Terrorism Photos on Townhall

  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 12:53:57 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:37:56 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:37:56 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:37:56 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:37:56 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:21:24 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:21:24 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:21:24 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 11:21:24 AM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2009, file photo, reviewed by the U.S. Military, a guard talks to a Guantanamo detainee in the open yard in Camp 4 detention center on the U.S. Naval Base in Gua

    FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2009, file photo, reviewed by the U.S. Military, a guard talks to a Guantanamo detainee in the open yard in Camp 4 detention center on the U.S. Naval Base in Gua

    Posted: 6/7/2013 3:29:11 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2009, file photo, reviewed by the U.S. Military, a guard talks to a Guantanamo detainee in the open yard in Camp 4 detention center on the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Five years into his presidency, President Barack Obama presides over a national security apparatus that in many ways still resembles the one left behind by President George W. Bush. Drones are killing terrorism suspects, the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, holds "enemy combatants," and the government secretly collects telephone records of millions of Americans. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
  •  - 
              Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 6, 2013, before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee as lawmakers examine the budget for the Justice

    Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 6, 2013, before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee as lawmakers examine the budget for the Justice

    Posted: 6/7/2013 3:29:11 AM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 6, 2013, before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee as lawmakers examine the budget for the Justice Department. Five years into his presidency, Barack Obama presides over a national security apparatus that in many ways still resembles the one left behind by President George W. Bush. Drones are killing terrorism suspects, the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, holds "enemy combatants," and the government secretly collects telephone records of millions of Americans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  •  - 
              FILE - A sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md., Thursday, June 6, 2013. Five years into his presidency, Barack Obama presides over a n

    FILE - A sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md., Thursday, June 6, 2013. Five years into his presidency, Barack Obama presides over a n

    Posted: 6/7/2013 3:29:11 AM EST
    FILE - A sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md., Thursday, June 6, 2013. Five years into his presidency, Barack Obama presides over a national security apparatus that in many ways still resembles the one left behind by President George W. Bush. Drones are killing terrorism suspects, the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, holds "enemy combatants," and the government secretly collects telephone records of millions of Americans. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this May 23, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about national security, at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington. Five years into his presid

    FILE - In this May 23, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about national security, at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington. Five years into his presid

    Posted: 6/7/2013 3:29:11 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 23, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about national security, at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington. Five years into his presidency, Obama presides over a national security apparatus that in many ways still resembles the one left behind by President George W. Bush. Drones are killing terrorism suspects, the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, holds "enemy combatants," and the government secretly collects telephone records of millions of Americans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
  •  - Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Cohen speaks about HSBC during a news conference in New York

    Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Cohen speaks about HSBC during a news conference in New York

    Posted: 6/4/2013 11:25:40 AM EST
    Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David S. Cohen speaks during a news conference at the Conrad B. Duberstein U.S. Bankruptcy Courthouse in New York December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Joshua Lott