USDA Photos on Townhall

  •  - US Forest Service handout photo of the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview

    US Forest Service handout photo of the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview

    Posted: 8/15/2012 7:03:55 PM EST
    A helicopter drops Thermo-Gel on the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview, Oregon, in this USDA Forest Service handout photo dated August 14, 2012. REUTERS/Lucinda Nolan/Fremont-Winema National Forest/Handout
  •  - US Forest Service handout photo of the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview

    US Forest Service handout photo of the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview

    Posted: 8/15/2012 7:03:55 PM EST
    A helicopter drops Thermo-Gel on the Barry Point wildfire near Lakeview, Oregon, in this USDA Forest Service handout photo dated August 14, 2012. REUTERS/Lucinda Nolan/Fremont-Winema National Forest/Handout
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 3:15:48 AM EST
    Noah Thomases prepares cabbage for Good Eats CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) on Monday, May 7, 2012 in Craftsbury, Vt. Local food is big in Vermont, which ranks as the top state in a new Locavore Index, based on the number of farmers? markets and community supported agriculture farms where customers pay ahead for produce and other foods throughout the season. Vermont had 99 farmers? markets, 164 CSAs, based on USDA data, and a population of 621,760, according to 2010 census. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 3:15:48 AM EST
    This Monday, May 7, 2012 photo shows fields and greenhouses at Good Eats CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) in Craftsbury, Vt. Local food is big in Vermont, which ranks as the top state in a new Locavore Index, based on the number of farmers? markets and community supported agriculture farms where customers pay ahead for produce and other foods throughout the season. Vermont had 99 farmers? markets, 164 CSAs, based on USDA data, and a population of 621,760, according to 2010 census. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 3:15:48 AM EST
    A worker weeds a field for Good Eats CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) on Monday, May 7, 2012 in Craftsbury, Vt. Local food is big in Vermont, which ranks as the top state in a new Locavore Index, based on the number of farmers? markets and community supported agriculture farms where customers pay ahead for produce and other foods throughout the season. Vermont had 99 farmers? markets, 164 CSAs, based on USDA data, and a population of 621,760, according to 2010 census. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 3:15:48 AM EST
    Annie Myers harvests fresh greens for Good Eats CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) on Monday, May 7, 2012 in Craftsbury, Vt. Local food is big in Vermont, which ranks as the top state in a new Locavore Index, based on the number of farmers? markets and community supported agriculture farms where customers pay ahead for produce and other foods throughout the season. Vermont had 99 farmers? markets, 164 CSAs, based on USDA data, and a population of 621,760, according to 2010 census. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 4/28/2012 4:05:47 AM EST
    Tagged cattle are gathered at Larson Farms/Midwest Feeders, one of the largest ranches in Illinois, Wednesday, April 25, 2012, in Maple Park, Ill. Owner Mike Martz, who raises 6,000 cattle a year, says the USDA system is working and that the discovery of mad cow disease in a lone cow in California is a prime example. (AP Photo/Charles Osgood)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:49 PM EST
    A cow stands behind a fence in DeWitt, Neb., Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The beef industry responded swiftly after the first new case of mad cow disease was found in the U.S. since 2006. With billions of dollars at risk, the USDA and other government officials quickly explained that consumers were never at risk because none of the animal?s meat was bound for the food supply. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:49 PM EST
    Cows graze in a field in DeWitt, Neb., Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The beef industry responded swiftly after the first new case of mad cow disease was found in the U.S. since 2006. With billions of dollars at risk, the USDA and other government officials quickly explained that consumers were never at risk because none of the animal?s meat was bound for the food supply. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:49 PM EST
    This Wednesday, April 25, 2012 photo shows a herd of cows in DeWitt, Neb. The beef industry responded swiftly after the first new case of mad cow disease was found in the U.S. since 2006. With billions of dollars at risk, the USDA and other government officials quickly explained that consumers were never at risk because none of the animal?s meat was bound for the food supply. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:49 PM EST
    Tagged cattle are gathered at Larson Farms/Midwest Feeders, one of the largest ranches in Illinois, Wednesday, April 25, 2012, in Maple Park, Ill. Owner Mike Martz, who raises 6,000 cattle a year, says the USDA system is working and that the discovery of mad cow disease in a lone cow in California is a prime example. (AP Photo/Charles Osgood)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:48 PM EST
    Dave Diehl vaccinates incoming cattle at Larson Farms/Midwest Feeders, one of the largest ranches in Illinois, Wednesday, April 25, 2012, in Maple Park, Ill. Owner Mike Martz, who raises 6,000 cattle a year, says the USDA system is working and that the discovery of mad cow disease in a lone cow in California is a prime example. (AP Photo/Charles Osgood)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 1:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2011, file photo Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., looks at hanging beef carcasses at Amend Packing Co. in Des Moines, Iowa. Before the announcement Tuesday, April 24, 2012, of the discovery of mad cow disease in a dead dairy cow in California, the USDA was forecasting overall U.S. beef exports would be 2.7 billion pounds this year, a slight decline from 2011 because supplies are expected to be tighter this year.(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 1:35:48 PM EST
    A cow stands with others in DeWitt, Neb., Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The beef industry responded swiftly after the first new case of mad cow disease was found in the U.S. since 2006. With billions of dollars at risk, the USDA and other government officials quickly explained that consumers were never at risk because none of the animal?s meat was bound for the food supply. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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    Posted: 4/25/2012 9:00:47 PM EST
    Cattle are fed at Larson Farms/Midwest Feeders, one of the largest ranches in Illinois, Wednesday, April 25, 2012, in Maple Park, Ill. Owner Mike Martz, who raises 6,000 cattle a year, says the USDA system is working and that the discovery of mad cow disease in a lone cow in California is a prime example. (AP Photo/Charles Osgood)
  •  - USDA handout photo of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    USDA handout photo of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Posted: 4/25/2012 1:45:24 PM EST
    Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad-cow disease, is seen in this undated handout photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. U.S. authorities reported the country's first case of mad cow disease in six years, swiftly assuring consumers and global importers there was no danger of meat from the California dairy cow entering the food chain. REUTERS/USDA/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS POLITICS FOOD HEALTH) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
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    Posted: 4/4/2012 3:00:48 PM EST
    This photo provided by USDA shows Agriculture Deputy Secretary Dr. Kathleen Merrigan addresses a forum entitled "Shaping the Farm Bill for a Sustainable Future," at the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, George Washington University in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, March 1, 2012, in this handout photo provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (AP Photo/ USDA, Lance Cheung)
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    Posted: 3/28/2012 5:30:47 AM EST
    LaSalle Dudley talks to a reporter at a meeting where black farmers were filing claim applications related to a settlement of their lawsuit against the Agriculture Department, in Memphis, Tenn. Black farmers had sued the department, claiming discrimination in USDA loan applications from 1981 to 1996. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
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    Posted: 3/28/2012 5:30:47 AM EST
    In a Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012 photo, black farmers and their relatives file claim applications related to a settlement of their lawsuit against the Agriculture Department in Memphis, Tenn. Black farmers had sued the department, claiming discrimination in USDA loan application from 1981 to 1996 (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
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    Posted: 3/28/2012 5:30:47 AM EST
    TO MOVE AT 3AM WEDNESDAY MARCH 28, 2012 -- In a Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012 photo, lawyer Rose Sanders, right, helps a family fill out a claim application related to a settlement in a lawsuit between black farmers and the Agriculture Department in Memphis, Tenn. Black farmers had sued the department, claiming discrimination in USDA loan application from 1981 to 1996. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)


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