Slavery Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 11/27/2011 1:10:53 PM EST
    This 1937 photo provided by the Museum of African American History shows the African Meeting House when it was being used as a Jewish synagogue. It was purchased by the museum in 1972. The meeting house, the nation's oldest black church building where prominent abolitionists railed against slavery in the 19th century, is set to reopen to visitors in Boston early next month after a $9 million restoration. (AP Photo/Museum of African American History)
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    Posted: 11/27/2011 1:10:52 PM EST
    In this Nov. 21, 2011 photo, a gaslight shines outside a doorway to the African Meeting House in Boston. The meeting house, the nation's oldest black church building where prominent abolitionists railed against slavery in the 19th century, is set to reopen to visitors in Boston early next month after a $9 million restoration. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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    Posted: 11/27/2011 1:10:52 PM EST
    In this Nov. 21, 2011 photo, executive director Beverly Morgan-Welch, walks past a quote from social reformer, statesman, orator and writer Frederick Douglass on a newly constructed entrance to the African Meeting House in Boston. The meeting house, the nation's oldest black church building where prominent abolitionists railed against slavery in the 19th century, is set to reopen to visitors in Boston early next month after a $9 million restoration. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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    Posted: 11/27/2011 1:10:51 PM EST
    This Nov. 21, 2011 photo shows a view from the podium inside the African Meeting House in Boston. The meeting house, the nation's oldest black church building where prominent abolitionists railed against slavery in the 19th century, is set to reopen to visitors in Boston early next month after a $9 million restoration. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 14, 2009 photo provided by Rhonda Bolling, a pod of killer whales are seen in Carroll Inlet, Alaska. In an unprecedented lawsuit, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is accusing the SeaWorld marine parks of keeping five of its star-performer killer whales in conditions that violate the Constitution's ban on slavery. The suit, which PETA says it will file Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 in U.S. District Court in San Diego, hinges on the fact that the 13th Amendment, while prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude, does not specify that only humans can be victims. (AP Photo/Rhonda Bolling)
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    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 file photo, killer whale Kasatka leaps out of the water while an unidentified trainer gives signals during SeaWorld' Shamu show in San Diego. In an unprecedented lawsuit, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is accusing the SeaWorld marine parks of keeping five of its star-performer killer whales in conditions that violate the Constitution's ban on slavery. The suit, which PETA says it will file Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 in U.S. District Court in San Diego, hinges on the fact that the 13th Amendment, while prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude, does not specify that only humans can be victims. (AP Photo/Chris Park)
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    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:25:47 PM EST
    In this Monday, March 7, 2011 photo, killer whale Tilikum, right, watches as SeaWorld Orlando trainers take a break during a training session at the theme park's Shamu Stadium in Orlando, Fla. In an unprecedented lawsuit, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is accusing the SeaWorld marine parks of keeping five of its star-performer killer whales in conditions that violate the Constitution's ban on slavery. The suit, which PETA says it will file Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 in U.S. District Court in San Diego, hinges on the fact that the 13th Amendment, while prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude, does not specify that only humans can be victims. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)