10 Things to Know for Today

AP News
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Posted: Mar 13, 2015 9:59 AM
10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. HOW UKRAINIAN KIDS HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY WAR

AP's Nataliya Vasilyeva finds that children orphaned or abandoned were then dumped by new families when Kiev stopped paying benefits to some foster families in rebel-held areas.

2. FREEDOM FROM JIHADIST GROUP COMES AT STEEP PRICE

In Iraq, a normal life away from the harsh dominion of the Islamic State group begins with newly-implemented departure taxes.

3. SWEDISH PROSECUTORS WILLING TO QUESTION JULIAN ASSANGE IN ECUADOREAN EMBASSY IN LONDON

The decision could break the stalemate in an almost five-year-old investigation into alleged sex crimes by the WikiLeaks founder.

4. TERROR GROUP HAS NEW ALLY

Islamic State militants accept a pledge of allegiance by the Nigerian-grown Boko Haram extremist group, which has been weakened by a multinational African force.

5. PEACEFUL PROTESTS RETURN TO FERGUSON

Demonstrators call for calm but vow to keep pushing for change a day after the shooting of two police officers heightened tensions in the St. Louis suburb.

6. FEDS SEEK NEW RULES ON COMPUTER ACCESS

The Justice Department is at odds with Google and privacy groups over its push to make it easier to locate and hack into computers in criminal investigations.

7. WHAT NASA IS DOING TO SOLVE MAGNETIC MYSTERY

The space agency launches four identical spacecraft on a billion-dollar mission to study the explosive give-and-take of the Earth and sun's magnetic fields.

8. KERRY ENCOURAGES FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN EGYPT

In a regional economic forum, however, the U.S. secretary of state did not promise any new military assistance.

9. WHERE THE PRESIDENT IS OFF TO NEXT

Obama pays a visit to the Veterans Affairs medical center in Phoenix, epicenter of the health care scandal that rocked the VA last year.

10. ALFRED NOBEL'S WILL, ASKING THAT A PRIZE BE AWARDED IN HIS NAME, IS DISPLAYED

The handwritten document from 1895 is shown at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm as part of the "Legacy" exhibition that opened Friday.