Vaccine Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 11/29/2011 2:35:49 PM EST
    CORRECTS TYPE OF VACCINE TO H5N1 INSTEAD OF H1N1 - In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, workers prepare to wrap the packages containing vials of H5N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 2:35:49 PM EST
    CORRECTS TYPE OF VACCINE TO H5N1 INSTEAD OF H1N1 - In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, workers inspect labels on vials containing H5N1 flu vaccine during production at the Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 2:35:49 PM EST
    CORRECTS TYPE OF VACCINE TO H5N1 INSTEAD OF H1N1 - In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, a worker inspects vials containing H5N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 2:35:49 PM EST
    CORRECTS TYPE OF VACCINE TO H5N1 INSTEAD OF H1N1 - In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, a worker inspects the label on vials containing H5N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 8:05:46 AM EST
    CORRECTS TYPE OF VACCINE TO H5N1 INSTEAD OF H1N1 - In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, vials of H5N1 flu vaccine by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. are seen during production at Sinovac facilities in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, a worker inspects labels on vials containing H1N1 flu vaccine during production at the Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, workers prepare to wrap the packages containing vials of H1N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, vials of H1N1 flu vaccine by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. are seen during production at Sinovac facilities in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, workers inspect labels on vials containing H1N1 flu vaccine during production at the Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, a worker inspects vials containing H1N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/29/2011 4:25:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011, a worker inspects the label on vials containing H1N1 flu vaccine produced by Beijing-based drug maker Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in Beijing. The world should get ready for a new Made in China product, vaccines. After years of supplying its own market, China's vaccine makers are gearing up to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world's poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:47 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, sitting in her home in Ashland, Ore., Jennifer Margulis shows off empty vials of vaccine that she saves in case one of her children has a bad reaction. An author of books on parenting who has written about childhood vaccines, Margulis is one of a growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 5:05:48 PM EST
    In this undated image released by Shantha, an Indian company that's part of the French pharmaceutical company Sanofi Pasteur, is pictured a sample of the vaccine against cholera, Shanchol. The World Health Organization in September approved the use of Shanchol., which then allowed U.N. agencies like Unicef to procure the vaccine. Haiti's two most prominent health care organizations are now preparing a new assault on the country's deadly cholera epidemic: the dispatch of hundreds of workers in January to administer the Shanchol vaccine against the disease. (AP Photo/Shantha)
  •  - A girl reacts as she receives a flu vaccine shot during a medical mission in Tondo, Manila

    A girl reacts as she receives a flu vaccine shot during a medical mission in Tondo, Manila

    Posted: 10/29/2011 2:16:46 AM EST
    A girl reacts as she receives a flu vaccine shot during a medical mission conducted by a civic group as part of the U.N.'s countdown to the seven billion global population, in Tondo, Manila October 29, 2011. The world's population will reach seven billion on October 31, 2011, according to projections by the United Nations, which says this global milestone presents both an opportunity and a challenge for the planet. While more people are living longer and healthier lives, says the U.N., gaps between rich and poor are widening and more people than ever are vulnerable to food insecurity and water shortages. REUTERS/Erik De Castro (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY HEALTH)
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    Posted: 10/26/2011 2:20:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 28, 2006 file photo, a doctor holds the human papillomavirus vaccine Gardiasil in his hand at his Chicago office. The controversial HPV shot given to girls should also be given to boys, in part to help prevent the spread of the virus through sex, a government medical panel said Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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    Posted: 10/24/2011 7:25:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2011 file photo, an Indian child is administered polio vaccine during a polio eradication campaign in Bangalore, India. Health officials said Monday, Oct. 24, 2011 there has not been a case of polio in India for nine months, the longest the country has ever been polio free. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)
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    Posted: 10/24/2011 7:25:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2011 file photo, a heath worker puts a mark on the child's finger after administering him polio vaccine during a polio eradication campaign in Bangalore, India. Health officials said Monday, Oct. 24, 2011 there has not been a case of polio in India for nine months, the longest the country has ever been polio free. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)
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    Posted: 10/18/2011 4:45:51 PM EST
    In this 2005 photo made available by the University of Notre Dame via the CDC, an Anopheles funestus mosquito takes a blood meal from a human host. The quest for the world's first malaria vaccine appears to have taken a big step. The first results from a late-stage test in seven African countries were released Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011. They show the experimental shots cut the number of cases of malaria in half in young children. In Africa, the major vectors for malaria are the Anopheles funestus and Anopheles gambiae. (AP Photo/CDC, University of Notre Dame, James Gathany)
  •  - To match Special Report MALARIA/COST

    To match Special Report MALARIA/COST

    Posted: 10/18/2011 1:49:58 PM EST
    Scientist Joe Cohen, who has been working on a malaria vaccine since 1987, poses for a photograph at GlaxoSmithKline biologicals (GSK) research site in Rixensart December 8, 2010. REUTERS/Thierry Roge
  •  - File photograph shows scientist Joe Cohen posing for a photograph at GlaxoSmithKline biologicals research site in Rixensart, Belgium

    File photograph shows scientist Joe Cohen posing for a photograph at GlaxoSmithKline biologicals research site in Rixensart, Belgium

    Posted: 10/18/2011 1:26:02 PM EST
    Scientist Joe Cohen is seen posing for a photograph at GlaxoSmithKline biologicals (GSK) research site in Rixensart, Belgium in this December 8, 2010 file photograph. For Joe Cohen, a GlaxoSmithKline research scientist who has spent 24 years trying to create the world's first malaria vaccine, Tuesday, October 18, 2011 goes down as a fabulous day. Data showing the success of his RTS,S vaccine were unveiled at an international conference on malaria. REUTERS/Thierry Roge/Files (BELGIUM - Tags: BUSINESS HEADSHOT HEALTH)


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