Social Security Photos on Townhall

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              In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.

    In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:23:21 PM EST
    In this photo taken July 26, 2012, Marge Youngs is shown in her home in Toledo, Ohio. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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              FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Ph

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Ph

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower, File)
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              FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As mill

    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As mill

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's

    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, rolls of blank social security checks run through printers and are processed at the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower, File)
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              ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at t

    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at t

    Posted: 8/12/2012 12:18:25 PM EST
    ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, Social Security Administration Commissioner Michael J. Astrue participates in a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. As millions of baby boomers flood Social Security with applications for benefits, the program's $2.7 trillion surplus is starting to look small. For nearly three decades Social Security produced big surpluses, collecting more in taxes from workers than it paid in benefits to retirees. The surpluses also helped mask the size of the budget deficit being generated by the rest of the federal government. Those days are over. Since 2010, Social Security has been paying out more in benefits than it collects in taxes, adding to the urgency for Congress to address the program's long-term finances. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              Graphic shows projected Social Security debts and ratio of certain recipients

    Graphic shows projected Social Security debts and ratio of certain recipients

    Posted: 8/5/2012 12:58:23 PM EST
    Graphic shows projected Social Security debts and ratio of certain recipients
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              FILE - This February 2005 file photo shows trays of printed social security checks, in Philadelphia, waiting to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury. People retiring today are part of the f

    FILE - This February 2005 file photo shows trays of printed social security checks, in Philadelphia, waiting to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury. People retiring today are part of the f

    Posted: 8/5/2012 9:43:25 AM EST
    FILE - This February 2005 file photo shows trays of printed social security checks, in Philadelphia, waiting to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury. People retiring today are part of the first generation of workers who have paid more in Social Security taxes during their careers than they will receive in benefits after they retire. It’s a historic shift that will only get worse for future retirees, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. Previous generations got a much better bargain, mainly because payroll taxes were very low when Social Security was enacted in the 1930s and remained so for decades. (AP Photo/Bradley C. Bower, File)
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              In this July 26, 2012, photo, Neta Homier looks over bills in her home in Toledo, Ohio. Homier says she relies on Social Security to pay her bills and while she is confident the program

    In this July 26, 2012, photo, Neta Homier looks over bills in her home in Toledo, Ohio. Homier says she relies on Social Security to pay her bills and while she is confident the program

    Posted: 8/5/2012 9:43:25 AM EST
    In this July 26, 2012, photo, Neta Homier looks over bills in her home in Toledo, Ohio. Homier says she relies on Social Security to pay her bills and while she is confident the program will continue to help her she fears it will not be able to rely on it. "Social Security is what’s carrying me," Homier said. "It pays all my bills." People retiring today are part of the first generation of workers who have paid more in Social Security taxes during their careers than they will receive in benefits after they retire. It’s a historic shift that will only get worse for future retirees, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. Previous generations got a much better bargain, mainly because payroll taxes were very low when Social Security was enacted in the 1930s and remained so for decades. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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              Iranian teachers Akram Shafizadeh, left, and Saba Mirvahabi, hold young children in a kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching fam

    Iranian teachers Akram Shafizadeh, left, and Saba Mirvahabi, hold young children in a kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching fam

    Posted: 7/29/2012 12:18:38 PM EST
    Iranian teachers Akram Shafizadeh, left, and Saba Mirvahabi, hold young children in a kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, authorities are now slashing its birth-control programs in an attempt to avoid an aging demographic similar to many Western countries that are struggling to keep up with state medical and social security costs. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
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              In this Thursday, July 26, 2012 photo, Iranian girls attend a class on how to read the Quran in Tehran, Iran. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, Iran is

    In this Thursday, July 26, 2012 photo, Iranian girls attend a class on how to read the Quran in Tehran, Iran. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, Iran is

    Posted: 7/29/2012 12:18:38 PM EST
    In this Thursday, July 26, 2012 photo, Iranian girls attend a class on how to read the Quran in Tehran, Iran. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, Iran is now slashing its birth-control programs in an attempt to avoid an aging demographic similar to many Western countries that are struggling to keep up with state medical and social security costs. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
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              After swimming, Iranian children nap in their kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, authorities are n

    After swimming, Iranian children nap in their kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, authorities are n

    Posted: 7/29/2012 12:18:38 PM EST
    After swimming, Iranian children nap in their kindergarten in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, July 28, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, authorities are now slashing its birth-control programs in an attempt to avoid an aging demographic similar to many Western countries that are struggling to keep up with state medical and social security costs. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
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              Iranian nurse Zahra Akbarzadeh, left, gives one-day-old baby girl Setayesh to her mother, Tayyebeh Sadat Bidak, to feed her at the Mehr hospital, in Tehran, Sunday, July 29, 2012. In a

    Iranian nurse Zahra Akbarzadeh, left, gives one-day-old baby girl Setayesh to her mother, Tayyebeh Sadat Bidak, to feed her at the Mehr hospital, in Tehran, Sunday, July 29, 2012. In a

    Posted: 7/29/2012 12:18:38 PM EST
    Iranian nurse Zahra Akbarzadeh, left, gives one-day-old baby girl Setayesh to her mother, Tayyebeh Sadat Bidak, to feed her at the Mehr hospital, in Tehran, Sunday, July 29, 2012. In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, Iran is now slashing its birth-control programs in an attempt to avoid an aging demographic similar to many Western countries that are struggling to keep up with state medical and social security costs. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
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              FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Read

    FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Read

    Posted: 6/27/2012 2:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Ready or not, big changes lie ahead for virtually every U.S. taxpayer next year. Tax cuts put into place under the Bush administration that slashed rates on wages, dividends and capital gains are set to expire at the end of 2012. The Social Security payroll tax cut enacted this year also will end, as will the exemption of millions of middle-class families from the alternative minimum tax. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
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              In this still image taken from an undated video released by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, an image created through medical imaging technology s

    In this still image taken from an undated video released by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, an image created through medical imaging technology s

    Posted: 6/27/2012 12:13:35 PM EST
    In this still image taken from an undated video released by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, an image created through medical imaging technology shows an X-ray-like image of 2-year-old Jesus Rodriguez, prior to having a benign tumor removed from his body. Mexican doctors successfully removed a 33 pound (15 kg) benign tumor protruding from the boy's right side, connected to the body from the armpit to the hip, and weighed more than Jesus. (AP Photo/IMSS)
  •  - A maid blowing a whistle is seen through a maid's banner during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    A maid blowing a whistle is seen through a maid's banner during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Posted: 6/15/2012 4:43:06 PM EST
    A maid blowing a whistle is seen through a maid's banner during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima June 15, 2012. The domestic workers were asking for no less than the minimum wage, 8-hour day shifts, social security and holidays. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - A banner with the image of a maid is seen during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    A banner with the image of a maid is seen during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Posted: 6/15/2012 4:36:20 PM EST
    A banner with the image of a maid is seen during a demonstration by maids to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima June 15, 2012. The domestic workers were asking for no less than the minimum wage, 8-hour day shifts, social security and holidays. The banner reads, "No more in the shadow. Ratification now." REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Maids participate in a demonstration to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Maids participate in a demonstration to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Posted: 6/15/2012 4:30:59 PM EST
    Maids participate in a demonstration to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima June 15, 2012. The domestic workers were asking for no less than the minimum wage, 8-hour day shifts, social security and holidays. The placards (L-R) read, "We all have the same dignity and rights." and "We demand the ratification of the 189 ILO convention." REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Maids shout slogans during a demonstration to demand the respect of their human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Maids shout slogans during a demonstration to demand the respect of their human and labour rights in downtown Lima

    Posted: 6/15/2012 4:15:29 PM EST
    Maids shout slogans during a demonstration to demand respect for human and labour rights in downtown Lima June 15, 2012. The domestic workers were asking for no less than the minimum wage, 8-hour day shifts, social security and holidays. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU - Tags: CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 9:25:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 13, 1943 black-and-white file photo, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaks in Washington. When President Barack Obama's re-election campaign unveiled a new slogan, some conservative critics were quick to pounce. "Forward", they asserted, is a word long associated with Europe's radical left, reaffirming their contention that Obama is, to some degree a socialist. Using "socialist" as a political epithet in the U.S. dates back to pre-Civil War days when abolitionist newspaper editor Horace Greeley was branded a socialist by some pro-slavery adversaries. Decades later, many elements of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal _ including Social Security _ were denounced as socialist. (AP Photo/Robert Clover, File)
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    Posted: 5/19/2012 5:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2011 file photo, 17-year-old Diane Martell of Bessemer, Ala., center, leads protesters in a march outside the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery, Ala. during a demonstration against the state's immigration laws. Diane says she is tired of watching the fear in her father's face every time he drives, tired of her mother begging her not to walk to school on the days the ICE van is parked down the street, tired of being told that she cannot get a driver's license, or a job or maybe even a college education because she doesn't have a Social Security number. "We are human beings," Martell says. "We are not criminals, and we are not aliens and we cannot just stay silent." (AP Photo/Dave Martin)