Arianna Huffington wrote on her blog the other day that because right-leaning conservative authors always dominate the New York Times bestsellers lists, perhaps they should be given their own category--you know, so other books can have a chance to reach the coveted top spot. 

What a loony suggestion!  (And an ideological point really not surprising coming from a liberal.)  Conservative authors--including Glenn Beck, Michelle Malkin, Sarah Palin, etc.--are dominating the bestseller lists, but did Huffington ever think that maybe it's because people are (gasp!) reading them and enjoying them?  I'm sure she's especially annoyed that books by the devil himself--Mr. Glenn Beck--now top a record FOUR of the NYTimes' lists. 

Just because liberals can't write and apparently don't read, conservatives should have a seperate list to compete on?  Give me a break.

Via NewsBusters:
In a Nov. 9 entry on The Huffington Post...  they suggest a separate category altogether, not for political non-fiction, but conservative non-fiction.

"Should The New York Times create a separate bestseller list for conservative blockbusters?" the post said. "Think of the history: we have a children's bestseller list because of "Harry Potter" -- Harry was knocking adult books off the top spots on the hardcover fiction list so publishers complained. The same thing must be true for Beck, Palin, Cheney, Bush (George W. and Laura), Malkin and others. What do you think?"

HuffPo isn't the only liberal source bothered by right-wing literary success. Pundits like MSNBC's Chris Matthews have openly expressed aggravation over conservatives dominating the list. However, the Huffington Post novel solution of "if you can't beat them, put them on their own list," seems to be a sign the left has given up on its own ability to sell hardcover non-fiction.

What's more, conservatives are selling books without the usual push best selling authors get from other media. A recent study by the Media Research Center's Culture & Media Institute found that most of the conservative books that appeared on the list often went unnoticed or unmentioned by the networks, while liberal authors and books enjoyed plenty of coverage.