Religion news in brief

AP News
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Posted: Dec 02, 2015 1:01 PM
Religion news in brief

Bush says Christian refugees need special consideration

WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush says the U.S. should be more open to admitting Christian refugees from Iraq and Syria because of the persecution they face.

At a town hall meeting in Iowa Tuesday, Bush said Christians in areas controlled by the Islamic State group face rape, slavery and beheading, and even those who escape to refugee camps are often persecuted by the majority of refugees who are Muslim.

Bush said there's nothing un-American about considering the religion of refugees seeking asylum in the United States, noting that religious persecution is one of the factors listed for consideration under U.S. law.

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Clinton commemorates boycott, says US must address injustice

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Standing in the Alabama pulpit where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led the historic Montgomery bus boycott, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has told black voters that the U.S. is still plagued by injustice.

She charged that blacks today suffer from attempts to roll back voting rights, from an epidemic of gun violence and from mass incarceration.

Clinton's speech Tuesday at the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church fell on the anniversary of Rosa Parks' Dec. 1, 1955, arrest for refusing to give her bus seat to a white passenger. Parks' arrest sparked the 381-day boycott of Montgomery buses by blacks to protest segregated seating.

A crowd filled the church ahead of Clinton's speech. A line stretched down the block for the limited seating in the historic church that holds 350 people.

The Rev. Bernice King gave Tuesday's benediction at the church where her father preached his Sunday sermons from 1954 to 1960.

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Trump meets with black pastors at Trump Tower

NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump says his New York meeting at Trump tower with a group of black pastors was "amazing" and resulted in "lots of good ideas."

But there was no group endorsement as the campaign had signaled last week.

The meeting was organized with the help of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, pastor Darrell Scott, who heads New Spirit Revival Center. Scott, a Trump supporter, says more than 100 pastors had what he called "a wonderful time."

But both Scott and Trump declined to say how many plan to make endorsements. Scott said some had "to go pray about it." Some of the ministers, who have been criticized for attending the meet-and-greet, said they were surprised when it was billed as a Trump endorsement.

Trump has drawn criticism recently for retweeting an image of inaccurate statistics that vastly overrepresented the number of whites killed by blacks, among other errors. Scott blames the "liberal media" for depicting Trump in a way that he knows not to be true.

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Judge delays federal trial in Charleston church shooting

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — A federal judge has again delayed a trial for a man accused of shooting and killing nine people at a church in South Carolina.

Defense attorney David Bruck said Tuesday that attorneys are still reviewing evidence against Dylann Roof, who faces dozens of federal charges in the slayings of parishioners at Charleston's Emanuel AME Church during a Bible study in June.

U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel had moved the trial from October until January. Tuesday, he postponed the trial again, without setting a date.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Jay Richardson said there's been no decision from the U.S. Justice department on whether to seek the death penalty if Roof is convicted.

The state is seeking the death penalty, and the state prosecutor handling murder charges against Roof has told Gergel she wants to prosecute the case first.

That trial is set for July.

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For gays under IS rule, isolation and fear of a cruel death

REYHANLI, Turkey (AP) — Notorious for their gruesome methods of killing, the Islamic State group reserves one of its most brutal executions for suspected homosexuals.

Videos it has released show masked militants dangling men over the precipices of buildings by their legs to drop them head-first or tossing them over the edge.

By doing so, the Islamic State group aims to show radicals that it is unflinchingly carrying out the strictest form of Islam.

Islamic State group fighters also sometimes torture suspected homosexuals to reveal their friends' names and search their laptops and mobile phones.

The fear of a horrific death among gay men is further compounded by their isolation. Many Muslims consider homosexuality to be sinful, and gay men are haunted constantly by the possibility that someone, perhaps even a relative, will betray them to the militants.

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