Vaccine Photos on Townhall

  •  - Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Posted: 5/17/2011 7:13:31 AM EST
    Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva May 17, 2011. The World Health Assembly is the annual meeting of the World Health Organization's (WHO) 193 Member States and it is the supreme decision-making body of WHO which sets the policy for the Organization and approves the budget. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Posted: 5/17/2011 7:12:58 AM EST
    Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva May 17, 2011. The World Health Assembly is the annual meeting of the World Health Organization's (WHO) 193 Member States and it is the supreme decision-making body of WHO which sets the policy for the Organization and approves the budget. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Gates co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly in Geneva

    Posted: 5/17/2011 7:12:58 AM EST
    Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds vaccine during a news conference after his address to the 64th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva May 17, 2011. The World Health Assembly is the annual meeting of the World Health Organization's (WHO) 193 Member States and it is the supreme decision-making body of WHO which sets the policy for the Organization and approves the budget. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    Posted: 5/6/2011 3:17:42 AM EST
    A nurse prepares a H1N1 flu vaccine at a hospital in Budapest in this November 20, 2009 file photo. The clinical trials business has gone global as drugmakers seek cheaper venues for studies and cast their net further afield for big pools of "treatment-naive" patients who are not already taking other drugs that could make them unsuitable subjects for testing new ones. And it is not only the practicalities of running big clinical trials as efficiently and cheaply as possible that is driving the change. The drug industry is also paying a lot more attention these days to the promise of emerging markets, whose healthcare authorities, just like those in the United States and Western Europe, are keen to see cutting-edge science conducted in their backyards. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS REUTERS/Karoly Arvai/Files (HUNGARY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    Posted: 5/6/2011 3:17:42 AM EST
    A nurse prepares a H1N1 flu vaccine at a hospital in Budapest in this November 20, 2009 file photo. The clinical trials business has gone global as drugmakers seek cheaper venues for studies and cast their net further afield for big pools of "treatment-naive" patients who are not already taking other drugs that could make them unsuitable subjects for testing new ones. And it is not only the practicalities of running big clinical trials as efficiently and cheaply as possible that is driving the change. The drug industry is also paying a lot more attention these days to the promise of emerging markets, whose healthcare authorities, just like those in the United States and Western Europe, are keen to see cutting-edge science conducted in their backyards. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS REUTERS/Karoly Arvai/Files (HUNGARY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    Posted: 5/6/2011 3:17:42 AM EST
    A nurse prepares a H1N1 flu vaccine at a hospital in Budapest in this November 20, 2009 file photo. The clinical trials business has gone global as drugmakers seek cheaper venues for studies and cast their net further afield for big pools of "treatment-naive" patients who are not already taking other drugs that could make them unsuitable subjects for testing new ones. And it is not only the practicalities of running big clinical trials as efficiently and cheaply as possible that is driving the change. The drug industry is also paying a lot more attention these days to the promise of emerging markets, whose healthcare authorities, just like those in the United States and Western Europe, are keen to see cutting-edge science conducted in their backyards. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS REUTERS/Karoly Arvai/Files (HUNGARY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    Posted: 5/6/2011 3:17:42 AM EST
    A nurse prepares a H1N1 flu vaccine at a hospital in Budapest in this November 20, 2009 file photo. The clinical trials business has gone global as drugmakers seek cheaper venues for studies and cast their net further afield for big pools of "treatment-naive" patients who are not already taking other drugs that could make them unsuitable subjects for testing new ones. And it is not only the practicalities of running big clinical trials as efficiently and cheaply as possible that is driving the change. The drug industry is also paying a lot more attention these days to the promise of emerging markets, whose healthcare authorities, just like those in the United States and Western Europe, are keen to see cutting-edge science conducted in their backyards. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS REUTERS/Karoly Arvai/Files (HUNGARY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS

    Posted: 5/6/2011 3:17:42 AM EST
    A nurse prepares a H1N1 flu vaccine at a hospital in Budapest in this November 20, 2009 file photo. The clinical trials business has gone global as drugmakers seek cheaper venues for studies and cast their net further afield for big pools of "treatment-naive" patients who are not already taking other drugs that could make them unsuitable subjects for testing new ones. And it is not only the practicalities of running big clinical trials as efficiently and cheaply as possible that is driving the change. The drug industry is also paying a lot more attention these days to the promise of emerging markets, whose healthcare authorities, just like those in the United States and Western Europe, are keen to see cutting-edge science conducted in their backyards. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/TRIALS REUTERS/Karoly Arvai/Files (HUNGARY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - A veterinarian prepares an vaccine injection for a pig being held by workers at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    A veterinarian prepares an vaccine injection for a pig being held by workers at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    Posted: 4/23/2011 10:58:50 PM EST
    A veterinarian prepares an vaccine injection a pig being held by workers at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana April 23, 2011. The vaccine will protect the pig from parasites. Across Cuba, new farmers are tilling fertile fields abandoned for decades and city streets are abuzz with market stalls as private businesses sow the seeds of what many hope will be an economic revival. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - Workers hold a pig as a vet prepares a vaccine injection to protect the animal from parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    Workers hold a pig as a vet prepares a vaccine injection to protect the animal from parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    Posted: 4/23/2011 10:56:42 PM EST
    Workers hold a pig as a vet prepares a vaccine injection to protect the animal from parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana April 23, 2011. Across Cuba, new farmers are tilling fertile fields abandoned for decades and city streets are abuzz with market stalls as private businesses sow the seeds of what many hope will be an economic revival. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - A vet injects a pig with a vaccine against parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    A vet injects a pig with a vaccine against parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana

    Posted: 4/23/2011 10:54:49 PM EST
    A vet injects a pig with a vaccine against parasites at a private farm on the outskirts of Havana April 23, 2011. Across Cuba, new farmers are tilling fertile fields abandoned for decades and city streets are abuzz with market stalls as private businesses sow the seeds of what many hope will be an economic revival. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
  •  - Argentine President Fernandez receives a dose of flu vaccine as part of a national campaign in Buenos Aires

    Argentine President Fernandez receives a dose of flu vaccine as part of a national campaign in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 3/31/2011 4:23:50 PM EST
    Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner receives a dose of flu vaccine as part of a national campaign at the Casa Rosada goverment palace in Buenos Aires March 31, 2011. REUTERS/Handout-Presidency (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - A man receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in a jail in Ciudad Juarez

    A man receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in a jail in Ciudad Juarez

    Posted: 3/30/2011 2:20:39 AM EST
    A man receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in a jail in Ciudad Juarez March 29, 2011. Local health authorities have reported the reappearance of the influenza A (H1N1) virus, or swine flu, in the state of Chihuahua. So far, three people have died and another three have been reported to be infected with the virus. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH CRIME LAW)
  •  - A child visiting a relative at a jail receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in Ciudad Juarez

    A child visiting a relative at a jail receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in Ciudad Juarez

    Posted: 3/30/2011 1:58:48 AM EST
    A child visiting a relative at a jail receives a dose of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in Ciudad Juarez March 29, 2011. Local health authorities have reported the reappearance of the influenza A (H1N1) virus, or swine flu, in the state of Chihuahua. So far, three people have died and another three have been reported to be infected with the virus. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH)
  •  - A nurse prepares a vaccine against the influenza A (H1N1) virus, or swine flu, in Caracas

    A nurse prepares a vaccine against the influenza A (H1N1) virus, or swine flu, in Caracas

    Posted: 3/29/2011 3:26:54 PM EST
    A nurse prepares a vaccine against the influenza A (H1N1) virus, or swine flu, in Caracas March 29, 2011. There are 415 reported cases of swine flu in people across the country, Venezuela's Health Minister Eugenia Sader said on Monday. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH)
  •  - An H1N1 flu vaccine inoculation is given at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania

    An H1N1 flu vaccine inoculation is given at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania

    Posted: 3/29/2010 5:59:23 PM EST
    An H1N1 flu vaccine inoculation is given at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania October 28, 2009. REUTERS/Brad Bower
  •  - Boonya, who is 8 months pregnant, receives H1N1 influenza vaccine shot from medical staff at hospital in Nonthaburi province

    Boonya, who is 8 months pregnant, receives H1N1 influenza vaccine shot from medical staff at hospital in Nonthaburi province

    Posted: 1/11/2010 12:35:19 AM EST
    Boonya Klaer-orm, 25, who is 8 months pregnant, receives a H1N1 influenza vaccine shot from a medical staff at a hospital in Nonthaburi province, on the outskirts of Bangkok January 11, 2010. Thailand started the H1N1 vaccination programme on Monday to combat the deadly virus which killed 192 people in the country. Some two million doses of the vaccine were imported from France to be handed out to high-risk groups during the programme, health officials said. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom (THAILAND - Tags: HEALTH)
  •  - To match special report USA-HEALTHCARE/GEISINGER

    To match special report USA-HEALTHCARE/GEISINGER

    Posted: 12/8/2009 1:33:11 AM EST
    A nurse holds up a vial of H1N1 flu vaccine prior to an inoculation at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania October 28, 2009. Based in central Pennsylvania, a rural region once dominated by coal mining, the Geisinger system has recently earned a reputation for high-quality care at a lower-than-average cost. The White House refers to it as an "island of excellence" in the nation's murky healthcare waters. Picture taken October 28, 2009. To match special report USA-HEALTHCARE/GEISINGER REUTERS/Brad Bower (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - Secretary of Health and Human Services Sebelius and Novartis CEO and Chairman Vasella tour new Novartis vaccine facility in Holly Springs

    Secretary of Health and Human Services Sebelius and Novartis CEO and Chairman Vasella tour new Novartis vaccine facility in Holly Springs

    Posted: 11/24/2009 3:15:04 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius (C) and Novartis CEO and Chairman Dr. Daniel Vasella (R) tour the new Novartis vaccine facility with other officials in Holly Springs, North Carolina, November 24, 2009. The facility, which officially opened Tuesday, is the first large scale flu cell culture and adjuvant manufacturing facility in the United States. It will have the capability to produce seasonal flu cell culture vaccine, pre-pandemic vaccine and 150 million doses of pandemic vaccine within six months of an influenza pandemic declaration. REUTERS/Jason Arthurs (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SOCIETY HEALTH POLITICS)
  •  - Novartis employee works in area where MF-59, an immune response booster, is added to vaccines at Novartis flu vaccine facility in Holly Springs

    Novartis employee works in area where MF-59, an immune response booster, is added to vaccines at Novartis flu vaccine facility in Holly Springs

    Posted: 11/24/2009 2:50:57 PM EST
    A Novartis employee works in the area where MF-59, a distinguishing immune response booster used by Novartis in Europe, is added to vaccines at the Novartis flu vaccine facility in Holly Springs, North Carolina, November 24, 2009. The facility, which officially opened Tuesday, is the first large scale flu cell culture and adjuvant manufacturing facility in the United States. It will have the capability to produce seasonal flu cell culture vaccine, pre-pandemic vaccine and 150 million doses of pandemic vaccine within six months of an influenza pandemic declaration. REUTERS/Jason Arthurs (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SOCIETY HEALTH)