taxpayers Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              Dozens of men, many of them Mexican citizens, eat a modest dinner at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it

    Dozens of men, many of them Mexican citizens, eat a modest dinner at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:33:34 AM EST
    Dozens of men, many of them Mexican citizens, eat a modest dinner at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it to the United States, by illegally crossing the border, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012, in Nogales, Mexico. The U.S. government has halted flights home for Mexicans caught entering the country illegally in the deadly summer heat of Arizona's deserts, a money-saving move that ends a seven-year experiment that cost taxpayers nearly $100 million.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
  •  - 
              Dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at tr

    Dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at tr

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:33:34 AM EST
    Dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it to the United States, by illegally crossing the border, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012, in Nogales, Mexico. The U.S. government has halted flights home for Mexicans caught entering the country illegally in the deadly summer heat of Arizona's deserts, a money-saving move that ends a seven-year experiment that cost taxpayers nearly $100 million.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
  •  - 
              Antonio Perez, bottom, joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they relax in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decision

    Antonio Perez, bottom, joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they relax in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decision

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:33:33 AM EST
    Antonio Perez, bottom, joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they relax in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it to the United States, by illegally crossing the border, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012, in Nogales, Mexico. The U.S. government has halted flights home for Mexicans caught entering the country illegally in the deadly summer heat of Arizona's deserts, a money-saving move that ends a seven-year experiment that cost taxpayers nearly $100 million.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
  •  - 
              Antonio Perez joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whe

    Antonio Perez joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whe

    Posted: 9/10/2012 4:33:33 AM EST
    Antonio Perez joins dozens of immigrants, many of them Mexican citizens, as they gather in sleeping quarters at a well known immigrant shelter, as many are making tough decisions on whether to try their luck at trying to make it to the United States, by illegally crossing the border, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012, in Nogales, Mexico. The U.S. government has halted flights home for Mexicans caught entering the country illegally in the deadly summer heat of Arizona's deserts, a money-saving move that ends a seven-year experiment that cost taxpayers nearly $100 million.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
  •  - File photo of Swiss President and Finance Minister Widmer-Schlumpf and Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern

    File photo of Swiss President and Finance Minister Widmer-Schlumpf and Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:52:00 AM EST
    Swiss President and Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf (L) speaking to Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern in this May 9, 2012 file photo. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. REUTERS/Ernst Kehrli/Files
  •  - File photo of U.S. Treasury Secretary Geithner and Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Shulman in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Treasury Secretary Geithner and Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Shulman in Washington

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:52:00 AM EST
    U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (R) thanking Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Doug Shulman for his remarks on Recovery Act tax cuts at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington in this March 22, 2010 file photo. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. However, Washington must factor forthcoming elections into its thinking. Several key U.S. officials plan to step down, which could mean negotiations having to be reset. Shulman and Geithner are both scheduled to depart after the election. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, credited by Swiss officials with helping negotiations over a settlement for UBS in 2009, is also leaving her job. REUTERS/Jim Young/Files
  •  - File photo of lightning over headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm in Zurich

    File photo of lightning over headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm in Zurich

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:52:00 AM EST
    Lightning strike over the headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm over the Paradeplatz square in Zurich in this August 24, 2011 file photo. Swiss banks hoping to atone for decades of complicity in tax evasion may be left to sweat it out for months as the United States and Germany ponder the right level of punishment. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/Files
  •  - File photo of Swiss President and Finance Minister Widmer-Schlumpf and Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern

    File photo of Swiss President and Finance Minister Widmer-Schlumpf and Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:23:24 AM EST
    Swiss President and Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf (L) speaking to Swiss Secretary of State in the finance department Michael Ambuehl before a news conference in Bern in this May 9, 2012 file photo. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. REUTERS/Ernst Kehrli/Files
  •  - File photo of U.S. Treasury Secretary Geithner and Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Shulman in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Treasury Secretary Geithner and Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Shulman in Washington

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:23:24 AM EST
    U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (R) thanking Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Doug Shulman for his remarks on Recovery Act tax cuts at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington in this March 22, 2010 file photo. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. However, Washington must factor forthcoming elections into its thinking. Several key U.S. officials plan to step down, which could mean negotiations having to be reset. Shulman and Geithner are both scheduled to depart after the election. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, credited by Swiss officials with helping negotiations over a settlement for UBS in 2009, is also leaving her job. REUTERS/Jim Young/Files
  •  - File photo of lightning over headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm in Zurich

    File photo of lightning over headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm in Zurich

    Posted: 8/12/2012 8:23:24 AM EST
    Lightning strike over the headquarters of Swiss banks UBS and Credit Suisse during a thunderstorm over the Paradeplatz square in Zurich in this August 24, 2011 file photo. Swiss banks hoping to atone for decades of complicity in tax evasion may be left to sweat it out for months as the United States and Germany ponder the right level of punishment. Switzerland has long dodged U.S. accusations of hiding money for wealthy Americans. But now eleven Swiss banks are under investigation in the United States and there is pressure too from Europe where burdened taxpayers want scalps after numerous banking scandals. The Swiss need a deal to remove the taint from their financial industry. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/Files
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Sept. 16,2011 file photo the Exterior of solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra is seen in Fremont, Calif. Republicans overseeing the investigation of the federal government’s

    FILE - In this Sept. 16,2011 file photo the Exterior of solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra is seen in Fremont, Calif. Republicans overseeing the investigation of the federal government’s

    Posted: 8/2/2012 5:33:41 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 16,2011 file photo the Exterior of solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra is seen in Fremont, Calif. Republicans overseeing the investigation of the federal government’s investment of the bankrupt solar-panel maker have concluded that federal agencies identified a variety of red flags about the soundness of a now-bankrupt solar panel manufacturer, but allowed the government’s investment in the company to proceed anyway, eventually leaving taxpayers on the hook for more than $500 million. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma,File)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/9/2012 9:40:47 AM EST
    FILE-In this Oct. 25, 2007, file photo, Boston Red Sox's Curt Schilling pitches against the Colorado Rockies in Game 2 of the baseball World Series at Fenway Park in Boston. Schilling has dabbled in politics, World War II history and raised millions for Lou Gehrig's disease, but it's a gamble on his video game company 38 studios that is in danger of failing and possibly leaving Rhode Island taxpayers with the tab on a $75 million loan guarantee that lured the firm from Massachusetts in 2010. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/7/2012 1:40:54 PM EST
    FILE- In this May 21, 2012, file photo, former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, center, is followed by members of the media as he departs the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation headquarters in Providence, R.I. Schilling has dabbled in politics, World War II history and raised millions for Lou Gehrig's disease, but it's a gamble on his video game company 38 studios that is in danger of failing and possibly leaving Rhode Island taxpayers with the tab on a $75 million loan guarantee that lured the firm from Massachusetts in 2010. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/4/2012 4:25:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2007 file photo, Republican presidential hopeful, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, listens as he receives an endorsement from Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, during a campaign stop in Manchester, N.H. Schilling has dabbled in politics, World War II history and raised millions for Lou Gehrig's disease, but it's a gamble on his video game company 38 studios that is in danger of failing and possibly leaving Rhode Island taxpayers with the tab on a $75 million loan guarantee that lured the firm from Massachusetts in 2010. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/4/2012 4:25:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2004 file photo, Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling tends to his right ankle during the third inning of game 6 of the ALCS against the New York Yankees in New York. Schilling has dabbled in politics, World War II history and raised millions for Lou Gehrig's disease, but it's a gamble on his video game company 38 studios that is in danger of failing and possibly leaving Rhode Island taxpayers with the tab on a $75 million loan guarantee that lured the firm from Massachusetts in 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/19/2012 3:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 25, 2011 file photo, Shirley Waits sits outside her mother's home and waits for an insurance adjuster to arrive, in Joplin , Mo., after a massive tornado moved through Joplin three days earlier, leveling much of the city. The tornado that tore through Joplin a year ago already ranks as the deadliest twister in six decades. Now it carries another distinction _ the costliest since at least 1950. Insurance policies are expected to cover most of the $2.8 billion in damage. But records obtained by The Associated Press show taxpayers could supply $500 million. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/16/2012 2:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2008 file photo, Cuyahoga County prosecutor Bill Mason answers during a news conference in Cleveland. Mason pursues dozens of offenders on capital charges each year at added expense to taxpayers and at the risk of some defendants ending up on death row for charges that would be minor elsewhere. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
  •  - A 2011 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return form is seen in New York

    A 2011 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return form is seen in New York

    Posted: 5/15/2012 10:13:49 PM EST
    A 2011 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return form is seen in New York April 17, 2012. April 17 is the deadline for U.S. taxpayers to file their individual income tax returns and pay their taxes for the 2011 calendar year. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
  •  -
    Posted: 4/26/2012 2:10:46 PM EST
    FILE In this Jan. 30, 2008 file photo, Air Force One casts a shadow on an expressway before landing at Los Angeles International Airport. President George W. Bush traveled to the California, Nevada, Colorado and Nevada for the next two days to attend Republican fund raisers. President Barack Obama flies Air Force One when he leaves town. So does Candidate Barack Obama. The distinction between the two roles for Obama matters because it helps determine who foots the bill for his travel. Either way, though, it's a safe bet that taxpayers are on the hook for at least part of the tab. Operating under the same rules that have governed presidential travel dating back to the Reagan years, Obama must reimburse the government for a portion of the costs associated with any political travel. But presidents of both parties have been secretive about the complicated mechanics. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/26/2012 1:55:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 25, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama's reflection can be seen on the steps as he boards Air Force One at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora, Colo. President Barack Obama flies Air Force One when he leaves town. So does Candidate Barack Obama. The distinction between the two roles for Obama matters because it helps determine who foots the bill for his travel. Either way, though, it's a safe bet that taxpayers are on the hook for at least part of the tab. Operating under the same rules that have governed presidential travel dating back to the Reagan years, Obama must reimburse the government for a portion of the costs associated with any political travel. But presidents of both parties have been secretive about the complicated mechanics. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)