The Latest: Rep. Young to stay on Indiana US Senate ballot

AP News
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Posted: Feb 19, 2016 5:41 PM

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Latest on challenge seeking to remove U.S. Rep. Todd Young from the Indiana Republican primary ballot for U.S. Senate. (all times local):

5:40 p.m.

Republican U.S. Rep. Todd Young's name will stay on the ballot for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat after a tie vote by the state election commission.

The board voted 2-2 along party lines Friday after hearing arguments from attorneys for the state Democratic Party and tea party-backed GOP Rep. Marlin Stutzman that Young's campaign didn't submit enough petition signatures to meet state requirements to appear on the May primary ballot.

Republican board members said they believed Young's campaign relied in good faith on counts of petition signatures submitted by county clerks and that they didn't want to disenfranchise voters.

Democratic members said they believed Young didn't meet the state's requirements.

2:50 p.m.

The Indiana Election Commission is hearing arguments over whether Republican U.S. Rep. Todd Young's name can stay on the ballot for the state's open U.S. Senate seat.

The state Democratic Party and tea party-backed GOP Rep. Marlin Stutzman contend Young's candidacy paperwork was three voter signatures shy of meeting a state requirement for him to appear on the May primary ballot.

Young's campaign has dismissed the challenge as a "political stunt."

Young will stay on the Indiana ballot unless three of the bi-partisan commission's four members vote to remove him. But any decision from the hearing can also be challenged in court.

If Young is removed, Stutzman would be the only GOP candidate left in the field to replace retiring Republican Sen. Dan Coats.

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8:45 a.m.

The Indiana Election Commission is set to hear a challenge to U.S. Rep. Todd Young's place on the ballot for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat.

State law requires Senate candidates to submit signatures from 500 registered voters from each of Indiana's nine congressional districts to qualify for the May primary ballot.

The state Election Division reported Young had 501 signatures in the 1st Congressional District, but state Democrats say he was actually two short. An Associated Press analysis of Young's petitions found he was three signatures short.

Young will stay on the Indiana ballot unless three of the four commission members vote to remove him.

Any decision from the hearing can also be challenged in court.