U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 5:07:02 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist inspects an eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 5:05:44 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist, inspects an eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 5:03:48 PM EST
    A sign at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository shows the numbers of requests for eagle parts in 2011 in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 5:03:45 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist, carries a highly decomposed eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 5:01:03 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist, inspects a highly decomposed eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:58:28 PM EST
    A Golden eagle is seen before an inspection at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:56:30 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist (background), inspects an eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012 as adult Golden eagle wing feathers ready for shipping are displayed in the foreground. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:54:04 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist, inspects an eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:52:24 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist, inspects the feathers around an eagle's foot at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:48:19 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist walks through a freezer containing eagles ready for shipment at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:46:35 PM EST
    Dennis Wiist, Wildlife Repository Specialist (background), inspects an eagle at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. The FedEx boxes are used to ship eagle parts to requesting Native American Indian tribes. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:43:49 PM EST
    Packages of eagle feathers are ready for shipping at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES

    Posted: 4/25/2012 4:40:53 PM EST
    A sign at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Eagle Repository shows the numbers of requests for eagle parts in 2011 in Commerce City, Colorado March 26, 2012. Eagles are sacrosanct for many tribes, and employees at the National Eagle Repository provide them with feathers, wings and talons - and in some cases whole carcasses - for religious rituals. But the Indians' demand outstrips the repository's supply. Each year the repository receives about 2,300 dead bald and golden eagles, gathered by wildlife agents and others. To match story USA-RELIGION/EAGLES REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
  •  - Northern pintail ducks flock to the wetlands of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge during their migrations in southern Oregon

    Northern pintail ducks flock to the wetlands of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge during their migrations in southern Oregon

    Posted: 4/18/2012 4:27:34 PM EST
    Northern pintail ducks flock to the wetlands of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge during their migrations in southern Oregon in this handout photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taken February 25, 2009. More than 10,000 migrating birds have died from an avian cholera outbreak blamed on reduced water flows through vast marshlands of southern Oregon and northern California known as Western Everglades, federal wildlife officials said. Avian cholera, which poses virtually no risk to human health, surfaces in the region nearly every year in wetlands of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge, but the recent waterfowl die-off there is the worst in over a decade, said Matt Baun, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. REUTERS/US Fish and Wildlife Service/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 11:55:47 PM EST
    FILE - This March 7, 2006 file photo shows a bald eagle takes flight from a tree overlooking the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Federal court records show the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to give an American Indian tribe in Wyoming a permit to kill two bald eagles this year for religious purposes. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
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    Posted: 2/15/2012 1:25:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011, biologist Jim Duquesnel sets out pieces of fruit to attract iguanas at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys. For more than a year Duquesnel has traversed Bahia Honda State Park with two hopes. First, he wanted to see a Miami blue butterfly. Second, he wanted to rid the Florida Keys outpost of as many iguanas as he could. No confirmed Miami blues have been seen on Bahia Honda since July 2010. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last August issued an emergency listing of the Miami blue as an endangered species. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
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    Posted: 2/15/2012 1:25:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011, biologist Jim Duquesnel sets out traps containing pieces of fruit to trap iguanas at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys. For more than a year Duquesnel has traversed Bahia Honda State Park with two hopes. First, he wanted to see a Miami blue butterfly. Second, he wanted to rid the Florida Keys outpost of as many iguanas as he could. No confirmed Miami blues have been seen on Bahia Honda since July 2010. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last August issued an emergency listing of the Miami blue as an endangered species. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
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    Posted: 2/15/2012 1:25:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, biologist Jim Duquesnel, right, walks with volunteer Larry Benvenuti, left, as they do a tally of butterflies at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys. For more than a year Duquesnel has traversed Bahia Honda State Park with two hopes. First, he wanted to see a Miami blue butterfly. Second, he wanted to rid the Florida Keys outpost of as many iguanas as he could. No confirmed Miami blues have been seen on Bahia Honda since July 2010. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last August issued an emergency listing of the Miami blue as an endangered species. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
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    Posted: 2/15/2012 1:25:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, volunteer Larry Benvenuti carries a clipboard with a picture of the Miami blue butterfly at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys. No confirmed Miami blues have been seen on Bahia Honda since July 2010. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last August issued an emergency listing of the Miami blue as an endangered species. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
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    Posted: 2/15/2012 1:25:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, a sign hangs at biologist Jim Duquesnel's work area where he makes iguana traps at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys. For more than a year Duquesnel has traversed Bahia Honda State Park with two hopes. First, he wanted to see a Miami blue butterfly. Second, he wanted to rid the Florida Keys outpost of as many iguanas as he could. No confirmed Miami blues have been seen on Bahia Honda since July 2010. ( The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last August issued an emergency listing of the Miami blue as an endangered species. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)