinton is confident about the New York primary April 19 and later votes.

And she's hoping for a "unified" party so Democrats can turn their focus toward the eventual GOP nominee.

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10:15 a.m.

President Barack Obama says "America's got the best cards" and is the "envy of the world," but he worries that political divisions could hold back the country.

He tells "Fox News Sunday" that "this can be our century, just like the 20th century was — as long as we don't tear each other apart." The two-term Democratic president — who leaves office in January — says that's because American politics "value sensationalism or conflict over cooperation, and we don't have the ability to compromise."

Obama says that "if we get that part right, nobody can stop us."

He says that increasingly Democrats and Republicans "don't hear each other" and he hopes the political dynamic can change.

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9:50 a.m.

John Kasich (KAY'-sihk) is painting a gloomy picture for Republicans on all levels if either Donald Trump or Ted Cruz is the party's presidential nominee in November.

The Ohio governor is citing "great concern" in the party — and not just about the White House race, but what happens if "we get blown out" in that contest.

Under that scenario, Kasich tells CBS' "Face the Nation" that "we would lose seats all the way from the statehouse to the courthouse" — meaning races all down the ballot.

He thinks that'll be "a big consideration" at the GOP convention this summer. Kasich's hope for the nomination is based on the idea that no candidate wraps up enough delegates before the convention — and that he can emerge there.

Bill Clinton told a Harlem congregation that as president, his wife would lift some of the economic barriers that keep many stuck in low-wage jobs.

The former Democratic president spoke Sunday at the Antioch Baptist Church. He was accompanied by Rep. Charles Rangel, who Clinton said had helped him to put more police on crime-ridden Harlem streets.

Clinton said that the next president would have to rebuild people's trust in government - instead of what he called today's political "screaming and yelling."

He implored Harlem residents to again vote for Hillary Clinton. He said that as a Democratic senator from New York, she already had fought for their economic and health care equality.

The Antioch church was one of three in Harlem that Bill Clinton visited on Sunday.