Elisabeth Meinecke
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On the level of bad ideas, this one seems pretty high up there.

The Washington Post reported Wednesday that the Department of Defense may allow some Gitmo detainees to receive visits from family members.

Brilliant: let's just have a whole flood of people coming to Gitmo who are associated with radicals.  It's not like terrorists are good at coming up with ways to smuggling incendiary/harmful devices in or creative plots to cause destruction or anything. That's why I have to go through a radiation-emitting machine, an enhanced patdown, and the pain that is TSA every time I get on plane to see MY family.

And for those who think it's a case of being humane, I'd respectfully request that people do things that keep them out of Gitmo in the first place if they want that consideration.

Rep. Pete King has sent a bombshell of a letter to Secretary of Defense Robert Gates and Admiral Michael G. Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, demanding explanation. In this letter, King points out that many of the family members themselves are suspected of terrorist involvement. You know, that whole "birds of a feather" common sense concept that's so well proven it's become cliche.

And it sounds like some of the detainees really aren't too peaceable behind bars themselves.

"The remaining terrorist detainees are known to physically attack guards and interrogators, to riot, and to attempt to pass sensitive information to at-large al-Qaeda members through the mails, counsel, and chaplains," King writes.

King wants to know 1) how this potential policy would further U.S. national security interests, 2) where consideration of this plan initiated -- DOD, another cabinet, or the president, 3)what happens to family members suspected of terrorism when they get to Gitmo-- will they be denied access or detained too?, 4)Who picks up the tab for a Gitmo visit, and who flies them there (the Post story said that may happen through the International Committee of the Red Cross), 5)are you going to search the wives and family members upon their entrance/exit? 6)is there any studying of how bin Laden's death could further jeopardize U.S. personnel there, and 7)what will DOD do if the family members participate in protest, need immediate medical attention, request asylum, or break the law?

King asks for a response by May 20.

Bottom line, he says it best: "These terrorist detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not gentlemen of honor; they are cowards and murderers of women and children."


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Elisabeth Meinecke

Elisabeth Meinecke is TOWNHALL MAGAZINE Managing Editor. Follow her on Twitter @lismeinecke.