Success Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A citizen is questioned during registration for the government identity card at the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A citizen has his fingerprints recorded to register for the government identity card at the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A worker of the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) checks newly printed government identity cards of registered citizens at the NADRA head office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14 , 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A citizen is photographed during registration for the government identity card at the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    Pakistanis wait in line to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned to register for the government identity card outside the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A citizen is questioned during registration for the government identity card at the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A citizen has his fingerprints recorded to register for the government identity card at the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
  •  - To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    To match Feature PAKISTAN-IDENTITY/

    Posted: 11/22/2012 5:12:53 PM EST
    A worker of the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) checks newly printed government identity cards of registered citizens at the NADRA head office in Islamabad November 14, 2012. Elderly men wait patiently, carefully combing their hennaed beards, while a guitar-playing student entertains the long queue of Pakistanis lined-up to be photographed, fingerprinted and questioned inside a crowded office in the capital Islamabad. This is the unlikely setting for possibly one of Pakistan's few success stories - a massive increase in citizens signing up for government identity card. Picture taken on November 14 , 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, w

    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, w

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, a

    In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, a

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, weal

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, weal

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing

    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had specia

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had specia

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party

    In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party 18th National Delegates Congress successful opening" in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significa

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significa

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a plainclothes security person walks outside the high walls of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound in Beijing. The color red has long had special significan

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a plainclothes security person walks outside the high walls of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound in Beijing. The color red has long had special significan

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a plainclothes security person walks outside the high walls of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, residents walk along a popular retail street in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, residents walk along a popular retail street in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, residents walk along a popular retail street in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese bride wearing a red gown poses for photos in front of the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese bride wearing a red gown poses for photos in front of the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese bride wearing a red gown poses for photos in front of the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 16, 2012 photo, residents walk past the iconic CCTV building in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    In this Nov. 16, 2012 photo, residents walk past the iconic CCTV building in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 16, 2012 photo, residents walk past the iconic CCTV building in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, tourists visit the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, tourists visit the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wish

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, tourists visit the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)