U.S. Government Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Senate Appropriations Committee member, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee listen to testimony on C

    FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Senate Appropriations Committee member, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee listen to testimony on C

    Posted: 6/13/2013 5:28:09 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Senate Appropriations Committee member, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee listen to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington where Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command testified before the Senate Appropriations Committee. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone calls and online life? And whether all of this really helps find terrorists? Good luck finding solid answers. Americans trying to wrap their minds around two giant surveillance programs are confronted with a mishmash of leaks, changing claims and secrecy. Congress members complain their constituents are baffled _ and many lawmakers admit they are, too. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              FILE - In this April 18, 2013 file photo, National Intelligence Director James Clapper prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know a

    FILE - In this April 18, 2013 file photo, National Intelligence Director James Clapper prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know a

    Posted: 6/13/2013 5:28:09 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 18, 2013 file photo, National Intelligence Director James Clapper prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone calls and online life? And whether all of this really helps find terrorists? Good luck finding solid answers. Americans trying to wrap their minds around two giant surveillance programs are confronted with a mishmash of leaks, changing claims and secrecy. Congress members complain their constituents are baffled _ and many lawmakers admit they are, too. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service testifies on Capit

    FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service testifies on Capit

    Posted: 6/13/2013 5:28:09 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone calls and online life? And whether all of this really helps find terrorists? Good luck finding solid answers. Americans trying to wrap their minds around two giant surveillance programs are confronted with a mishmash of leaks, changing claims and secrecy. Congress members complain their constituents are baffled _ and many lawmakers admit they are, too. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE - In this June 10, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone

    FILE - In this June 10, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone

    Posted: 6/13/2013 5:28:09 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 10, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Wondering what the U.S. government might know about your phone calls and online life? And whether all of this really helps find terrorists? Good luck finding solid answers. Americans trying to wrap their minds around two giant surveillance programs are confronted with a mishmash of leaks, changing claims and secrecy. Congress members complain their constituents are baffled _ and many lawmakers admit they are, too. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
  •  - FBI Director Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington

    FBI Director Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Posted: 6/13/2013 11:15:44 AM EST
    FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Federal Bureau of Investigation oversight on Capitol Hill in Washington June 13, 2013. The data in a massive U.S. government database of daily telephone records has been instrumental in identifying people who sought to harm Americans, Mueller said on Thursday. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - FBI Director Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington

    FBI Director Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Posted: 6/13/2013 11:15:44 AM EST
    FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Federal Bureau of Investigation oversight on Capitol Hill in Washington June 13, 2013. The data in a massive U.S. government database of daily telephone records has been instrumental in identifying people who sought to harm Americans, Mueller said on Thursday. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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              Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about U.S. surveillance programs, outside the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong Thursday, June 13

    Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about U.S. surveillance programs, outside the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong Thursday, June 13

    Posted: 6/13/2013 7:12:14 AM EST
    Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about U.S. surveillance programs, outside the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong Thursday, June 13, 2013 as they demand that U.S. government should make public the targeted people and institution in Hong Kong and apologize to those who are targeted. The news of Snowden's whereabouts, revealed by an editor of a local newspaper that interviewed him Wednesday, is the first since he went to ground Monday after checking out of his hotel in this autonomous Chinese territory. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
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              **CORRECTS TO THIRD SESSION**  Colombia's Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin attends the third session of the 43rd General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), in A

    **CORRECTS TO THIRD SESSION** Colombia's Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin attends the third session of the 43rd General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), in A

    Posted: 6/7/2013 3:04:20 PM EST
    **CORRECTS TO THIRD SESSION** Colombia's Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin attends the third session of the 43rd General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), in Antigua, Guatemala, Thursday, June 6, 2013. Latin American countries frustrated by the United States' refusal to change its drug war strategy will push at the OAS conference that began Tuesday for the U.S. government to start discussing alternative approaches to a fight that has killed tens of thousands in a region beset by drug cartels. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)