Heather Ginsberg
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With yesterday being the first full work day that the sequester cuts were in place, many expected to see some of the harsh realities of the budget cuts that Obama so frequently warned us about. Instead, the federal government posted 400 new jobs on Monday.

The U.S. Forest Service on Monday posted help-wanted ads for a few good men and women to work as “recreation aides” this summer, the Internal Revenue Service advertised for an office secretary in Maryland, the U.S. Mint wanted 24 people to help press coins, and the Agriculture Department said it needs three “insect production workers” to help grow bollworms in Phoenix.

Now, supposedly this is a time when all those organizations are contemplating furloughs, yet they are posting new job openings. These help-wanted ads are now raising questions about how agencies decide between saving through attrition and letting people go. But also, how about the Department of Homeland Security?

At the Homeland Security Department, which just days ago announced it was releasing some low-priority illegal immigrants from jails to await removal, the agency in charge of deportations advertised for an assistant to help with deportations.

The annual salary for the job is $60,765, enough to detain one immigrant for about 500 days.

An official at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said the agency is filling only mission-critical positions and may not end up hiring for every job it advertises.

Is it just me, or does it make more sense to use the $60,765 towards keeping the illegal immigrants in the jail? President Obama kept warning the American people about all of these potentially devastating events that could happen if the sequester cuts went into place, but obviously this is not the case.

However, there could be some really bad fallout from the cuts if those working in the federal government do not learn how to budget themselves and use their money wisely. The spending cuts are not the problem here, it’s the fact that lawmakers and those working for the government don’t know how to limit themselves.

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Heather Ginsberg

Heather Ginsberg is Townhall's web editor and community manager. Follow her on Twitter

@HeatherGinsberg

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography