Speed of Light Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/19/2012 3:35:49 PM EST
    This image made distributed by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Monday, March 19, 2012 shows part of a newly revealed archived document, one of only three existing manuscripts which contain Einstein's famous formula describes the relationship between energy (E), mass (m) and the speed of light (c), which derives from Einstein's special theory of relativity. Einstein's complete archives are being uploaded to the internet for the first time. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which owns the famed scientist's original papers, is slowly uploading high resolution photographs of his handwritten manuscripts, including ones in his own handwriting which outline his groundbreaking theory of relativity. (AP Photo/Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
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    Posted: 1/4/2012 4:05:47 PM EST
    In this 2011 illustration, provided by Cornell University, scientists demonstrate how they have have created, a new invisibility technique that doesn?t just cloak an object _ like in Harry Potter books and movies _ but masks an entire event. It is a time masker that works by briefly bending the speed of light around an event. Cornell scientists explain what they are talking about in this 2011 illustration that shows that if this technique is ever scaled up an art thief can walk into a museum and steal a painting without setting of laser beam alarms or even showing up on surveillance cameras or your eyes. (AP Photo/Heather Deal, Cornell University)
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    Posted: 9/28/2011 5:00:50 PM EST
    In this Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011 photo, physicist Dmitri Denisov, who works on one of two huge particle detectors at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., that gather data from the lab's Tevatron collider, looks over the area that houses the lab's four mile underground track. Inside the track, beams of protons and anti-protons race around at nearly the speed of light before smashing them to dislodge hidden particles that make up matter. On Friday, Sept. 30, physicists will shut down the Tevatron, a once-unrivaled atom smasher that has been eclipsed by the Large Hadron Collider buried beneath the border of France and Switzerland. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 9/24/2011 3:50:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 28, 1934 file photo, Albert Einstein delivers a lecture at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in the auditorium of the Carnegie Institue of Technology Little Theater at Pittsburgh. Scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, the world's largest physics lab, say they have clocked subatomic particles, called neutrinos, traveling faster than light, a feat that, if true, would break a fundamental pillar of science, the idea that nothing is supposed to move faster than light, at least according to Einstein's special theory of relativity: The famous E (equals) mc2 equation. That stands for energy equals mass times the speed of light squared. The readings have so astounded researchers that they are asking others to independently verify the measurements before claiming an actual discovery. (AP Photo)
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    Posted: 9/24/2011 3:50:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, March 30, 2010 file photo, the globe of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, is illuminated outside Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists at CERN, the world's largest physics lab, say they have clocked subatomic particles, called neutrinos, traveling faster than light, a feat that, if true, would break a fundamental pillar of science, the idea that nothing is supposed to move faster than light, at least according to Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity: The famous E (equals) mc2 equation. That stands for energy equals mass times the speed of light squared. The readings have so astounded researchers that they are asking others to independently verify the measurements before claiming an actual discovery. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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    Posted: 9/24/2011 3:50:45 AM EST
    This undated file photo shows famed physicist Albert Einstein. Scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, the world's largest physics lab, say they have clocked subatomic particles, called neutrinos, traveling faster than light, a feat that, if true, would break a fundamental pillar of science, the idea that nothing is supposed to move faster than light, at least according to Einstein's special theory of relativity: The famous E (equals) mc2 equation. That stands for energy equals mass times the speed of light squared. The readings have so astounded researchers that they are asking others to independently verify the measurements before claiming an actual discovery. (AP Photo)
  •  - File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the path of underground ring of  LHC of CERN in Geneva

    File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the path of underground ring of LHC of CERN in Geneva

    Posted: 9/23/2011 8:33:55 AM EST
    File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the 27 km (16.7 miles) path of the underground ring of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) of the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) in Geneva September 29, 2044, to celebrate CERN's 50th anniversary. An international team of scientists said on September 23, 2011, they had recorded sub-atomic particles travelling faster than light -- a finding that could overturn one of Einstein's long-accepted fundamental laws of the universe. Antonio Ereditato, spokesman for the researchers, told Reuters that measurements taken over three years showed neutrinos pumped from CERN near Geneva to Gran Sasso in Italy had arrived 60 nanoseconds quicker than light would have done. If confirmed, the discovery would undermine Albert Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity, which says that the speed of light is a "cosmic constant" and that nothing in the universe can travel faster. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/Files (SWITZERLAND - Tags:
  •  - Undated handout photo shows researcher Dario Autiero at his laboratory in Lyon

    Undated handout photo shows researcher Dario Autiero at his laboratory in Lyon

    Posted: 9/23/2011 8:30:28 AM EST
    Researcher Dario Autiero is pictured at his laboratory in Villeurbanne, near Lyon, France in this undated September 2011 handout photograph. An international team of scientists led by Dario Autiero said on Thursday, September 22, 2011, they had recorded sub-atomic particles travelling faster than light-- a finding that could overturn one of Einstein's long-accepted fundamental laws of the universe. If confirmed, the discovery would undermine Albert Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity, which says that the speed of light is a "cosmic constant" and that nothing in the universe can travel faster. REUTERS/Cyril Fresillon/CNRS Phototheque/IPNL (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY PROFILE) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout photo of researcher Dario Autiero standing next to OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at  LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome

    Handout photo of researcher Dario Autiero standing next to OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome

    Posted: 9/23/2011 8:22:46 AM EST
    Researcher Dario Autiero (R) stands next to OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome is seen in this undated handout photograph. An international team of scientists led by Autiero said on September 22, 2011 they had recorded sub-atomic particles travelling faster than light -- a finding that could overturn one of Einstein's long-accepted fundamental laws of the universe. If confirmed, the discovery would undermine Albert Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity, which says that the speed of light is a "cosmic constant" and that nothing in the universe can travel faster. REUTERS/Bernard Ille/CNRS Phototheque/IPNL/Handout (ITALY - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Undated handout photo of the OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome

    Undated handout photo of the OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome

    Posted: 9/23/2011 8:11:17 AM EST
    The OPERA experiment's 1,800-ton detector at LNGS (Gran Sasso National Laboratory) at L'Aquila, near Rome is seen in this undated handout photograph. An international team of scientists said on September 22, 2011 they had recorded sub-atomic particles travelling faster than light -- a finding that could overturn one of Einstein's long-accepted fundamental laws of the universe. If confirmed, the discovery would undermine Albert Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity, which says that the speed of light is a "cosmic constant" and that nothing in the universe can travel faster. REUTERS/Bernard Ille/CNRS Phototheque/IPNL/Handout (ITALY - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the path of underground ring of  LHC of CERN in Geneva

    File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the path of underground ring of LHC of CERN in Geneva

    Posted: 9/23/2011 7:39:49 AM EST
    File photo of spotlights aimed at the sky above ground along the 27 km (16.7 miles) path of the underground ring of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) of the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) in Geneva September 29, 2044, to celebrate CERN's 50th anniversary. An international team of scientists said on September 23, 2011, they had recorded sub-atomic particles travelling faster than light -- a finding that could overturn one of Einstein's long-accepted fundamental laws of the universe. Antonio Ereditato, spokesman for the researchers, told Reuters that measurements taken over three years showed neutrinos pumped from CERN near Geneva to Gran Sasso in Italy had arrived 60 nanoseconds quicker than light would have done. If confirmed, the discovery would undermine Albert Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity, which says that the speed of light is a "cosmic constant" and that nothing in the universe can travel faster. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/Files (SWITZERLAND - Tags:
  •  - Scientists serve champagne to celebrate the first successful collisions at full power at the CMS experience control room of the LHC at the CERN in Meyrin

    Scientists serve champagne to celebrate the first successful collisions at full power at the CMS experience control room of the LHC at the CERN in Meyrin

    Posted: 3/30/2010 8:23:21 AM EST
    Scientists serve champagne to celebrate the first successful collisions at full power at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience control room of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin, near Geneva March 30, 2010. Scientists at the CERN research centre will begin trying on Tuesday to make particles collide at ultra-high power and close to the speed of light to create mini-versions of the "Big Bang" that gave birth to the universe. Picture taken with a fisheye lens. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: SCI TECH SOCIETY)
  •  - A scientist looks at the first collisions pictures at full power at the CMS experience control room at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin

    A scientist looks at the first collisions pictures at full power at the CMS experience control room at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin

    Posted: 3/30/2010 7:31:24 AM EST
    A scientist looks at the first collisions pictures at full power at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience control room at the Large European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin, near Geneva March 30, 2010. Scientists at the CERN research centre will begin trying on Tuesday to make particles collide at ultra-high power and close to the speed of light to create mini-versions of the "Big Bang" that gave birth to the universe. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: SCI TECH SOCIETY)


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