voting rights act Photos on Townhall

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              In this Wednesday, July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center, with Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., left, and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont, enter a Senate Judiciary Committ

    In this Wednesday, July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center, with Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., left, and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont, enter a Senate Judiciary Committ

    Posted: 7/18/2013 3:56:04 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center, with Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., left, and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont, enter a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing where Lewis and Sensenbrenner testified in support of the Voting Rights Act on Capitol Hill in Washington. The white Wisconsin lawyer and the black preacher from Georgia are veteran lawmakers and experts in civil rights law. When it comes to revising the Voting Rights Act of 1965, they’ve been here before. Sensenbrenner and Lewis are working together amid a Congress marked by a bitter aversion to working together. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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              In this July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., left, turns to thank Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., as he finishes his testimony in support of the Voting Rights Act on Capitol

    In this July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., left, turns to thank Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., as he finishes his testimony in support of the Voting Rights Act on Capitol

    Posted: 7/18/2013 3:56:04 AM EST
    In this July 17, 2013, photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., left, turns to thank Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., as he finishes his testimony in support of the Voting Rights Act on Capitol Hill in Washington. The white Wisconsin lawyer and the black preacher from Georgia are veteran lawmakers and experts in civil rights law. When it comes to revising the Voting Rights Act of 1965, they’ve been here before. Sensenbrenner and Lewis are working together amid a Congress marked by a bitter aversion to working together. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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              FILE - In this June 29, 2012 file photo provided by the U.S. Courts Circuit Executive's Office, Chief Justice John Roberts speaks in Farmington, Pa. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted t

    FILE - In this June 29, 2012 file photo provided by the U.S. Courts Circuit Executive's Office, Chief Justice John Roberts speaks in Farmington, Pa. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted t

    Posted: 7/4/2013 11:32:14 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 29, 2012 file photo provided by the U.S. Courts Circuit Executive's Office, Chief Justice John Roberts speaks in Farmington, Pa. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans tough questions with no easy answers over how, and where, to attract voters even GOP leaders say the party needs to stay nationally competitive. The decision caught Republicans between newfound state autonomy that conservatives covet and the law’s popularity among minority, young and poor voters who tend to align with Democrats. It’s those voters that Republicans are eyeing to expand and invigorate the GOP’s core of older, white Americans. (AP Photo/Ann Wilkins/US Courts Circuit Executive's Office, File)
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              FILE - In this May 10, 2013 file photo, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks in Manchester, N.H. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans

    FILE - In this May 10, 2013 file photo, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks in Manchester, N.H. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans

    Posted: 7/4/2013 11:32:14 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 10, 2013 file photo, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks in Manchester, N.H. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans tough questions with no easy answers over how, and where, to attract voters even GOP leaders say the party needs to stay nationally competitive. The decision caught Republicans between newfound state autonomy that conservatives covet and the law’s popularity among minority, young and poor voters who tend to align with Democrats. It’s those voters that Republicans are eyeing to expand and invigorate the GOP’s core of older, white Americans. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
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              FILE - In this June 27, 2013 file photo, Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in Grapevine, Texas. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans toug

    FILE - In this June 27, 2013 file photo, Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in Grapevine, Texas. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans toug

    Posted: 7/4/2013 11:32:14 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 27, 2013 file photo, Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in Grapevine, Texas. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans tough questions with no easy answers over how, and where, to attract voters even GOP leaders say the party needs to stay nationally competitive. The decision caught Republicans between newfound state autonomy that conservatives covet and the law’s popularity among minority, young and poor voters who tend to align with Democrats. It’s those voters that Republicans are eyeing to expand and invigorate the GOP’s core of older, white Americans. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)
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              FILE - In this May 18, 2013 file photo, Virginia Republican Gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli speaks in Richmond, Va. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted

    FILE - In this May 18, 2013 file photo, Virginia Republican Gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli speaks in Richmond, Va. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted

    Posted: 7/4/2013 11:32:14 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 18, 2013 file photo, Virginia Republican Gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli speaks in Richmond, Va. When the U.S. Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights act last week, it handed Republicans tough questions with no easy answers over how, and where, to attract voters even GOP leaders say the party needs to stay nationally competitive. The decision caught Republicans between newfound state autonomy that conservatives covet and the law’s popularity among minority, young and poor voters who tend to align with Democrats. It’s those voters that Republicans are eyeing to expand and invigorate the GOP’s core of older, white Americans. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
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              FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supr

    FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supr

    Posted: 6/29/2013 1:11:15 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supreme Court said a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and localities require close federal monitoring of elections. In one four-hour stretch in Washington this week, the nation’s political paralysis and polarization was on stark display for everyone across the country to see. First, on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, and Republicans in several southern states moved to impose voter identification laws that previously had been blocked under the law and that are blamed for helping energize growing minority communities against their party. The decision devastated Democrats. Hours later, President Barack Obama announced a series of executive actions to combat climate change. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE -In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, members of the Supreme Court gather for a group portrait at the Supreme Court in Washington. Seated from left are: Associate Justices Clarence Tho

    FILE -In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, members of the Supreme Court gather for a group portrait at the Supreme Court in Washington. Seated from left are: Associate Justices Clarence Tho

    Posted: 6/29/2013 8:23:45 AM EST
    FILE -In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, members of the Supreme Court gather for a group portrait at the Supreme Court in Washington. Seated from left are: Associate Justices Clarence Thomas, Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Standing, from left are: Associate Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer, Samuel Alito Jr., and Elena Kagan. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that marked a bitter defeat for racial minorities and a groundbreaking victory for gay rights, all in the space of a day. The justices struck down parts of two federal laws _ the Voting Rights Act and the Defense of Marriage Act _ that were passed with huge bipartisan majorities of Congress. Yet, only one justice at the center of this conservative-leaning court, Anthony Kennedy, was on the winning side both times. Kennedy joined the four more conservative justices on voting rights and he was with his liberal colleagues in the gay marriage case. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. A historic Supreme Court term ended wit

    FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. A historic Supreme Court term ended wit

    Posted: 6/29/2013 8:23:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that marked a bitter defeat for racial minorities and a groundbreaking victory for gay rights, all in the space of a day. The justices struck down parts of two federal laws _ the Voting Rights Act and the Defense of Marriage Act _ that were passed with huge bipartisan majorities of Congress. Yet, only one justice at the center of this conservative-leaning court, Anthony Kennedy, was on the winning side both times. Kennedy joined the four more conservative justices on voting rights and he was with his liberal colleagues in the gay marriage case. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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              FILE - In this March 6, 2013 file photo, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaks in Sacramento, Calif. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that mar

    FILE - In this March 6, 2013 file photo, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaks in Sacramento, Calif. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that mar

    Posted: 6/29/2013 8:23:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this March 6, 2013 file photo, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaks in Sacramento, Calif. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that marked a bitter defeat for racial minorities and a groundbreaking victory for gay rights, all in the space of a day. The justices struck down parts of two federal laws _ the Voting Rights Act and the Defense of Marriage Act _ that were passed with huge bipartisan majorities of Congress. Yet, only one justice at the center of this conservative-leaning court, Anthony Kennedy, was on the winning side both times. Kennedy joined the four more conservative justices on voting rights and he was with his liberal colleagues in the gay marriage case. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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              FILE - This June 25, 2013 file photo shows representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund standing outside the Supreme Court in Washington, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Ho

    FILE - This June 25, 2013 file photo shows representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund standing outside the Supreme Court in Washington, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Ho

    Posted: 6/29/2013 8:23:45 AM EST
    FILE - This June 25, 2013 file photo shows representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund standing outside the Supreme Court in Washington, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights case in Alabama. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that marked a bitter defeat for racial minorities and a groundbreaking victory for gay rights, all in the space of a day. The justices struck down parts of two federal laws _ the Voting Rights Act and the Defense of Marriage Act _ that were passed with huge bipartisan majorities of Congress. Yet, only one justice at the center of this conservative-leaning court, Anthony Kennedy, was on the winning side both times. Kennedy joined the four more conservative justices on voting rights and he was with his liberal colleagues in the gay marriage case. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              FILE - This June 26, 2013 file photo shows Sandy Stier, center, and her partner Kris Perry, right, plaintiffs in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the California Proposition 8 case, meeting with

    FILE - This June 26, 2013 file photo shows Sandy Stier, center, and her partner Kris Perry, right, plaintiffs in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the California Proposition 8 case, meeting with

    Posted: 6/29/2013 8:23:45 AM EST
    FILE - This June 26, 2013 file photo shows Sandy Stier, center, and her partner Kris Perry, right, plaintiffs in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the California Proposition 8 case, meeting with reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington after the court's 5-4 decision that cleared the way for the resumption of same-sex marriage in their home state of California. Gesturing at far left is fellow plaintiff Jeff Zarrillo. A historic Supreme Court term ended with a flourish of major rulings that marked a bitter defeat for racial minorities and a groundbreaking victory for gay rights, all in the space of a day. The justices struck down parts of two federal laws _ the Voting Rights Act and the Defense of Marriage Act _ that were passed with huge bipartisan majorities of Congress. Yet, only one justice at the center of this conservative-leaning court, Anthony Kennedy, was on the winning side both times. Kennedy joined the four more conservative justices on voting rights and he was with his liberal colleagues in the gay marriage case. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supr

    FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supr

    Posted: 6/29/2013 4:54:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, after the Supreme Court said a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and localities require close federal monitoring of elections. In one five-hour stretch in Washington this week, the nation’s political paralysis and polarization was on stark display for everyone across the country to see. First, on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, and Republicans in several southern states moved to impose voter identification laws that previously had been blocked under the law and that are blamed for helping energize growing minority communities against their party. The decision devastated Democrats. Hours later, President Barack Obama announced a series of executive actions to combat climate change. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              Traffic flows through downtown Calera, Ala., Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Much has changed in Shelby County since Congress passed the 1965 Voting Rights Act to protect minority rights at the

    Traffic flows through downtown Calera, Ala., Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Much has changed in Shelby County since Congress passed the 1965 Voting Rights Act to protect minority rights at the

    Posted: 6/26/2013 2:38:52 PM EST
    Traffic flows through downtown Calera, Ala., Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Much has changed in Shelby County since Congress passed the 1965 Voting Rights Act to protect minority rights at the polls, but much hasn’t. The county, which is at the center of a Supreme Court ruling that critics say all but gutted the landmark law, has grown exponentially in the nearly 50 years since the civil rights era, yet its racial balance has remained roughly constant at around 90 percent white, 10 percent black. While blacks have made electoral gains, white conservatives remain in firm control of the sprawling marble courthouse and most of the county’s towns despite a smattering of black elected officials. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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              Vice President Joe Biden gestures as he talks about the Supreme Court's ruling on the Voting Rights Act as he speaks at the 75th anniversary of the Fair Labor Standards Act, which estab

    Vice President Joe Biden gestures as he talks about the Supreme Court's ruling on the Voting Rights Act as he speaks at the 75th anniversary of the Fair Labor Standards Act, which estab

    Posted: 6/25/2013 4:05:51 PM EST
    Vice President Joe Biden gestures as he talks about the Supreme Court's ruling on the Voting Rights Act as he speaks at the 75th anniversary of the Fair Labor Standards Act, which established the minimum wage in 1938, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Biden said the Obama administration will do everything in its power to ensure fair voting in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling stopping part of the Voting Rights Act enforcement. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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              Attorney General Eric Holder expresses disappointment in the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling in the Alabama voting rights case, Shelby County v. Holder, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at the Justic

    Attorney General Eric Holder expresses disappointment in the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling in the Alabama voting rights case, Shelby County v. Holder, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at the Justic

    Posted: 6/25/2013 4:05:51 PM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder expresses disappointment in the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling in the Alabama voting rights case, Shelby County v. Holder, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at the Justice Department in Washington. The court declared unconstitutional a provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act that determines which states and localities must get Washington's approval for proposed election changes. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, about the Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights case

    Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, about the Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights case

    Posted: 6/25/2013 11:44:08 AM EST
    Ryan P. Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, talks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, about the Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights case in Alabama. Charles White, the national field director for the NAACP is second from right and Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund is at right. The Supreme Court says a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and localities require close federal monitoring of elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              Representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund stand outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights

    Representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund stand outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights

    Posted: 6/25/2013 11:44:07 AM EST
    Representatives from the NAACP Legal Defense Fund stand outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, awaiting a decision in Shelby County v. Holder, a voting rights case in Alabama. The Supreme Court says a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and localities require close federal monitoring of elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              FILE - This June 24, 2013 file photo shows people waiting outside the Supreme Court in Washington as key decisions are expected to be announced. The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a ke

    FILE - This June 24, 2013 file photo shows people waiting outside the Supreme Court in Washington as key decisions are expected to be announced. The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a ke

    Posted: 6/25/2013 10:48:29 AM EST
    FILE - This June 24, 2013 file photo shows people waiting outside the Supreme Court in Washington as key decisions are expected to be announced. The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and localities require close federal monitoring of elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE - In this March 7, 1965, file photo march leader Hosea Williams, left, leaves the scene as state troopers break up the civil rights voter registration march in Selma, Ala., and put

    FILE - In this March 7, 1965, file photo march leader Hosea Williams, left, leaves the scene as state troopers break up the civil rights voter registration march in Selma, Ala., and put

    Posted: 3/3/2013 8:03:32 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 7, 1965, file photo march leader Hosea Williams, left, leaves the scene as state troopers break up the civil rights voter registration march in Selma, Ala., and put John Lewis, center, of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee on the ground. Hundreds gathered Sunday, March 3, 2013 for a brunch with Vice President Joe Biden, and thousands were expected Sunday afternoon to march across this bridge in Selma's annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee. The event commemorates the "Bloody Sunday" beating of voting rights marchers by state troopers as they began a march to Montgomery in March 1965. The 50-mile march prompted Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act that struck down impediments to voting by African-Americans and ended all-white rule in the South. (AP Photo/File)