A look at potential Democratic contenders in 2016 race

AP News
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Posted: Feb 02, 2015 3:53 AM
A look at potential Democratic contenders in 2016 race

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unlike the active jockeying among Republicans thinking about running for president, there is little public action among the Democratic considering a White House bid. Here's a look at where they stand.

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HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON

The leading contender, Clinton is widely expected to announce a campaign in the coming months. She has maintained a low profile since mid-December. She has been meeting with advisers to plan for a potential campaign and has limited the number of coming public appearances; her next scheduled address is this month in California.

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JOE BIDEN

The vice president has said he will make a decision later in the spring or summer, but has taken few steps to build the foundation of a campaign structure.

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JIM WEBB

The former Virginia senator and Navy secretary announced an exploratory committee last year, but has done little publicly in recent weeks as he recovers from knee replacement surgery. He expects to make a decision in the spring.

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MARTIN O'MALLEY

The former Maryland governor has said he will need "a couple of months" to get his family settled after a move to a new home in Baltimore before deciding on a bid. O'Malley signed on with a speaking firm after leaving the governor's office and will be as a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University. He plans to return to the early voting states of South Carolina in late February and New Hampshire in mid-March.

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BERNIE SANDERS

The independent senator from Vermont is ramping up his activities as he decides whether to pursue a campaign. Sanders was returning to New Hampshire this weekend and has a four-day trip to Iowa planned for this month.

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ELIZABETH WARREN

The Massachusetts senator remains the subject of a draft movement by liberal activists but has repeatedly declined interest in running for president. She remains an influential voice within the Democratic party and has made clear she hopes to influence the 2016 debate, arguing that the economic benefits from the recovery have helped Wall Street instead of boosting wages for middle-class families.