Former senate contender Joe Miller embarks on speaking career

Reuters News
|
Posted: Mar 21, 2011 3:48 PM
Former senate contender Joe Miller embarks on speaking career

By Yereth Rosen

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - Joe Miller may have lost his bid to become Alaska's senator, but the Tea Party favorite has just won a chance to start a new career as a traveling speechmaker.

Miller, an attorney by trade, signed up with Twenty-First Century Speakers, a bureau representing political figures, sports stars, academic experts and other luminaries.

"I'm excited to be working with Twenty-First Century Speakers," he said in a statement.

"They have a wonderful reputation, and I'm anxious to be able to meet and speak with people around the country about the sort of change that I believe our nation must make to get back on track."

Miller has his first out-of-state gig -- an event in California with Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona, and Joe "The Plumber" Wurzelbacher, who shot to fame after a 2008 encounter with then presidential candidate Barack Obama.

Called "A Night With the Joe's," the event is scheduled next Thursday at the home of Hollywood director Mario Pellegrini, and is sponsored by an organization devoted to defeating President Barack Obama's re-election.

Miller's next scheduled speeches will be in April at events of the conservative Tea Party movement in Idaho and Kansas, he said in his statement.

He scored an upset victory in last year's Republican Senate primary, with the support of the California-based Tea Party Express and former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin.

But incumbent Senator Lisa Murkowski, a Republican criticized by Miller as too liberal, waged a write-in campaign and became the first person since 1954 to win a Senate election by that method.

After losing the race, Miller closed his Fairbanks, Alaska, law practice and has been pursuing other career options.

He served as a fill-in host on an Anchorage conservative talk-radio show and, like Palin, has maintained an active Facebook page to spread his political message.

(Editing by Alex Dobuzinskis and Jerry Norton)