Wall Street Journal Photos on Townhall

  •  - Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Posted: 9/23/2011 7:13:49 PM EST
    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Chip East
  •  - Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Posted: 9/23/2011 5:09:16 PM EST
    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Chip East
  •  - Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Posted: 8/30/2011 3:24:27 PM EST
    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Chip East
  •  -
    Posted: 8/19/2011 6:10:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 13, 2010 file photo, Bank of America's headquarters are shown in Charlotte, N.C. Bank of America Corp. is cutting 3,500 employees this quarter and working on restructuring plans that will ax several thousand more jobs, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times reported citing people familiar with the situation. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 8/19/2011 3:55:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2010 file photo, a Bank of America branch is shown in Charlotte, Bank of America Corp. is cutting 3,500 employees this quarter and working on restructuring plans that will ax several thousand more jobs, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times reported Friday Aug. 19, 2011 citing people familiar with the situation. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
  •  - Bloomberg gestures as he speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Bloomberg gestures as he speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Posted: 7/21/2011 1:08:49 PM EST
    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg gestures as he speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, November 16, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  -
    Posted: 7/18/2011 4:25:53 PM EST
    People are seen reflected in a Wall Street Journal sign outside a building, Friday, July 15, 2011, in New York. Rupert Murdoch accepted the resignation of The Wall Street Journal's publisher and the chief of his British operations on Friday as the once-defiant media mogul struggled to control an escalating phone hacking scandal with apologies to the public and the family of a murdered schoolgirl. The controversy claimed its first victim in the United States as Les Hinton, chief executive of the Murdoch-owned Dow Jones & Co. and publisher of the Wall Street Journal, announced he was resigning, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/18/2011 10:36:00 AM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 13, 2007 file picture, Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corp, addresses a crowded Wall Street Journal newsroom in New York as Murdoch's $5 billion-plus bid for Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal, cleared its final hurdle; Les Hinton, left, became CEO of Dow Jones & Co., Inc., and Robert Thompson, second left, is the new publisher of Dow Jones & Co. and The Wall Street Journal. The independent committee charged with monitoring editorial integrity at The Wall Street Journal said Saturday, July 16, 2011 it is not aware of any wrongdoing at the Journal or its parent company, Dow Jones & Co. Dow Jones is owned by News Corp., which is mired in a phone-hacking scandal involving its British newspapers. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange

    Posted: 7/18/2011 8:34:21 AM EST
    Investor Carl Icahn speaks at the Wall Street Journal Deals & Deal Makers conference, held at the New York Stock Exchange, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Chip East
  •  -
    Posted: 7/17/2011 4:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Monday, April 26, 2010 file picture, Rupert Murdoch, Chairman of News Corporation, center, stands with Les Hinton, CEO of Dow Jones and Wall Street Journal publisher, left, and Robert Thomson, Wall Street Journal Managing Editor during a gala launch party in New York. The event celebrated the launch of the Journal?s New York Section, the first time The Wall Street Journal has dedicated an entire section to covering the city in which it is published. On Friday, July 15, 2011, Hinton resigned, becoming the latest News Corp. executive casualty in the phone-hacking and bribery scandal in Britain. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/16/2011 7:10:47 AM EST
    A Wall Street Journal sign is photographed outside a building, Friday, July 15, 2011, in New York. Rupert Murdoch accepted the resignation of The Wall Street Journal's publisher and the chief of his British operations as the once-defiant media mogul struggled to control an escalating phone hacking scandal with apologies to the public and the family of a murdered schoolgirl. The controversy claimed its first victim in the United States as Les Hinton, chief executive of the Murdoch-owned Dow Jones & Co. and publisher of the Wall Street Journal, announced he was resigning, effective immediately. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
  •  - To match Special Report NEWSCORP/TAINT

    To match Special Report NEWSCORP/TAINT

    Posted: 7/14/2011 2:27:05 PM EST
    A photograph of the front page of the August 1, 2007 edition of the Wall Street Journal reports that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp will purchase Dow Jones & Co for some $5 billion. Financially, owning both high and low-brow publications makes sense -- although newspapers made up only 19 percent of News Corp's revenues of $32.8 billion in 2010. In Britain, Murdoch's tabloids subsidise The Times, which has an average daily circulation of just under half a million -- about double the readership when he bought it - but is loss-making. Picture taken August 1, 2007. To match Special Report NEWSCORP/TAINT REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
  •  - The Wall Street Journal headquarters is seen in midtown Manhattan in New York

    The Wall Street Journal headquarters is seen in midtown Manhattan in New York

    Posted: 7/13/2011 11:34:12 AM EST
    The Wall Street Journal headquarters is seen in midtown Manhattan in New York, July 13, 2011. Rupert Murdoch withdrew his bid for British broadcaster BSkyB on Wednesday in the face of cross-party hostility in parliament following allegations of widespread criminality at one of his tabloid newspapers. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS MEDIA)
  •  - Goolsbee gestures as he addresses speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Goolsbee gestures as he addresses speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Posted: 7/8/2011 10:19:20 AM EST
    White House Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Austan Goolsbee gestures as he addresses the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, November 16, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - Goolsbee gestures as he addresses speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Goolsbee gestures as he addresses speaks during the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington

    Posted: 7/8/2011 10:13:55 AM EST
    White House Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Austan Goolsbee gestures as he addresses the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, November 16, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    Posted: 7/6/2011 9:30:34 PM EST
    A bank employee counts Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok in this October 12, 2010 file photo. Thailand will continue to let the baht appreciate against the dollar to limit import price inflation, the country's incoming prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, told the Wall Street Journal in an interview published on July 7, 2011. Yingluck also told the newspaper she would continue to allow the baht to float freely and had no plans to change the existing exchange-rate system. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang/Files (THAILAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    Posted: 7/6/2011 9:29:00 PM EST
    A bank employee counts Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok in this October 12, 2010 file photo. Thailand will continue to let the baht appreciate against the dollar to limit import price inflation, the country's incoming prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, told the Wall Street Journal in an interview published on July 7, 2011. Yingluck also told the newspaper she would continue to allow the baht to float freely and had no plans to change the existing exchange-rate system. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang/Files (THAILAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    File photo of a bank employee counting Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok

    Posted: 7/6/2011 9:27:20 PM EST
    A bank employee counts Thai baht notes at Kasikornbank in Bangkok in this January 21, 2010 file photo. Thailand will continue to let the baht appreciate against the dollar to limit import price inflation, the country's incoming prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, told the Wall Street Journal in an interview published on July 7, 2011. Yingluck also told the newspaper she would continue to allow the baht to float freely and had no plans to change the existing exchange-rate system. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang/Files (THAILAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - File image of Bank of America Corp, former Chief Executive Kenneth Lewis speaking during the Wall Street Journal Deals and Dealmakers conference, in New York

    File image of Bank of America Corp, former Chief Executive Kenneth Lewis speaking during the Wall Street Journal Deals and Dealmakers conference, in New York

    Posted: 7/1/2011 7:29:27 PM EST
    Bank of America Corp, former Chief Executive Kenneth Lewis speaks during the Wall Street Journal Deals and Dealmakers conference, in New York, in this file image from June 11, 2008. REUTERS/Chip East
  •  - File photo of former White House economic adviser Larry Summers in Washington

    File photo of former White House economic adviser Larry Summers in Washington

    Posted: 6/29/2011 6:51:06 PM EST
    White House economic adviser Larry Summers speaks at the 2010 meeting of the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington in this November 15, 2010 file photograph. One of Silicon Valley's most powerful venture-capital firms, Andreessen Horowitz, is adding former U.S. Treasury Secretary Larry Summers to its team. Summers, who served as Treasury Secretary in the Clinton Administration, president of Harvard and then director of the Obama White House National Economics Council until leaving at the end of last year, will join Andreessen Horowitz as a part-time special adviser, the firm said on June 29, 2011. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP