Vaccine Photos on Townhall

  •  - A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Posted: 10/14/2011 10:44:36 AM EST
    A Medecins Sans Frontieres worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border, August 1, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
  •  - A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Posted: 10/13/2011 12:30:51 PM EST
    A Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border August 1, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
  •  - Newly arrived Somali refugees queue to receive the measles vaccine from MSF at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Newly arrived Somali refugees queue to receive the measles vaccine from MSF at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Posted: 10/13/2011 12:08:08 PM EST
    Newly arrived Somali refugees queue to receive the measles vaccine from the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border August 1, 2011. Gunmen kidnapped two Spanish women working for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) at Kenya's Dadaab refugee camp on October 13, 2011, the third abduction of Westerners in Kenya by attackers linked to Somalia in a month. Kenyan police said they suspected Somalia's al Qaeda-linked al Shabaab insurgents were behind the kidnapping and that security forces had chased the abductors towards the border between the two countries, which has been sealed off. Picture taken August 1, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya (KENYA - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)
  •  - MSF workers direct newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    MSF workers direct newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Posted: 10/13/2011 12:06:52 PM EST
    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) workers direct newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border August 1, 2011. Gunmen kidnapped two Spanish women working for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) at Kenya's Dadaab refugee camp on October 13, 2011, the third abduction of Westerners in Kenya by attackers linked to Somalia in a month. Kenyan police said they suspected Somalia's al Qaeda-linked al Shabaab insurgents were behind the kidnapping and that security forces had chased the abductors towards the border between the two countries, which has been sealed off. Picture taken August 1, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya (KENYA - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)
  •  - A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    A MSF worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab

    Posted: 10/13/2011 12:05:10 PM EST
    A Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) worker ushers newly arrived Somali refugees before they are administered polio vaccine at the Ifo extension refugee camp in Dadaab, near the Kenya-Somalia border August 1, 2011. Gunmen kidnapped two Spanish women working for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) at Kenya's Dadaab refugee camp on October 13, 2011, the third abduction of Westerners in Kenya by attackers linked to Somalia in a month. Kenyan police said they suspected Somalia's al Qaeda-linked al Shabaab insurgents were behind the kidnapping and that security forces had chased the abductors towards the border between the two countries, which has been sealed off. Picture taken August 1, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya (KENYA - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)
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    Posted: 10/3/2011 4:20:59 PM EST
    In this Sept. 29, 2011 photo, Kandace O'Neill poses with her 7-month-old daughter, in Lakeville, Minn. O'Neill's views on child vaccinations are shared by many parents who don't follow federal vaccine advice. Her 5-year-old son has had no vaccinations since he turned 1 and the baby girl has received none of the recommended shots. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
  •  - A health worker prepares a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City

    A health worker prepares a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City

    Posted: 10/3/2011 2:18:49 AM EST
    A health worker prepares a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City July 22, 2011. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya
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    Posted: 9/20/2011 3:05:49 AM EST
    An empty bottle of Tetanus, Diphthera and Pertussis, (whooping cough) vaccine sits on display at Inderkum High School, Monday, Sept. 19, 2011, in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years _ a lot faster than doctors believed _ and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 9/20/2011 3:05:49 AM EST
    Nurse Susan Peel draws whooping cough vaccination before giving an injection to a student at Inderkum High School, Monday, Sept. 19, 2011, in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years _ a lot faster than doctors believed _ and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  -
    Posted: 9/20/2011 3:05:49 AM EST
    Nurse Susan Peel gives a whooping cough vaccination to a student at Inderkum High School, Monday, Sept. 19, 2011, in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years _ a lot faster than doctors believed _ and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 9/19/2011 5:05:47 PM EST
    An empty bottle of Tetanus, Diphthera and Pertussis, (whooping cough) vaccine is seen at Inderkum High School in Sacramento. Calif. A law passed last year by the state Legislature requires all middle and high school students to receive the vaccination by the start of the 2011- 2012 school year. A 30-day extension had been granted, but many school districts began hitting that deadline last week. A free clinic was set up at Inderkum High for students to get the shot. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  - A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Posted: 9/7/2011 7:40:49 AM EST
    A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi September 7, 2011. Virologists warned on Tuesday that there was no vaccine against a mutant strain of H5N1 bird flu now spreading in China and Vietnam and called for closer monitoring of the disease in poultry and wild birds to stop it spreading to people. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS)
  •  - Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Posted: 9/7/2011 7:39:52 AM EST
    Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi September 7, 2011. Virologists warned on Tuesday that there was no vaccine against a mutant strain of H5N1 bird flu now spreading in China and Vietnam and called for closer monitoring of the disease in poultry and wild birds to stop it spreading to people. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS)
  •  - Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Posted: 9/7/2011 7:38:59 AM EST
    Ducklings are pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi September 7, 2011. Virologists warned on Tuesday that there was no vaccine against a mutant strain of H5N1 bird flu now spreading in China and Vietnam and called for closer monitoring of the disease in poultry and wild birds to stop it spreading to people. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS)
  •  - A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi

    Posted: 9/7/2011 7:37:12 AM EST
    A duckling is pictured at an incubating farm outside Hanoi September 7, 2011. Virologists warned on Tuesday that there was no vaccine against a mutant strain of H5N1 bird flu now spreading in China and Vietnam and called for closer monitoring of the disease in poultry and wild birds to stop it spreading to people. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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    Posted: 9/6/2011 6:15:46 AM EST
    Flu shots have long been injected deep into muscle, requiring a needle an inch long or longer, such as the needle seen at left. However, a new version named: Sanofi Pasteur's Fluzone Intradermal, hitting the market this fall, at right, is less than a tenth of an inch long, the first flu vaccine that works by injecting just into the skin. The new needle is about as long as a single drop of fluid, as demonstrated in Washington, on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  -
    Posted: 9/6/2011 6:15:46 AM EST
    Flu shots have long been injected deep into muscle, requiring a needle an inch long or longer, such as the needle seen at left. However, a new version named: Sanofi Pasteur's Fluzone Intradermal, hitting the market this fall, at right, is less than a tenth of an inch long, the first flu vaccine that works by injecting just into the skin, as compared in Washington, on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  - Nasal sprayers with the H1N1 swine flu vaccine are seen at Dodge Park Elementary School in Landover

    Nasal sprayers with the H1N1 swine flu vaccine are seen at Dodge Park Elementary School in Landover

    Posted: 9/5/2011 4:23:49 PM EST
    Nasal sprayers with the H1N1 swine flu vaccine are seen at Dodge Park Elementary School in Landover, Maryland, October 9, 2009. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 12:40:48 PM EST
    In this Sept. 2, 2011 photo, a box of frozen vaccine is seen at the Bedford Pharmacy in Bedford, N.H. New Hampshire pharmacists now can give vaccinations for shingles and pneumonia without a prescription, but the medical community isn't happy about it. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  •  - Health workers wait for passengers and airline employees to apply a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City

    Health workers wait for passengers and airline employees to apply a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City

    Posted: 7/22/2011 5:32:38 PM EST
    Health workers wait for passengers and airline employees to apply a vaccine against measles at the Benito Juarez international airport in Mexico City July 22, 2011. Health officials started a vaccination campaign against measles after detecting the first case of the disease in four years, local media reported. An 18-months-old baby, who arrived on July 10 from France, showed symptoms of the disease and the neighbourhood where she lives in is under watch. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)