Young People to Obama: You're Kind of a Loser Now

Katie Pavlich

12/15/2011 12:39:00 PM - Katie Pavlich

A new poll out of Harvard, yes Harvard, shows young people believe President Obama will lose his re-election bid in 2012.

A new national poll of America's 18- to 29- year olds by Harvard's Institute of Politics (IOP), located at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, finds more Millennials predict President Barack Obama will lose his bid for re-election (36%) than win (30%).

So does this mean Republicans have locked down the youth vote? Not exactly.

The new survey also shows former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney fairing best among potential Republican challengers in a general election match-up against President Obama, trailing the president by eleven percentage points (Obama: 37%, Romney: 26%).

Considering the youth misery index has gone up significantly, as Erika wrote about last week, since Obama took office, young voters should think twice before giving Obama a second chance next year.

In 2008, near-record numbers of starry-eyed young voters turned up at the polls to usher in their supposed champion, Barack Obama.  A few years on, however, young voters are increasingly disenchanted with the President and the failure of his big-government economic policies. College grads are moving back home in droves and finding themselves increasingly frustrated in their searches for employment, reaping the benefits of hope n' change.

We've all heard of the Misery Index (which, incidentally, is this year enjoying a 20-year high), and in that vein, the Young America's Foundation has devised a Youth Misery Index as a barometer of the economic concerns that pertain especially to young people. Measuring student loan debt, youth unemployment rates, and the crippling national debt per capita we're currently destined to inherit, the situation is not pretty. (Note the moderate recent downturn in youth unemployment: in summer 2010, the Labor Department reported the lowest youth labor force participation rate in history; ergo, it would seem that many discouraged young people have simply given up.)