The Latest: Feds reject releasing video of fatal shooting

AP News
|
Posted: Nov 20, 2015 9:42 PM
The Latest: Feds reject releasing video of fatal shooting

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The latest in the investigation into the fatal shooting of a black man by Minneapolis police that has sparked days of demonstrations (all times local):

8:15 p.m.

Federal authorities say releasing videos from the fatal shooting of a black man by a Minneapolis police officer would harm the investigation.

In a joint statement Friday night, they backed up state and local investigators who have rebuffed protesters demands for the release of videos of the shooting of 24-year-old Jamar Clark on Sunday.

The statement came from U.S. Attorney Andy Luger; the assistant attorney general for civil rights, Vanita Gupta; and the special agent in charge of the FBI's Minneapolis office, Richard Thornton.

They say release of any information, including any video, would be "extremely detrimental" to the independent investigation that the Justice Department and FBI are conducting into whether Clark's death violated any federal laws.

The federal investigation was also one of the protesters' demands.

___

5:30 p.m.

Hundreds are gathered outside a Minneapolis police precinct to remember a black man who was fatally shot by an officer.

The vigil was peaceful on Friday evening. Several speakers are calling for unity and justice in the wake of Sunday's shooting of 24-year-old Jamar Clark.

Many attendees are holding candles, and several children are sitting on their parents' shoulders, taking in the event on a cold night. Several bonfires have been lit in the area, filling the air with smoke.

Clark was shot Sunday after authorities say he struggled with an officer. Some community members allege Clark was handcuffed. Police dispute that.

___

5:25 p.m.

Gov. Mark Dayton says he had a constructive meeting with state and local leaders as well as leaders from the NAACP to talk about the situation in Minneapolis after the fatal shooting of 24-year-old Jamar Clark.

Dayton met Friday with Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, national and local leaders of the NAACP, the commissioner of the Department of Public Safety, and other officials. Clark was fatally shot Sunday by a Minneapolis police officer, and his death has sparked days of protests at the local police precinct.

Dayton says he is asking those who are grieving to behave in ways that don't cause further damage to people's lives and property. He says he takes the issue seriously and wants to bring proposals up during the next legislative session.

___

11:30 a.m.

Three activists were escorted from a Minneapolis City Council meeting after speaking out about the shooting of a black man by a city police officer.

Michelle Gross of Communities United Against Police Brutality was one of the activists removed from Friday's meeting. As she was escorted out, she shouted, "We will be heard. You will be held accountable for what you have done to our community."

Gross and others were speaking out about the fatal shooting of 24-year-old Jamar Clark. He was shot by a police officer in what authorities say was a scuffle. Some community members allege Clark was handcuffed. Police dispute that.

The activists were advised that the public is welcome to attend City Council meetings, but rules require those in attendance to refrain from disruptions.

___

6:25 a.m.

The nation's oldest civil rights organization is calling for a candlelight vigil and march in Minneapolis to bring attention to the latest fatal shooting of a young black man by a police officer.

NAACP national president Cornell William Brooks says the event planned for 4:30 p.m. Friday outside the 4th Precinct headquarters will increase pressure on the Minneapolis Police Department in the wake of the killing of 24-year-old Jamar Clark on Sunday.

Clark was fatally wounded in what police say was a scuffle with officers responding to an assault. Some community members allege Clark was handcuffed. Police dispute that.

The shooting has prompted protests. Brooks told reporters Thursday that Clark's death "is one bad chapter in a bad national narrative of police conduct."