Transparency Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 1/12/2012 4:25:49 PM EST
    Penn State University President Rodney Erickson, top left, and moderator Patty Satalia of WPSU-TV listen to a question from an alumnus during a town hall meeting with alumni in Pittsburgh, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012. Erickson was grilled Wednesday by alumni unhappy about how the school handled a child sex abuse scandal, the firing of longtime football coach Joe Paterno and a lack of transparency over the case. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
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    Posted: 1/12/2012 4:25:49 PM EST
    Penn State University President Rodney Erickson, left, listens to a question from an alumnus during a town hall meeting with alumni in Pittsburgh, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012. Erickson was grilled by alumni unhappy about how the school handled a child sex abuse scandal, the firing of longtime football coach Joe Paterno and a lack of transparency over the case. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
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    Posted: 1/12/2012 4:25:49 PM EST
    Penn State University President Rodney Erickson, left, talks with an alumnus after holding a town hall meeting with alumni in Pittsburgh, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012. Erickson was grilled Wednesday by alumni unhappy about how the school handled a child sex abuse scandal, the firing of longtime football coach Joe Paterno and a lack of transparency over the case. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
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    Posted: 1/5/2012 12:55:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2010 file photo German President Christian Wulff reacts during a joint news conference with the President of Poland, Bronislaw Komorowski, at the Bellevue palace in Berlin, Germany. Germany's biggest-selling newspaper is challenging an assertion by the country's president that he didn't try to prevent it publishing a report on a controversial private loan. President Christian Wulff has faced intense pressure since it emerged that he left an angry message on the voicemail of Bild newspaper's editor-in-chief Kai Diekmann Dec. 12 - the day before the story appeared. Wulff insisted in a television interview Wednesday Jan. 5, 2012 he hadn't tried to block the report and had merely asked for it to be delayed by a day so he could respond. But Diekmann expressed "astonishment" about that in a letter to Wulff on Thursday, seen by the AP. He says Bild wants to publish the text of the message but would like Wulff's approval "in the spirit of transparency you have spoken of." (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)
  •  - People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    Posted: 1/2/2012 10:59:03 AM EST
    A child sings as people demand for transparency from the National Transitional Council (NTC) and its head Mustafa Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi, December 16, 2011. REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori
  •  - People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    Posted: 1/2/2012 10:58:50 AM EST
    A child sings as people demand for transparency from the National Transitional Council (NTC) and its head Mustafa Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi, December 16, 2011. REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori
  •  - Demonstrators holding placards call for transparency in the National Transitional Council during a rally in Misrata

    Demonstrators holding placards call for transparency in the National Transitional Council during a rally in Misrata

    Posted: 12/19/2011 6:25:25 PM EST
    Demonstrators holding placards call for transparency in the National Transitional Council during a rally in Misrata December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:57:03 AM EST
    A woman sweeps the floor at the Laos Security Exchange building in Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:55:09 AM EST
    A Buddhist monk uses a mobile phone in central Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:52:30 AM EST
    A three wheel taxi driver waits for customers in Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:50:35 AM EST
    People stroll in central Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:48:44 AM EST
    A man drives a military style vehicle past a building under construction in central Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:45:40 AM EST
    A Lao Airlines airplane is parked at the tarmac of Vientiane's airport November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:44:26 AM EST
    A man wears a face mask as he takes a break from work at a construction site in central Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:43:07 AM EST
    A man stands beside a truck loaded with Beer Lao in central Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:40:51 AM EST
    A three wheel taxi drives past the Laos Security Exchange building in Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/18/2011 3:39:02 AM EST
    A security guard makes coffee inside the Laos Security Exchange building in Vientiane November 7, 2011. Little has changed in Laos' one-party political system and its rulers are trying to emulate the market-based authoritarianism of China and Vietnam with pro-business reforms, with some success. The once fragile economy has grown an average 7.9 percent a year since 2006. Laos's $7.5 billion economy is dwarfed by its neighbours -- 790 times smaller than China's, a 14th of the size of Vietnam's, and roughly two percent of Thailand -- but it has more than doubled since 2006, as has GDP per capita, which jumped from $600 to $1,200, according to World Bank data. But it's still off the radar to Western companies concerned about regulation, labour capacity, a lack of transparency and Laos's very cosy political and business ties to its neighbours. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature LAOS-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Martin Petty (LAOS - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Musician Al-Baser joins residents protesting against the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil for transparency in the city center of Benghazi

    Musician Al-Baser joins residents protesting against the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil for transparency in the city center of Benghazi

    Posted: 12/16/2011 1:07:13 PM EST
    Musician Masohd Al-Baser (2nd L) joins residents protesting against the National Transitional Council and its head Mustafa Abdel Jalil for transparency in the city center of Benghazi December 16, 2011. REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    People demand for transparency from the NTC and its head Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi

    Posted: 12/16/2011 1:02:18 PM EST
    A child sings as people demand for transparency from the National Transitional Council (NTC) and its head Mustafa Abdel Jalil during a protest in the city center of Benghazi December 16, 2011. REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - An assistant judge reads the sentence in a corruption case against former leftist PM Nastase, during a court session in Bucharest

    An assistant judge reads the sentence in a corruption case against former leftist PM Nastase, during a court session in Bucharest

    Posted: 12/15/2011 7:00:34 AM EST
    Assistant Judge Silvia Stoenescu reads the sentence in a corruption case against former leftist Prime Minister Adrian Nastase, during a court session in Bucharest December 15, 2011. Romania's top court acquitted Nastase, 61, on Thursday of a corruption charge dating from his 2000-2004 period in office, a judge said. He was accused of making a senior state appointment in return for help in covering up fraud in Romania, which watchdog Transparency International says is the EU's third most graft-prone state after Greece and Bulgaria. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)