Vaccinations Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given a flu vaccine shot by registered nurse Rosemary Jones, also with the h

    FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given a flu vaccine shot by registered nurse Rosemary Jones, also with the h

    Posted: 1/12/2013 3:08:28 PM EST
    FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given a flu vaccine shot by registered nurse Rosemary Jones, also with the health department, in Jackson, Miss. A survey by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers found that in 2011, more than 400 U.S. hospitals required flu vaccinations for their employees and 29 hospitals fired employees that were not vaccinated against the virus. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
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              FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given an intradermal shot of flu vaccine by registered nurse Rosemary Jones,

    FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given an intradermal shot of flu vaccine by registered nurse Rosemary Jones,

    Posted: 1/12/2013 1:58:37 PM EST
    FILE - In this file photo taken Oct. 17, 2012, Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given an intradermal shot of flu vaccine by registered nurse Rosemary Jones, also with the health department, in Jackson, Miss. A survey by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers found that in 2011, more than 400 U.S. hospitals required flu vaccinations for their employees and 29 hospitals fired employees that were not vaccinated against the virus. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
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              In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht stands by the entrance to the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are consider

    In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht stands by the entrance to the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are consider

    Posted: 9/9/2012 2:23:42 PM EST
    In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht stands by the entrance to the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are considering a first-in-the-nation bill that would require parents to discuss vaccinations with pediatricians or nurse practitioners before they would be allowed to exempt their children, a move that has angered parents at private schools with high opt-out rates. 80 percent of the students at the school have filed personal belief exemptions to get out of vaccinating their children. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
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              In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht poses in a classroom at the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are considerin

    In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht poses in a classroom at the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are considerin

    Posted: 9/9/2012 2:23:42 PM EST
    In this photo taken Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 school director Debra Lambrecht poses in a classroom at the private Greenwood School in Mill Valley, Calif. California lawmakers are considering a first-in-the-nation bill that would require parents to discuss vaccinations with pediatricians or nurse practitioners before they would be allowed to exempt their children, a move that has angered parents at private schools with high opt-out rates. 80 percent of the students at the school have filed personal belief exemptions to get out of vaccinating their children. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
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    Posted: 6/18/2012 2:10:46 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, May 30, 2012 photo, a boy and his mother peek through a window decorated with a banner urging people to take polio vaccinations outside a children's hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. In February 2012, the world was cheered to learn that India had gone a full year with no new cases of polio - a landmark that left only Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria on the World Health Organization's list of countries where the disease is endemic. But the battle is far from over, judging by the WHO's latest expressions of alarm. It says that in both Nigeria and Afghanistan the number is creeping up, while budget shortfalls are jeopardizing the effort to hold polio at bay in 24 other high-risk countries. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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    Posted: 4/23/2012 4:05:46 PM EST
    In this April 20, 2012, photo, Holly Ann Haley, 4, gets vaccinations at the doctor's office in Berlin, Vt. Vermont continues to be embroiled in a debate over ending the philosophical exemption that allows parents to have their kids skip the immunizations required for most children to attend school. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  •  - A vaccination point against measles and rubella is seen in a health point in El Alto in the outskirts of La Paz

    A vaccination point against measles and rubella is seen in a health point in El Alto in the outskirts of La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:50:06 PM EST
    A vaccination point against measles and rubella is seen in a health point in El Alto in the outskirts of La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200, 000 children in the country, local media reported. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - A vial of vaccine against measles and rubella is seen at a health point in El Alto, in the outskirts of La Paz,

    A vial of vaccine against measles and rubella is seen at a health point in El Alto, in the outskirts of La Paz,

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:47:12 PM EST
    A vial of vaccine against measles and rubella is seen at a health point in El Alto, in the outskirts of La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200, 000 children in the country, local media reported. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:43:27 PM EST
    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200, 000 children in the country, local media reported. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA)
  •  - A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:41:07 PM EST
    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200, 000 children in the country, local media reported. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA)
  •  - Children prepares before their vaccination against measles and rubella in El Alto outskirts of La Paz

    Children prepares before their vaccination against measles and rubella in El Alto outskirts of La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:38:45 PM EST
    Children prepares before their vaccination against measles and rubella in El Alto outskirts of La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200, 000 children in the country, local media reported. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:36:31 PM EST
    A child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200,000 of the children in the country, reported local media. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
  •  - A Bolivian child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    A Bolivian child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz

    Posted: 4/15/2012 2:35:56 PM EST
    A Bolivian child reacts while receiving a vaccination against measles and rubella in La Paz, April 15, 2012. Bolivian health officials will offer vaccinations to some 200,000 of the children in the country, reported local media. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:47 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, Michele Pereira poses at a park in Ashland, Ore., holding her daughter Genevieve, 2, as her daughter Evangeline, 6, plays in the background. A registered nurse, Pereira is among the growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:47 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, Michele Pereira poses with her daughters, Evangeline, 6, right, and Genevieve, 2, at a park in Ashland, Ore. A registered nurse, Pereira is among the growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:47 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, sitting in her home in Ashland, Ore., Jennifer Margulis shows off empty vials of vaccine that she saves in case one of her children has a bad reaction. An author of books on parenting who has written about childhood vaccines, Margulis is one of a growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:47 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, Jennifer Margulis, center, poses outside her home in Ashland, Ore., with two of her children, Hesperus, left, and Leona. An author of books on parenting who has written about childhood vaccines, Margulis is one of a growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 5:55:46 PM EST
    In this Nov. 14, 2011 photo, Michele Pereira sits with her daughters, Evangeline, 6, right, and Genevieve, 2, at a park in Ashland, Ore. A registered nurse, Pereira is among the growing number of parents questioning the government's schedule of mandatory vaccinations for children. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 5:05:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2010 file photo, a woman crosses a street covered with dirty water in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In January 2012, health workers will fan out in the Central Plateau and the capital, urging people to seek vaccinations and then documenting those who do. The program will inoculate only 1 percent of the population and deplete the world's stock of available cholera vaccine. Cholera, spread by water and contact with other people who have the disease, has sickened nearly 500,000 and killed more than 6,500, according Haiti's Health Ministry. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 5:05:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2011 file photo, a girl receives treatment for cholera symptoms at a Doctors Without Borders, MSF, cholera clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In January 2012, health workers will fan out in the Central Plateau and the capital, urging people to seek vaccinations and then documenting those who do. The program will inoculate only 1 percent of the population and deplete the world's stock of available cholera vaccine. Cholera, spread by water and contact with other people who have the disease, has sickened nearly 500,000 and killed more than 6,500, according Haiti's Health Ministry. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)