Social Networks Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/2/2011 9:06:07 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2011 file photo, Sony Computer Entertainment President and CEO Kazuo Hirai speaks how to use its new PlayStation Portable "NGP" at PlayStation Meeting 2011 in Tokyo. People are turning over personal information to online retailers, social networks and others in growing numbers, even as concerns about privacy mount. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, file)
  •  - Family and friends of Adriana Morlett share a moment of silence at a candlelight vigil during Adriana's 22nd birthday in Mexico City

    Family and friends of Adriana Morlett share a moment of silence at a candlelight vigil during Adriana's 22nd birthday in Mexico City

    Posted: 3/15/2011 2:41:46 AM EST
    Adriana Espinosa de Morlett (2nd R) and Javier Morlett (C), parents of Adriana Morlett, share a moment of silence with their son Javier (R) and friends at a candlelight vigil during Adriana's 22nd birthday outside the UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) in Mexico City March 14, 2011. Adriana Morlett, a student at the university, disappeared six months ago after leaving the campus. Nobody has asked for ransom and her parents have launched a search through social networks and in the media. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
  •  - File photo of man arrested by police gesturing in front of the Peace Cinema in Shanghai

    File photo of man arrested by police gesturing in front of the Peace Cinema in Shanghai

    Posted: 3/5/2011 3:43:44 AM EST
    A man arrested by police gestures in front of the Peace Cinema, where Internet social networks were calling to join a "Jasmine Revolution" protest, in Shanghai in this February 20, 2011 file photo. China's spending on police and domestic surveillance will hit new heights this year, with "public security" outlays unveiled on March 5, 2011 outstripping the defence budget for the first time as Beijing cracks down on protest calls. REUTERS/Aly Song/Files (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Plainclothes policeman pushes a protester away after internet social networks called to join a "Jasmine Revolution" protest in front of a Mcdonalds store in central Beijing

    Plainclothes policeman pushes a protester away after internet social networks called to join a "Jasmine Revolution" protest in front of a Mcdonalds store in central Beijing

    Posted: 2/20/2011 4:01:31 AM EST
    A plainclothes policeman (R) pushes a protester away after internet social networks called to join a "Jasmine Revolution" protest in front of a Mcdonalds store in central Beijing February 20, 2011. Chinese President Hu Jintao called on Saturday for stricter government management of the Internet while calls for gatherings inspired by uprisings in the Middle East spread on Chinese websites abroad. The messages have scant chance of inspiring protests in China whose one-party government has plenty of censorship controls in place and where most Chinese have difficulty gaining access to overseas websites because of a censorship "fire wall." REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Protesters take part in a "Jasmine Revolution" protest outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong

    Protesters take part in a "Jasmine Revolution" protest outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong

    Posted: 2/20/2011 3:35:22 AM EST
    Protesters hold up pictures of jasmine flowers during a "Jasmine Revolution" protest outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong February 20, 2011. Government radio reported that mainland authorities have detained a number of activists as they react to messages spread through internet social networks calling for gatherings across China on Sunday to demand sweeping democratic reforms inspired by the "Jasmine Revolution" in the Middle East. The board reads " Build a democratic government ". REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Opponents of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez attend a protest against him in Mexico City

    Opponents of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez attend a protest against him in Mexico City

    Posted: 9/4/2009 6:08:19 PM EST
    Opponents of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, holding a banner which reads "No more Chavez", attend a protest against him in Mexico City, September 4, 2009. Thousands of people marched chanting "No More Chavez" and waving Colombian flags snaked through many cities after organizers called for demonstrations through the Internet social networks Facebook and Twitter. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte (MEXICO POLITICS CONFLICT)
  •  - Protesters shout slogans against Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez during a rally in Miami

    Protesters shout slogans against Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez during a rally in Miami

    Posted: 9/4/2009 5:56:07 PM EST
    Protesters shout slogans against Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez during a rally in Miami, Florida September 4, 2009. Thousands of people marched chanting "No More Chavez" and waving Colombian flags, the marches snaked through Bogota, accompanied by smaller protests in other cities including Caracas and some in the United States and Europe after organizers called for demonstrations through the Internet social networks Facebook and Twitter. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (UNITED STATES POLITICS CONFLICT)
  •  - Snubster.com is seen in this screen shot obtained with permission from the website

    Snubster.com is seen in this screen shot obtained with permission from the website

    Posted: 12/20/2007 4:04:24 PM EST
    Snubster.com is seen in this screen shot obtained with permission from the website. Riding on the popularity of social networks such as Facebook and MySpace, new Web sites are poking fun at online friendships that connect you to the people you like, by turning attention to the ones you don't. Over the past 18 months, sites such Snubster, Enemybook and Hatebook are appealing to Internet users who get a kick out of the tongue-in-cheek humor of mocking their friends and others who are just plain cynical. REUTERS/www.snubster.com/Handout. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.