taxpayers Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 1/25/2012 12:10:51 PM EST
    Customer looks at a copy of TurboTax on sale at Costco in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012. The software available for the 2012 tax season has been both beefed up and made easier to use. This will make the annual chore quicker, and lessen the chances of the missing big deductions and important tax credits. Close to 40 million taxpayers prepared their own returns online last year. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
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    Posted: 1/18/2012 8:30:48 PM EST
    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a large gathering in Voorhees, N.J., during a town hall meeting Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. One day after his State Of the State Address, Christie is taking his proposed across-the-board 10 percent income tax cut to New Jersey taxpayers with a town hall appearance. He'll be trying to sell New Jersey as a place where the government has turned around and himself as the architect of it. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
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    Posted: 12/17/2011 12:40:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 13, 2008 file photo show the Freddie Mac headquarters in McLean, Va. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged six former top executives at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with civil fraud, saying they misled the government and taxpayers about risky subprime mortgages the mortgage giants held during the housing bust. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
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    Posted: 12/17/2011 12:40:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 2, 2007 file photo shows Fannie Mae's building in Washington. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged six former top executives at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with civil fraud, saying they misled the government and taxpayers about risky subprime mortgages the mortgage giants held during the housing bust. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, file)
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    Posted: 12/17/2011 12:40:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2008 file photo, former Freddie Mac CEO Richard Syron, left, and former Fannie Mae CEO Daniel Mudd wait to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has brought civil fraud charges against six former top executives at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, saying they misled the government and taxpayers about risky subprime mortgages the mortgage giants held during the housing bust. Those charged include the agencies' two former CEOs, Fannie's Daniel Mudd and Freddie's Richard Syron. They are the highest-profile individuals to be charged in connection with the 2008 financial crisis. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 12/10/2011 2:50:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 25, 1979, file photo Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, second from left, Rep. George Hansen, R-Idaho, left, and other members of Congress gather around a truck loaded with 44,300 simulated gold bricks in Washington to indicate their strong opposition to the estimated $4.1 billion dollars it will cost the U.S. taxpayers to give away the Panama Canal. Long before Paul discovered Friedrich Hayek and other free-market economists, he got a lesson in sound money from his oldest brother, Bill. At the height of World War II the Paul boys were laying aside quarters from their Pittsburgh Press routes and pooling pennies earned from pulling dirty milk bottles off the line at the family dairy to buy war bonds. One day, Ronnie suggested what was, in retrospect, a rather Keynesian solution: "Why doesn't the government just PRINT this money?" Well," Bill responded, "then the money wouldn't have any value." (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 5:10:52 PM EST
    In this Nov. 17, 2011 photo, New York City police officers are deployed before demonstrators affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement march through the streets of the financial district in New York. A survey by The Associated Press shows that since the protests began, the Occupy Wall Street protests have cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in the 18 cities with active protests. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 5:10:52 PM EST
    File -- In this file photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011, an Occupy Boston protester shakes hands with a police officer after a rally in Boston's financial district. In the first two months of the nationwide Occupy Wall Street protests the movement has cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in police overtime and other municipal services, according to a survey conducted by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 5:10:52 PM EST
    File -- In this Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 file photo Occupy Boston protesters gather outside a building in the Financial district in Boston as law enforcement officials look on at left. In the first two months of the nationwide Occupy Wall Street protests the movement has cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in police overtime and other municipal services, according to a survey conducted by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 5:10:52 PM EST
    FILE- In this Nov. 15, 2011 file photo, police officers disperse Occupy Wall Street protesters near the encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York. A survey by the Associated Press shows that since the protests began, the Occupy Wall Street protests have cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in the 18 cities with active protests. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 6:20:54 AM EST
    FILE- In this Nov. 3, 2011 file photo, motorcycle police keep Occupy Wall Street protesters on the sidewalk as they march to Goldman Sachs headquarters in New York. A survey by the Associated Press shows that since the protests began, the Occupy Wall Street protests have cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in the 18 cities with active protests. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 9:55:46 PM EST
    FILE - This Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 file photo shows an auction sign at the bankrupt Solyndra headquarters in Fremont, Calif. before an auction. Newly released emails show that, contrary to White House claims, a major donor to President Barack Obama pushed for a loan to a solar energy company that later went bankrupt. The donor, George Kaiser, pushed White House and Energy Department officials for a second loan for Solyndra Inc. in 2010, after the California company had already received a $528 million loan in 2009, the emails show. The second loan was not approved. Instead, an investment venture controlled by Kaiser made a private loan that resulted in the firm and other investors moving ahead of taxpayers in line for repayment in case of a default by Solyndra. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
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    Posted: 9/16/2011 12:30:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2011, file photo, Solyndra workers leave Solyndra in Fremont, Calif. Leaders of a House panel say they plan to make Obama administration officials answer for putting taxpayers on the hook for a half-billion dollar loan that went to a now-bankrupt solar panel manufacturer. The panel is conducting a hearing Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011, that will examine what went wrong with the company which had received a federal loan of nearly $528 million and recently filed for bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
  •  - To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    Posted: 8/31/2011 5:36:20 AM EST
    THIS PICTURE IS SEVEN OF 7 TO ACCOMPANY INSIGHT: FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN . SEARCH IN YOUR PICTURE SYSTEM FOR KEYWORD "FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN" TO SEE ALL IMAGES. A journalist examines a copy of Lord Penrose's "Report of the Equitable Life Inquiry", outside British Treasury offices, London in this March 8, 2004 file photograph. The UK's Financial Services Authority, which is to be scrapped next year after presiding over a catalogue of scandals from mis-sold financial products, will then be reborn in multiple forms. One, the Financial Conduct Authority, will have new powers to oversee the City and crack down on market abuses from the start of 2013. A tougher regulatory line is politically overdue. The FSA was accused of turning a blind eye to the bad debts racked up by many of Britain's top banks, which left taxpayers with a 1.3 trillion pound bill and firms including Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland owned by the state. Even before the financial crisis, the regulator
  •  - To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    Posted: 8/31/2011 5:32:21 AM EST
    THIS PICTURE IS SIX OF 7 TO ACCOMPANY INSIGHT: FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN . SEARCH IN YOUR PICTURE SYSTEM FOR KEYWORD "FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN" TO SEE ALL IMAGES. A man passes a Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) branch in the City of London in this October 13, 2008 file photograph. The UK's Financial Services Authority, which is to be scrapped next year after presiding over a catalogue of scandals from mis-sold financial products, will then be reborn in multiple forms. One, the Financial Conduct Authority, will have new powers to oversee the City and crack down on market abuses from the start of 2013. A tougher regulatory line is politically overdue. The FSA was accused of turning a blind eye to the bad debts racked up by many of Britain's top banks, which left taxpayers with a 1.3 trillion pound bill and firms including Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland owned by the state. Picture taken October 13, 2008. To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN REUTERS/Luke
  •  - To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    Posted: 8/31/2011 5:30:30 AM EST
    THIS PICTURE IS FIVE OF 7 TO ACCOMPANY INSIGHT: FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN . SEARCH IN YOUR PICTURE SYSTEM FOR KEYWORD "FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN" TO SEE ALL IMAGES. A woman uses an ATM at a Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) branch in the City of London in this November 5, 2010 file photograph. The UK's Financial Services Authority, which is to be scrapped next year after presiding over a catalogue of scandals from mis-sold financial products, will then be reborn in multiple forms. One, the Financial Conduct Authority, will have new powers to oversee the City and crack down on market abuses from the start of 2013. A tougher regulatory line is politically overdue. The FSA was accused of turning a blind eye to the bad debts racked up by many of Britain's top banks, which left taxpayers with a 1.3 trillion pound bill and firms including Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland owned by the state. Picture taken November 5, 2010. To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN
  •  - To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    Posted: 8/31/2011 5:28:48 AM EST
    THIS PICTURE IS FOUR OF 7 TO ACCOMPANY INSIGHT: FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN . SEARCH IN YOUR PICTURE SYSTEM FOR KEYWORD "FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN" TO SEE ALL IMAGES. A pedestrian walks past a branch of the Northern Rock bank in central London in this August 4, 2009 file photograph. The UK's Financial Services Authority, which is to be scrapped next year after presiding over a catalogue of scandals from mis-sold financial products, will then be reborn in multiple forms. One, the Financial Conduct Authority, will have new powers to oversee the City and crack down on market abuses from the start of 2013. A tougher regulatory line is politically overdue. The FSA was accused of turning a blind eye to the bad debts racked up by many of Britain's top banks, which left taxpayers with a 1.3 trillion pound bill and firms including Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland owned by the state. Picture taken August 4, 2009. To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN REUTERS/Stefan
  •  - To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN

    Posted: 8/31/2011 5:27:40 AM EST
    THIS PICTURE IS THREE OF 7 TO ACCOMPANY INSIGHT: FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN . SEARCH IN YOUR PICTURE SYSTEM FOR KEYWORD "FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN" TO SEE ALL IMAGES. Pedestrians walk past a branch of the Northern Rock bank in the City of London in this February 23, 2009 handout photograph. The UK's Financial Services Authority, which is to be scrapped next year after presiding over a catalogue of scandals from mis-sold financial products, will then be reborn in multiple forms. One, the Financial Conduct Authority, will have new powers to oversee the City and crack down on market abuses from the start of 2013. A tougher regulatory line is politically overdue. The FSA was accused of turning a blind eye to the bad debts racked up by many of Britain's top banks, which left taxpayers with a 1.3 trillion pound bill and firms including Northern Rock and Royal Bank of Scotland owned by the state. Picture taken February 23, 2009. To match Insight FINANCE/REGULATION-BRITAIN
  •  - A man walks in front of a row of closed shops in central Athens

    A man walks in front of a row of closed shops in central Athens

    Posted: 6/24/2011 6:37:15 AM EST
    A man walks in front of a row of closed shops in central Athens June 24, 2011. Greeks seething after two years of belt-tightening reacted in anger against a new round of tax rises and spending cuts worth some 3.8 billion euros which they said would again hit honest taxpayers hardest. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - A woman and a child stand outside a shop window in central Athens

    A woman and a child stand outside a shop window in central Athens

    Posted: 6/24/2011 6:33:12 AM EST
    A woman and a child stand outside a shop window in central Athens June 24, 2011. Greeks seething after two years of belt-tightening reacted in anger against a new round of tax rises and spending cuts worth some 3.8 billion euros which they said would again hit honest taxpayers hardest. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)