Social Security Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:47:56 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa attends an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:46:55 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. The poster reads, "The citizens' livelihood is the top priority". Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:45:31 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS PROFILE)
  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:44:25 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:43:42 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa reacts during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS PROFILE HEADSHOT)
  •  - To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA

    Posted: 3/15/2012 3:42:39 AM EST
    Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan powerbroker Ichiro Ozawa speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo March 14, 2012. Japanese ruling party heavyweight Ozawa threatened to vote against sales tax hike bills to fund bulging social security costs, the latest sign of trouble for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's battle to fix the nation's tattered finances. Ozawa, 69, a former Democratic Party of Japan leader, told Reuters in an interview that he still hoped Noda would reconsider his plan to enact bills to double the 5 percent sales tax in two stages by October 2015. Picture taken March 14, 2012. To match Exclusive Interview JAPAN-POLITICS/OZAWA REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS PROFILE)
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    Posted: 2/29/2012 11:30:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2011, file photo, Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, comments in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, after leaving the floor of the Senate, where legislation was passed to extend Social Security payroll tax cut and jobless benefits. Snowe, who has served 33 years in Congress, released a statement Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012 saying that she will not run for re-election. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 6:40:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2011 file photo, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans are looking to deny illegal immigrants the child tax credit, and refund checks as one way to help pay for extending the Social Security tax cut another 10 months. (AP Photo Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 6:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2012 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. speaks on Capitol hill in Washington. Republicans are looking to deny illegal immigrants the child tax credit, and refund checks as one way to help pay for extending the Social Security tax cut another 10 months. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 6:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 8, 2011 file photo, House Social Security subcommittee Chairman Rep. Sam Johnson, R-Texas presided over the subcommittee's hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans are looking to deny illegal immigrants the child tax credit, and refund checks as one way to help pay for extending the Social Security tax cut another 10 months. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas speaks in Elko, Nev.Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2008 file photo, President George W. Bush speaks at the White House in Washington. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich campaigns in Las Vegas. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in Washington. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 6:10:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to supporters in Tampa, Fla. Politicians of all stripes in this election year are clamoring for simplifying the tax code and closing loopholes. But that would mean Americans could lose some of their prized deductions. Tax reform does sound like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax? Not likely. In fact, none of the major tax overhaul proposals now on the table seems likely to be enacted given the current political situation in Washington and the country. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
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    Posted: 1/30/2012 10:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2012 file photo, worshippers pack the compound of Sensoji temple to pray in the hope of receiving a New Year's blessing in the Asakusa district in Tokyo. Japan's rapid aging means the national population of 128 million will shrink by one-third by 2060 and seniors will account for 40 percent of people, placing a greater burden on the shrinking work force population to support the social security and tax systems. The population estimate released Monday, Jan. 30 by the Health and Welfare Ministry paints a grim future. The sign reads, "Please advance in good order." (AP Photo/Hiro Komae, File)
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    Posted: 1/30/2012 10:00:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2011 file photo, a kimono-clad elderly woman walks across a street in Tokyo. Japan's rapid aging means the national population of 128 million will shrink by one-third by 2060 and seniors will account for 40 percent of people, placing a greater burden on the shrinking work force population to support the social security and tax systems. The population estimate released Monday, Jan. 30 by the Health and Welfare Ministry paints a grim future. (AP Photo/Junji Kurokawa, File)
  •  - Japan's PM Noda bows as he arrives at an ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Noda bows as he arrives at an ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Posted: 1/24/2012 3:44:36 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows as he arrives at an ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo January 24, 2012. Noda renewed his appeal to opposition parties on Tuesday to join talks on tax and social security reforms aimed at keeping in check swelling national borrowing, pointing at the European debt crisis to underscore the urgency of doing so. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Noda makes a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Noda makes a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Posted: 1/24/2012 3:43:15 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda makes a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo January 24, 2012. Noda renewed his appeal to opposition parties on Tuesday to join talks on tax and social security reforms aimed at keeping in check swelling national borrowing, pointing at the European debt crisis to underscore the urgency of doing so. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Noda makes a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Noda makes a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo

    Posted: 1/24/2012 3:41:50 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda walks to the podium to make a policy speech during the start of ordinary session at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo January 24, 2012. Noda renewed his appeal to opposition parties on Tuesday to join talks on tax and social security reforms aimed at keeping in check swelling national borrowing, pointing at the European debt crisis to underscore the urgency of doing so. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)