Social Security Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/19/2012 5:15:47 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 13, 2012 photo, Diane Martell, 17, right, leans on her parents Maurcio and Guadalupe on the porch of their home in Bessemer, Ala. The Martells are illegal immigrants, as are most of the residents of this trailer park, and they live in fear of Alabama's harsh immigration laws. From left are her sisters Monserrat, 11, and Alexa, 12. Diane says she is tired of watching the fear in her father's face every time he drives, tired of her mother begging her not to walk to school on the days the ICE van is parked down the street, tired of being told that she cannot get a driver's license, or a job or maybe even a college education because she doesn't have a Social Security number. "We are human beings," Martell says. "We are not criminals, and we are not aliens and we cannot just stay silent." (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 4:15:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this March 13, 2012, file photo Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., joins students at a Capitol Hill news conference to announce the collection of over 130,000 letters to Congress to prevent student loan interest rates from doubling this July. With Congress returning from a weeklong spring recess, the Senate plans to vote Tuesday, May 8, on whether to start debating a Democratic plan to keep college loan interest rates for 7.4 million students from doubling. The $6 billion bill would be paid for by collecting more Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes from high-earning owners of some privately held corporations. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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    Posted: 4/24/2012 12:30:50 PM EST
    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, center, and Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, left, listen as Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius speaks at a news conference on the Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports, Monday, April 23, 2012, at the Treasury Department in Washington. Trustees update forecasts for the government's two largest benefit programs, which are laboring under the weight of retiring baby boomers, revenue shortages and politicians' reluctance to take painful action to fix them. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 4/24/2012 12:30:49 PM EST
    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks at a news conference on the Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports, Monday, April 23, 2012, at the Treasury Department in Washington. Trustees update forecasts for the government's two largest benefit programs, which are laboring under the weight of retiring baby boomers, revenue shortages and politicians' reluctance to take painful action to fix them. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 4/24/2012 12:30:49 PM EST
    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, right, and Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, left, listen as Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, center, speaks at a news conference on the Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports, Monday, April 23, 2012, at the Treasury Department in Washington. Trustees update forecasts for the government's two largest benefit programs, which are laboring under the weight of retiring baby boomers, revenue shortages and politicians' reluctance to take painful action to fix them. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 4/24/2012 12:30:49 PM EST
    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner listens during a news conference on the Social Security and Medicare Trustees Reports, Monday, April 23, 2012, at the Treasury Department in Washington. Trustees update forecasts for the government's two largest benefit programs, which are laboring under the weight of retiring baby boomers, revenue shortages and politicians' reluctance to take painful action to fix them. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 4/23/2012 5:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 30, 2011 file photo, Labor Secretary Hilda Solis speaks at the National Press Club in Washington. An aging population and an economy that has been slow to rebound are straining the long-term finances of Social Security and Medicare, the government's two largest benefit programs. Those problems are getting new attention Monday as the trustees who oversee the massive programs release their annual financial reports. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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    Posted: 4/23/2012 5:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 3, 2012 file photo, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks at the Treasury Department in Washington. An aging population and an economy that has been slow to rebound are straining the long-term finances of Social Security and Medicare, the government's two largest benefit programs. Those problems are getting new attention Monday as the trustees who oversee the massive programs release their annual financial reports. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
  •  - Members of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    Members of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    Posted: 4/18/2012 2:23:21 PM EST
    Members of the National Union of the Elderly (NUE) protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua April 18, 2012. Thousands of elders protested to demand a minimum pension of $90 dollars to survive and reject the proposed social security reforms. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Members of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    Members of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    Posted: 4/18/2012 2:19:51 PM EST
    Members of the National Union of the Elderly (NUE) protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua April 18, 2012. Thousands of elders protested to demand a minimum pension of $90 dollars to survive and reject the proposed social security reforms. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS)
  •  - A member of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    A member of the NUE protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua

    Posted: 4/18/2012 2:18:00 PM EST
    A member of the National Union of the Elderly (NUE) protest in front of the National Assembly building in Managua April 18, 2012. Thousands of elders protested to demand a minimum pension of $90 dollars to survive and reject the proposed social security reforms. The banner reads, "elderly". REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 4/2/2012 10:15:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 12, 2009, file photo Jonathan Gruber, professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, participates in a Capitol Hill hearing on the overhaul of the heath care system in Washington. A supporter of the Affordable Care Act, Gruber says, "It?s so crazy to think that a society that has Social Security and Medicare would not find this (law) constitutional.? Gruber advised both the Obama administration and Massachusetts lawmakers as they developed the state mandate in the 2006 law that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney championed as governor. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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    Posted: 4/2/2012 10:15:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010, file photo U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg poses for a group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. During the Supreme Court arguments last week over the constitutionality of the health care law Ginsburg brought up Social Security, likening it to a government old-age annuity that everyone is forced to purchase. ?It just seems very strange to me that there?s no question we can have a Social Security system (despite) all the people who say: ?I?m being forced to pay for something I don?t want,?? she said. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:15:28 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:12:36 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:08:16 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda attends a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows to the Japanese national flag at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows to the Japanese national flag at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:05:51 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows to the Japanese national flag at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:04:31 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda bows at the end of a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda is seen at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda is seen at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:02:55 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda is seen at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda is framed by the silhouettes of reporters at a news conference in Tokyo

    Japan's PM Yoshihiko Noda is framed by the silhouettes of reporters at a news conference in Tokyo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 6:01:26 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda is framed by the silhouettes of reporters at a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo March 30, 2012. Japan's government on Friday submitted laws to double its sales tax by 2015 to fund swelling social security costs in the world's fastest-ageing nation, setting up a showdown that could split the ruling party, force early elections and deepen policy paralysis. Noda has staked his political career on the tax hike plan, but the chance of success looks slim as opposition parties in a divided parliament baulk at cooperating with the government. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)