Leah Barkoukis

Although no one has claimed responsibility for the “act of terrorism” at the Boston Marathon yesterday, there is a person of interest in the case, a 20-year-old Saudi national who entered the U.S. on a student visa. He is the same person of interest being guarded at a local hospital.

His apartment in a nearby Boston suburb was searched late last night:

Investigators were seen leaving the Revere house early Tuesday carrying brown paper bags, plastic trash bags and a duffel bag, according to the Associated Press.

The Pakistani Taliban, which has threatened attacks in the United States because of its support for the Pakistani government, denied any role in the marathon bombings Tuesday.

The group's spokesman, Ahsanullah Ahsan, denied involvement in a telephone call with The Associated Press. He spoke from an undisclosed location.

Federal investigators said Monday no one had claimed responsibility for the devastating attack on one of the city's most famous civic holidays, Patriots Day.

The student's name did not appear on any terror watch lists, according to Fox News’ sources, and he is just “one of multiple leads.”

Since ball bearings were used in the bombs as a way to inflict as many casualties as possible, Fox News’ Catherine Herridge says they can already be associated with the crude IEDs we see overseas. But more information will develop about a suspect(s) as evidence from the bombs is gathered from the crime scene. Authorities will be looking for what type of explosive was used, what materials were used to build it, how they detonated it and, of course, their tactics. I had the opportunity to get an in-depth look at how military Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams operate for the January issue of Townhall Magazine. More information about IEDs and how these teams analyze and defeat them is available here.

There will be a press conference this morning at 9:30 ET and a briefing will be held on Capitol Hill today by the National Counterterrorism Center. 

 

Update: Watch the FBI press conference LIVE here.

Update: The FBI press conference did not shed much new light on the marathon bombings. Law enforcement officials confirmed that only two devices were found—additional devices being reported yesterday were merely 'suspect packages that were disrupted.' Officials also said there are no known additional threats.

"This will be a worldwide investigation," Special Agent-in-Charge of the FBI's Boston Field Office Richard DesLauriers said at a Tuesday morning news conference, adding that investigators will go "wherever the leads take us."

"We will go to the ends of the Earth to identify the suspects responsible for this despicable crime," he added.

It remained unclear if the bombs were the work of a homegrown or foreign threat, but in Washington, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel called the attack "a cruel act of terror."

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis appealed to the public to come forward with any information or photographic evidence that might help authorities zero in on the killers.

"We’re looking to bring the individuals responsible for this heinous crime to justice," he said.

Update: Watch President Obama deliver a statement on the bombings LIVE here.


Leah Barkoukis

Leah Barkoukis is the Managing Editor at Townhall Magazine.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography