Science and Technology on Townhall

John Stossel - Wed Jun 18

Ken Connor - Wed Dec 11

Jonah Goldberg - Fri Dec 6

Nicole Bailey - Tue Nov 19

Although those installing solar panels have good intentions, the latest research shows that they may not be the most informed. In the Northern hemisphere, solar panels are generally pointed south but should be pointed west according to energy experts ... more

Suzanne Fields - Fri Mar 29

The digital age continues to confuse and confound a generation of adults who have learned to participate in it, but lack the ability for what Ethel Merman as Annie Oakley called "doin' what comes naturally." ... more

Jonah Goldberg - Fri Mar 15

While many have long seen America as the global bad boy, everybody likes Canada. If Uncle Sam tucks his pack of Marlboros under his T-shirt sleeve and plays by his own rules, the Canadian moose -- or whatever their Uncle Sam equivalent is -- always wears his blue blazer and school tie and does his chores without being asked. Canada is a global citizen, a good neighbor, a northern Puerto Rico with an EU sensibility that earns its gold stars from the United Nations every day. ... more

Angela Logomasini - Thu Feb 7

“Green chemistry” has become the latest craze and now government agencies are sponsoring programs to teach it to kids in school. But what exactly is green chemistry? Some say it’s simply about making products safer, but it actually comes loaded with a political agenda that isn’t really about safety—it’s about control. ... more

Walter E. Williams - Wed Jan 23

Let's look at experts. Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was a mathematician and scientist. Newton has to be the greatest and most influential scientist who has ever lived. He laid the foundation for classical mechanics, and his genius transformed our understanding of science, particularly in the areas of physics, mathematics and astronomy. What's not widely known is that Newton spent most of his waking hours on alchemy; his experiments included trying to turn lead into gold. Though he wrote volumes on alchemy, after his death Britain's Royal Society deemed that they were "not fit to be printed." ... more

Phyllis Schlafly - Tue Jan 15

The China problem is not just that China is raking in trillions of dollars because of Obama's spending and borrowing binges, and it's not just that government policies encourage well-paying U.S. manufacturing jobs to move overseas. An even bigger problem is that the Obama administration is about to give Communist China some of our most precious and up-to-date military technology. ... more

Steve Chapman - Thu Nov 29

Some 200 retailers nationally opened their doors on Thanksgiving Day, and a lot of others did so at midnight. Shoes, jewelry, sporting goods, flat-screen TVs, fancy chocolate -- if you wanted it, you could buy it before the football games were finished. ... more

John C. Goodman - Sat Oct 6

Personalized medicine is the future. It's where the science is going. It's where the technology is going. It's where doctors and patients will want to go. Yet, unfortunately for many of us, this is not where the Obama administration wants to go. ... more

Jonah Goldberg - Fri May 25

Jack Andraka, a 15-year-old kid from Maryland, just won the world's largest high school science competition by creating a new test for pancreatic cancer, one of the nastiest and most lethal forms of the disease. ... more

Jonah Goldberg - Thu May 3

Over the past decade, a new fad has taken hold among academics and liberal journalists: call it the new science of conservative phrenology. No, it doesn't actually involve using calipers to determine intelligence based on the size and shape of people's heads. The measuring devices are better -- MRIs and gene sequencers -- but the conclusions are worse. ... more

Jacob Sullum - Wed Apr 18

If you are reading this column online at work, you may be committing a federal crime. Or so says the Justice Department, which reads the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) broadly enough to encompass personal use of company computers as well as violations of fine-print website rules that people routinely ignore. ... more

Nicole Kurokawa - Tue Apr 10

Children learn that April showers bring May flowers. For farmers around the world, however, May flowers are affected by other factors as well, such as weather, disease, and insects. In 2008 (the last year that statistics were published), the United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization estimated that 13 percent of the world’s population – a full 850 million people – were undernourished. ... more

Suzanne Fields - Fri Mar 30

The Internet is the latest tool for compassionate activism. When the sights of Angelina Jolie's leg goes viral, she magnifies her female celebrity by focusing attention on the miseries of Darfur. She teases and titillates in a celebrity culture and uses her fame for a good cause. ... more

Rich Galen - Fri Mar 16

Today, at 8 AM local time, the Apple iPad (colloquially, but not officially, known as the iPad 3) goes on sale at the hundreds of Apple stores in the US and overseas, plus Wal-Mart, AT&T, Verizon, Best Buy, Radio Shack and Target stores. ... more

Jonah Goldberg - Fri Mar 9

There's a great scene in the movie "The Right Stuff" where the original Mercury astronauts are checking out the capsule for their first trips to space. They're horrified to discover that the German scientists in charge of the program see the astronauts as nothing more than living props. ... more