The New York Times Photos on Townhall

  •  - Employees walk outside a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    Employees walk outside a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    Posted: 4/21/2012 8:24:37 PM EST
    Employees walk outside a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City April 21, 2012. U.S. retail giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc squelched its own internal investigation of allegations made by a former executive of its subsidiary in Mexico that the Mexican division had orchestrated a campaign of bribery to grab market dominance, the New York Times reported on Saturday. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya (MEXICO - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - People walk past a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    People walk past a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    Posted: 4/21/2012 7:33:32 PM EST
    People walk past a Wal-Mart store with a banner reading "Low prices, every day, in everything" in Mexico City April 21, 2012. U.S. retail giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc squelched its own internal investigation of allegations made by a former executive of its subsidiary in Mexico that the Mexican division had orchestrated a campaign of bribery to grab market dominance, the New York Times reported on Saturday. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya (MEXICO - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - File photo of a customer paying for merchandise at a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    File photo of a customer paying for merchandise at a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City

    Posted: 4/21/2012 6:24:50 PM EST
    A customer pays for merchandise at a Wal-Mart store in Mexico City in this November 17, 2011 file photo. U.S. retail giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc squelched its own internal investigation of allegations made by a former executive of its subsidiary in Mexico that the Mexican division had orchestrated a campaign of bribery to grab market dominance, the New York Times reported on April 21, 2012. REUTERS/Henry Romero/Files (MEXICO - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    Posted: 4/20/2012 3:18:39 PM EST
    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to sift through for evidence from a New York City apartment building where they were searching a basement for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz April 20, 2012. Police in New York City spent a second day on Friday tearing up the basement floor of a building in a downtown Manhattan neighborhood where a six-year-old Patz disappeared more than three decades ago. Police declined to say if there were new suspects in the case, but the New York Times quoted an unnamed law enforcement official as saying that authorities were looking at whether a handyman who used a workshop in the basement killed the boy and buried him there. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    Posted: 4/20/2012 3:17:17 PM EST
    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to sift through for evidence from a New York City apartment building where they were searching a basement for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz April 20, 2012. Police in New York City spent a second day on Friday tearing up the basement floor of a building in a downtown Manhattan neighborhood where a six-year-old Patz disappeared more than three decades ago. Police declined to say if there were new suspects in the case, but the New York Times quoted an unnamed law enforcement official as saying that authorities were looking at whether a handyman who used a workshop in the basement killed the boy and buried him there. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - Members of the media photograph FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in New York

    Members of the media photograph FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in New York

    Posted: 4/20/2012 3:15:35 PM EST
    Members of the media photograph FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to sift through for evidence from a New York City apartment building where they were searching a basement for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz April 20, 2012. Police in New York City spent a second day on Friday tearing up the basement floor of a building in a downtown Manhattan neighborhood where a six-year-old Patz disappeared more than three decades ago. Police declined to say if there were new suspects in the case, but the New York Times quoted an unnamed law enforcement official as saying that authorities were looking at whether a handyman who used a workshop in the basement killed the boy and buried him there. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    Posted: 4/20/2012 3:13:50 PM EST
    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to sift through for evidence from a New York City apartment building where they were searching a basement for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz April 20, 2012. Police in New York City spent a second day on Friday tearing up the basement floor of a building in a downtown Manhattan neighborhood where a six-year-old Patz disappeared more than three decades ago. Police declined to say if there were new suspects in the case, but the New York Times quoted an unnamed law enforcement official as saying that authorities were looking at whether a handyman who used a workshop in the basement killed the boy and buried him there. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to search for clues in the disappearance of Etan Patz in New York

    Posted: 4/20/2012 3:12:13 PM EST
    FBI agents and New York City police officers remove concrete to sift through for evidence from a New York City apartment building where they were searching a basement for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz April 20, 2012. Police in New York City spent a second day on Friday tearing up the basement floor of a building in a downtown Manhattan neighborhood where a six-year-old Patz disappeared more than three decades ago. Police declined to say if there were new suspects in the case, but the New York Times quoted an unnamed law enforcement official as saying that authorities were looking at whether a handyman who used a workshop in the basement killed the boy and buried him there. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - Vehicles drive past the New York Times headquarters in New York

    Vehicles drive past the New York Times headquarters in New York

    Posted: 4/19/2012 10:38:48 AM EST
    Vehicles drive past the New York Times headquarters in New York March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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    Posted: 4/12/2012 12:50:51 PM EST
    This image provided by the New York Times shows its April 16, 1912 front page coverage of the Titanic disaster. The largest ship afloat at the time, the Titanic sank in the north Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. It was a news story that would change the news. From the moment that a brief Associated Press dispatch relayed the wireless distress call _ "Titanic ... reported having struck an iceberg. The steamer said that immediate assistance was required" _ reporters and editors scrambled. In ways that seem familiar today, they adapted a dawning newsgathering technology and organized saturation coverage and managed to cover what one authority calls "the first really, truly international news event where anyone anywhere in the world could pick up a newspaper and read about it." (AP Photo/The New York Times)
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    Posted: 3/30/2012 5:05:46 PM EST
    In this 2007 photo provided by Cedar Crest College, Charles Snelling and his wife, Adrienne, receive an award from the college. The bodies of the Snellings, both 81, were found Thursday, March 29, 2012 in their home in Trexlertown in eastern Pennsylvania. Charles Snelling, who had recently written in The New York Times about his love for his Alzheimer's-stricken wife, killed her and himself in what their family called an act of "deep devotion." (AP Photo/Cedar Crest College)
  •  - GUARDS IN FRONT OF THE NEW YORK TIMES BUILDING.

    GUARDS IN FRONT OF THE NEW YORK TIMES BUILDING.

    Posted: 3/20/2012 9:29:00 AM EST
    A woman talks to guards at the entrance to the New York Times newspaper building in New York on June 5, 2003. REUTERS/Peter Morgan
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    Posted: 3/15/2012 5:45:47 AM EST
    FILE - This June 29, 2011 file photo, shows the headquarters building of Goldman Sachs, in New York. On Wednesday, March 14, 2012, Greg Smith, an executive director at the bank, resigned with a blistering editorial in the New York Times that accused the bank of losing its ?moral fiber,? putting profits ahead of customers' interests and dismissing customers as ?muppets.? (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
  •  - The facade of the New York Times building is seen in New York

    The facade of the New York Times building is seen in New York

    Posted: 3/9/2012 4:58:49 PM EST
    The facade of the New York Times building is seen in New York, November 29, 2010. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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    Posted: 3/3/2012 10:40:50 PM EST
    Nada Bakri, the widow of foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid, speaks at a memorial service for Shadid in Oklahoma City, Saturday, March 3, 2012. Shadid is pictured at rear in a large photograph taken of him on the streets of Cairo. Shadid, 43, died Feb. 16 reporting for The New York Times on the uprising against Syria?s president. He had an apparent asthma attack returning with smugglers from Syria to Turkey. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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    Posted: 3/3/2012 10:40:50 PM EST
    Buddy Shadid, the father of the late foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid, cries as he speaks at a memorial service for his son in Oklahoma City, Saturday, March 3, 2012. Behind him is a large photo of his son on the streets of Cairo. Shadid, 43, died Feb. 16 reporting for The New York Times on the uprising against Syria?s president. He had an apparent asthma attack returning with smugglers from Syria to Turkey. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
  •  - Turkish journalists demonstrate against the killings of journalists in Syria, in front of the Syrian Embassy in Ankara

    Turkish journalists demonstrate against the killings of journalists in Syria, in front of the Syrian Embassy in Ankara

    Posted: 2/24/2012 8:27:54 AM EST
    Turkish journalists hold portraits of (from R to L) American correspondent Marie Colvin, French photographer Remi Ochlik and American correspondent of Lebanese origin Anthony Shadid as they demonstrate against the killings of journalists in Syria, in front of the Syrian Embassy in Ankara February 24, 2012. Colvin and Ochlik were killed in the besieged Syrian city of Homs on Wednesday when rockets fired by government forces hit the house they were staying in, opposition activists and witnesses said. Shadid, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, died from a severe asthma attack in Syria, the New York Times said. REUTERS/Umit Bektas (TURKEY - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MEDIA)
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    Posted: 2/17/2012 7:55:46 PM EST
    This May 25, 2004 photo provided by The Washington Post shows then-Post reporter Anthony Shadid, in Washington. Shadid died Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, apparently of an asthma attack, while on assignment for the New York Times in Syria, the paper said. He was 43. (AP Photo/The Washington Post, Julia Ewan) MANDATORY CREDIT: THE WASHINGTON POST, JULIA EWAN
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    Posted: 2/17/2012 7:55:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 21, 2011 file photo provided by Turkish Foreign Ministry, four New York Times journalists, who had been held by Libya, seen with Turkish ambassador to Tripoli Levent Sahinkaya, center, at the Turkish embassy in Tripoli, Libya. Photographers Tyler Hicks, second left, and Lynsey Addario, second right, Anthony Shadid, right, and videographer Stephen Farrell pose after their release. Shadid died Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, apparently of an asthma attack, while on assignment for the New York Times in Syria, the paper said. He was 43.(AP Photo ( AP Photo/Turkish Foreign Ministry, File)
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    Posted: 2/17/2012 2:50:49 AM EST
    This Nov. 26, 2003 photo provided by The Washington Post shows then-Post reporter Anthony Shadid, left, and Baghdad bureau chief Rajiv Chandrasekaran, in Baghdad. Shadid died Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, apparently of an asthma attack, while on assignment for the New York Times in Syria, the paper said. He was 43. (AP Photo/The Washington Post, Bill O'Leary) MANDATORY CREDIT: THE WASHINGTON POST, BILL O'LEARY