Terrorism Photos on Townhall

  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - 
              Pedestrians pass the Apple store location on fifth avenue Thursday, June 6, 2013, in New York. A leaked document has laid bare the scope of the government's surveillance of Americans' p

    Pedestrians pass the Apple store location on fifth avenue Thursday, June 6, 2013, in New York. A leaked document has laid bare the scope of the government's surveillance of Americans' p

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:17:59 PM EST
    Pedestrians pass the Apple store location on fifth avenue Thursday, June 6, 2013, in New York. A leaked document has laid bare the scope of the government's surveillance of Americans' phone records — hundreds of millions of calls — in the first hard evidence of a massive data collection program aimed at combating terrorism under powers granted by Congress after the 9/11 attacks. In statements, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo said they only provide the government with user data required under the law. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 6:19:08 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski