Tax Hikes Photos on Townhall

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              Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy speaks during a control session at the Spanish Parliament, in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, July 11, 2012. Spain has announced a euro 65 billion austeri

    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy speaks during a control session at the Spanish Parliament, in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, July 11, 2012. Spain has announced a euro 65 billion austeri

    Posted: 7/11/2012 9:27:29 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy speaks during a control session at the Spanish Parliament, in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, July 11, 2012. Spain has announced a euro 65 billion austerity package that includes tax hikes and spending cuts a day after winning approval from euro zone partners for a huge bailout of Spain’s banks. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
  •  - Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy gestures as he addresses the parliament in Madrid

    Spain's Prime Minister Rajoy gestures as he addresses the parliament in Madrid

    Posted: 7/11/2012 6:47:40 AM EST
    Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy gestures during a parliamentary session in Madrid, July 11, 2012. Rajoy said on Wednesday he would raise the value-added tax by 3 percentage points to 21 percent as part of a large package of tax hikes and spending cuts aimed at trimming the public budget by 65 billion euros over the next 2-1/2 years. With the economy in recession, unemployment high and tax income falling, Spain is struggling to meet tough deficit cutting targets that it has agreed on with the European Union. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
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    Posted: 6/18/2012 3:25:47 PM EST
    Radical Left party (SYRIZA) leader Alexis Tsipras waves to his supporters in front of Athens' university, Sunday, June 17, 2012. Alexis Tsipras and his party shot to prominence in the May 6 vote, where he came a surprise second and quadrupled his support since the 2009 election. Syriza party has vowed to rip up Greece's bailout agreements and repeal the austerity measures, which have included deep spending cuts on everything from health care to education and infrastructure, as well as tax hikes and reductions of salaries and pensions.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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    Posted: 6/18/2012 2:20:48 PM EST
    Head of Greece's radical left-wing Syriza party Alexis Tsipras speaks to his supporters in Athens, late Sunday, June 17, 2012. Alexis Tsipras and his party shot to prominence in the May 6 vote, where he came a surprise second and quadrupled his support since the 2009 election. Syriza party has vowed to rip up Greece's bailout agreements and repeal the austerity measures, which have included deep spending cuts on everything from health care to education and infrastructure, as well as tax hikes and reductions of salaries and pensions. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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    Posted: 6/18/2012 2:20:48 PM EST
    Supporters of Greece's radical left-wing Syriza party hold their party flags in front of Athens university, as they wait for head of the party Alexis Tsipras to speak, in Athens, late Sunday, June 17, 2012. Alexis Tsipras and his party shot to prominence in the May 6 vote, where he came a surprise second and quadrupled his support since the 2009 election. Syriza party has vowed to rip up Greece's bailout agreements and repeal the austerity measures, which have included deep spending cuts on everything from health care to education and infrastructure, as well as tax hikes and reductions of salaries and pensions. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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    Posted: 6/18/2012 2:20:47 PM EST
    Head of Greece's radical left-wing Syriza party Alexis Tsipras waves to his supporters in Athens, late Sunday, June 17, 2012. Alexis Tsipras and his party shot to prominence in the May 6 vote, where he came a surprise second and quadrupled his support since the 2009 election. Syriza party has vowed to rip up Greece's bailout agreements and repeal the austerity measures, which have included deep spending cuts on everything from health care to education and infrastructure, as well as tax hikes and reductions of salaries and pensions. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 10:15:51 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown releases details of his revised budget plan for the coming fiscal year Monday, May 14, 2012, in Los Angeles, just days after saying California faces a $16 billion deficit, almost double what he had predicted in January. Closing that shortfall would require cutting spending by an amount equal to roughly 17 percent of the state's general fund, but the Democratic governor is seeking a combination of cuts and tax hikes instead. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
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    Posted: 5/13/2012 12:00:49 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown looks through a box of petitions for his tax-hike initiative before submitting them to the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, May 10, 2012. Brown's initiative is one of two tax hike petitions that are expected to qualify for November ballot. Brown has warned that if voters do not pass the tax hikes there would be even deeper cuts to schools, higher education and social services. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/13/2012 12:00:49 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown looks through a box of petitions for his tax-hike initiative before submitting them to the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, May 10, 2012. Brown's initiative is one of two tax hike petitions that are expected to qualify for November ballot. Brown has warned that if voters do not pass the tax hikes there would be even deeper cuts to schools, higher education and social services. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/13/2012 12:00:48 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown and his wife, Anne Gust Brown watch Sacramento Registrar of Voters employees Jennifer Little, left, and Kristen Larsen, right, look over the papers for Brown's tax-hike initiative petitions he submitted at the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters office in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, May 10, 2012. More than 1.5 million signatures were collected to place Brown's initiative on November ballot. Brown has warned that if voters do not pass the tax hikes there would be even deeper cuts to schools, higher education and social services.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/13/2012 12:00:48 AM EST
    Surrounded by reporters and cameras, Gov. Jerry Brown and his wife, Anne Gust Brown turn in boxes of petitions for his tax-hike initiative at the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, May 10, 2012. Brown's initiative is one of two tax hike petitions that are expected to qualify for November ballot. Brown has warned that if voters do not pass the tax hikes there would be even deeper cuts to schools, higher education and social services. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/13/2012 12:00:48 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown discusses his tax-hike initiative before submitting the petitions for the initiative to the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, May 10, 2012. Brown's initiative is one of two tax hike petitions that are expected to qualify for November ballot. Brown has warned that if voters do not pass the tax hikes there would be even deeper cuts to schools, higher education and social services. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  - Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Posted: 4/6/2012 12:14:52 PM EST
    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce March 15, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Picture taken March 15, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION BUSINESS)
  •  - Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Posted: 4/6/2012 12:14:22 PM EST
    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce March 15, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Picture taken March 15, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION BUSINESS)
  •  - Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce

    Posted: 4/6/2012 12:13:28 PM EST
    Albanian textile workers sew clothes at a Greek-owned Greit Sh.p.k. factory in Albania's eastern town of Korce March 15, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Picture taken March 15, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION BUSINESS)
  •  - Artur Metaj speaks to an inquiring passer-by outside his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana

    Artur Metaj speaks to an inquiring passer-by outside his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana

    Posted: 4/6/2012 12:08:50 PM EST
    Artur Metaj, 37, speaks to an inquiring passer-by outside his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana April 2, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Arthuros is a commonly used Greek spelling of Artur. Picture taken April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Artur Metaj adjusts a mirror at his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana

    Artur Metaj adjusts a mirror at his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana

    Posted: 4/6/2012 11:58:25 AM EST
    Artur Metaj, 37, adjusts a mirror at his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana April 2, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Picture taken April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Artur Metaj, 37, and one of his assistants fix equipment in his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital Tirana

    Artur Metaj, 37, and one of his assistants fix equipment in his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital Tirana

    Posted: 4/6/2012 11:57:26 AM EST
    Artur Metaj, 37, and one of his assistants fix equipment at his hair styling shop in the Albanian capital,Tirana April 2, 2012. As the world watches Greeks try to cope with rising unemployment, tax hikes and plummeting salaries, a silent community of hundreds of thousands of Albanians - 60 percent of the migrant workforce in Greece - is weighing up its future. Picture taken April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Arben Celi (ALBANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES

    To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES

    Posted: 3/7/2012 9:03:14 AM EST
    Hamas customs officers in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip stand on sacks of cement smuggled into the Gaza Strip through tunnels dug beneath the frontier with Egypt March 3, 2012. Palestinian Islamist group Hamas faces growing discontent in its Gaza stronghold because of renewed tax hikes and the mismanagement of a power crisis that has led to lengthy blackouts across the coastal enclave.Traders who import goods from Israel and the West Bank say Hamas authorities have introduced additional fees beyond the usual tax they collect, putting their businesses at risk and threatening the livelihoods of thousands of workers. Picture taken March 3, 2012. To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa (GAZA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES

    To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES

    Posted: 3/7/2012 9:03:12 AM EST
    A Hamas customs officer in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip walks on steel bars smuggled into the Gaza Strip through tunnels dug beneath the frontier with Egypt March 3, 2012. Palestinian Islamist group Hamas faces growing discontent in its Gaza stronghold because of renewed tax hikes and the mismanagement of a power crisis that has led to lengthy blackouts across the coastal enclave.Traders who import goods from Israel and the West Bank say Hamas authorities have introduced additional fees beyond the usual tax they collect, putting their businesses at risk and threatening the livelihoods of thousands of workers. Picture taken March 3, 2012. To match Feature PALESTINIANS-HAMAS/TAXES REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa (GAZA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY BUSINESS)