Tax Code Photos on Townhall

  •  -
    Posted: 5/27/2012 11:55:51 AM EST
    In this May 17, 2012 photo, Richard Lowe loads a truck with mulch in Morrisville, Vt. Nursery owners and landscapers around Vermont have been getting big bills from the state recently for unpaid sales taxes on products like bark mulch and soil additives that many thought had an agricultural exemption from the 6 percent levy. Some are complaining that they were caught unaware of a change in the tax code made six years ago. ?You don?t just change the taxes and laws and not tell somebody,? said Lowe, owner of Green Mountain Landscaping in Morrisville, who is fighting $18,000 in bills for back taxes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  •  -
    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas speaks in Elko, Nev.Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2008 file photo, President George W. Bush speaks at the White House in Washington. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich campaigns in Las Vegas. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in Washington. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to supporters in Tampa, Fla. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - Steve Forbes speaks during a press conference ahead of Forbes Global CEO Conference 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in this Sept. 12, 2011 file photo. Forbes said Thursday Oct. 20, 2011 that Texas Gov. Rick Perry is preparing to unveil a plan designed to simplify the federal tax code and lower the rate that many people pay on income and investments. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin, FILE)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/4/2011 7:25:49 PM EST
    People chat near the parking lot of the Harborside Health Center, Monday, Oct. 3, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. The Oakland medical marijuana dispensary that bills itself as the world's largest is scheduled to announce the results of a year-long Internal Revenue Service audit. Harborside Health Center, which is on pace to do $28 million in annual sales this year, is defending its practice of deducting millions in business expenses such as salaries and overhead. The IRS is evaluating if the deductions were allowed under a tax code provision dealing with ?expenditures in connection with the illegal sale of drugs.? (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/29/2011 1:05:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2005, file photo Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman delivers his first State of the State speech in the Utah's original territorial statehouse in Fillmore. As governor Huntsman put together a conservative economic record with a mostly successful effort to overhaul Utah?s tax code to make it more modern and encourage business investment. "This can truly serve as an economic development tool to encourage entrepreneurs to keep their businesses located in our state and reinvest their capital time and time again," Huntsman said in his 2005 State of the State speech. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:50:20 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson (L) and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS HEADSHOT)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chairs Simpson and Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Simpson and Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:28:59 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson (2nd R) and Erskine Bowles (R) speak to reporters after their meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chairs Simpson and Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Simpson and Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:27:20 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson (C) and Erskine Bowles (R) speak to reporters after their meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson speaks to reporters after his meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson speaks to reporters after his meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:26:04 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson (L) speaks to reporters after his meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. Behind Simpson is fellow co-chair Erskine Bowles (2nd R). REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson speaks to reporters after his meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson speaks to reporters after his meeting with Obama at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:24:43 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chair Alan Simpson (L) speaks to reporters after his meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with Obama in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:23:38 PM EST
    Fiscal Commission co-chairs Alan Simpson (L) and Erskine Bowles speak to reporters after their meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS HEADSHOT)
  •  - Obama speaks as Alan Simpson, co-chair of the Fiscal Commission, listens during their meeting at the White House in Washington

    Obama speaks as Alan Simpson, co-chair of the Fiscal Commission, listens during their meeting at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 12:22:14 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (L) speaks as Alan Simpson (R), co-chair of the Fiscal Commission, listens during their meeting at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 11:58:17 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) and Vice President Joe Biden (2nd R) meet with Erskine Bowles (L) and Alan Simpson (R), co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 11:56:58 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) and Vice President Joe Biden (3rd L) meet with Erskine Bowles (2nd L) and Alan Simpson (R), co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Obama speaks during a meeting with Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson at the White House in Washington

    Obama speaks during a meeting with Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 11:41:47 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a meeting with Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Obama and Biden meet with Bowles and Simpson, co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 4/14/2011 11:38:11 AM EST
    President Barack Obama (Right, C) and Vice President Joe Biden (Left, C) meet with Erskine Bowles (next to Biden) and Alan Simpson (next to Obama), co-chairs of the Fiscal Commission, at the White House in Washington April 14, 2011. Obama said on Thursday the United States must use the tax code to help meet its targets for reducing the deficit. Also attending are Chief of Staff William Daley (L), Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner (2nd R) and OMB Director Jack Lew (R). REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)