women in combat Photos on Townhall

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              FILE – in this Jan. 24, 2013, file photo Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta hands the memorandum he has just signed, ending the 1994 ban on women serving in combat, to Army Lt. Col. Tama

    FILE – in this Jan. 24, 2013, file photo Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta hands the memorandum he has just signed, ending the 1994 ban on women serving in combat, to Army Lt. Col. Tama

    Posted: 2/25/2013 3:13:34 AM EST
    FILE – in this Jan. 24, 2013, file photo Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta hands the memorandum he has just signed, ending the 1994 ban on women serving in combat, to Army Lt. Col. Tamatha Patterson of Huntingdon, Tenn., during a press briefing at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. The decision to lift the ban on women in combat has opened the door for a change in the law that currently compels only men between the ages of 18 and 25 to register for a military draft, according to legal experts and military historians. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, file)
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              In this late 2010 photo provided by Canadian Armed Forces Capt. Ashley Collette, she, center right, gives orders to soldiers about to leave on a patrol in Afghanistan. For Canadians, th

    In this late 2010 photo provided by Canadian Armed Forces Capt. Ashley Collette, she, center right, gives orders to soldiers about to leave on a patrol in Afghanistan. For Canadians, th

    Posted: 2/10/2013 12:48:59 AM EST
    In this late 2010 photo provided by Canadian Armed Forces Capt. Ashley Collette, she, center right, gives orders to soldiers about to leave on a patrol in Afghanistan. For Canadians, the presence of women in combat is old hat. Since the policy was changed by an equal-rights ruling in 1989, Canadian women have risen through the ranks and three have died fighting. Now, in the days after the U.S. decision to follow suit, some Canadians still question the wisdom of the policy, but officers and enlisted personnel interviewed by The Associated Press say they have no problem with it. (AP Photo/Capt. Ashley Collette)
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              FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012 file photo, female soldiers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division train on a firing range while testing new body armor in Fort Campbell, Ky

    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012 file photo, female soldiers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division train on a firing range while testing new body armor in Fort Campbell, Ky

    Posted: 1/25/2013 5:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012 file photo, female soldiers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division train on a firing range while testing new body armor in Fort Campbell, Ky., in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan. Women served and died on the nation’s battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. military’s official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females were doled out fitfully _ whenever commanders got in a bind and realized they needed women’s help. A look at milestones on the way to lifting the ban on women in ground combat. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
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              FILE - This March 3, 2009 file photo shows first lady Michelle Obama listening to Retired Brig. Gen. Wilma L. Vaught , president of Women in Military Service for America Memorial Center

    FILE - This March 3, 2009 file photo shows first lady Michelle Obama listening to Retired Brig. Gen. Wilma L. Vaught , president of Women in Military Service for America Memorial Center

    Posted: 1/25/2013 5:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - This March 3, 2009 file photo shows first lady Michelle Obama listening to Retired Brig. Gen. Wilma L. Vaught , president of Women in Military Service for America Memorial Center, during a tour of the center in Arlington, Va. Women served and died on the nation’s battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. military’s official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females were doled out fitfully _ whenever commanders got in a bind and realized they needed women’s help. A look at milestones on the way to lifting the ban on women in ground combat. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
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              FILE - This June 4, 1943 black-and-white file photo shows a wounded U.S. Marine is given a plasma transfusion by nurse Mae Olson aboard an aerial evacuation unit, over Guadalcanal, Solo

    FILE - This June 4, 1943 black-and-white file photo shows a wounded U.S. Marine is given a plasma transfusion by nurse Mae Olson aboard an aerial evacuation unit, over Guadalcanal, Solo

    Posted: 1/25/2013 5:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - This June 4, 1943 black-and-white file photo shows a wounded U.S. Marine is given a plasma transfusion by nurse Mae Olson aboard an aerial evacuation unit, over Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. Women served and died on the nation’s battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. military’s official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females were doled out fitfully _ whenever commanders got in a bind and realized they needed women’s help. A look at milestones on the way to lifting the ban on women in ground combat. (AP Photo, File)
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              FILE - This Sept. 22, 1942 black-and-white file photo shows Aviatrix Nancy Harkness Love, director of the Women's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron (WAFS), and Col. Robert H. Baker, commanding o

    FILE - This Sept. 22, 1942 black-and-white file photo shows Aviatrix Nancy Harkness Love, director of the Women's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron (WAFS), and Col. Robert H. Baker, commanding o

    Posted: 1/25/2013 5:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - This Sept. 22, 1942 black-and-white file photo shows Aviatrix Nancy Harkness Love, director of the Women's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron (WAFS), and Col. Robert H. Baker, commanding officer, inspect the first contingent of women pilots in the WAFS at the New Castle Army Air Base, Del. Women served and died on the nation’s battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. military’s official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females were doled out fitfully _ whenever commanders got in a bind and realized they needed women’s help. A look at milestones on the way to lifting the ban on women in ground combat. (AP Photo, File)
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              FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama gestures speaks during his final news conference of his first term in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Pre

    FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama gestures speaks during his final news conference of his first term in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Pre

    Posted: 1/25/2013 2:48:28 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama gestures speaks during his final news conference of his first term in the East Room of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama's fledgling second term agenda so far reads like a progressive wish list. In less than a week, he's vowed to tackle climate change, expand gay rights and protect government entitlements. His administration lifted a ban on women in combat and expanded opportunities for disabled students. Proposals for stricter gun laws have already been unveiled and plans for comprehensive immigration reform, including a pathway to citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants, are coming soon. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)