Robocalls Photos on Townhall

  •  - Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut

    Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut

    Posted: 4/1/2013 11:10:08 PM EST
    Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut March 28, 2013 after receiving robocalls from the NRA, trying to enlist them in efforts to defeat new statewide gun control proposals. REUTERS/ Michelle McLoughlin
  •  - Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut

    Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut

    Posted: 4/1/2013 11:10:08 PM EST
    Residents protest outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation in Newtown, Connecticut March 28, 2013 after receiving robocalls from the NRA, trying to enlist them in efforts to defeat new statewide gun control proposals. REUTERS/ Michelle McLoughlin
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              In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply

    In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply

    Posted: 9/16/2012 11:28:25 AM EST
    In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply about unwanted phone solicitations, raising questions about how well the federal “do-not-call” registry is working. The biggest category of complaint: those annoying pre-recorded pitches called robocalls that hawk everything from lower credit card interest rates to new windows for your home. "I am completely fed up," Madison said. "I've repeatedly asked them to take me off their call list." When he challenges their right to call, the solicitors become combative, he said. "There's just nothing that they won't do." (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
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              In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply

    In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply

    Posted: 9/16/2012 11:28:25 AM EST
    In this photo taken Aug. 20, 2012, Robert Madison talks about receiving automated marketing calls, outside his office in Overland Park, Kan. Complaints to the government are up sharply about unwanted phone solicitations, raising questions about how well the federal “do-not-call” registry is working. The biggest category of complaint: those annoying pre-recorded pitches called robocalls that hawk everything from lower credit card interest rates to new windows for your home. "I am completely fed up," Madison said. "I've repeatedly asked them to take me off their call list." When he challenges their right to call, the solicitors become combative, he said. "There's just nothing that they won't do." (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
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    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:00:48 PM EST
    In a Wednesday, May 2, 2012 photo, a sign lays on its side, along with some liter and discarded bottles in Hollywood, Fla. Hollywood Mayor Peter Bober is using a software program that makes robocalls to the businesses, sometimes about 20 a day, to discourage posting the signs. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:00:48 PM EST
    In a Wednesday, May 2, 2012 photo, a sign offering help in foreclosure cases stands by a street in Pembroke Pines, Fla. The eyesores have vexed Hollywood, Fla., Mayor Peter Bober uses a program that makes robocalls to the businesses, sometimes about 20 a day to discourage posting the signs. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:00:48 PM EST
    In a Wednesday, May 2, 2012 photo, Hollywood, Fla. mayor Peter Bober poses for photos outside the city hall. Bober has started using robocalls to businesses that use signs smashed into lawns and along the corners of busy intersections. The idea has been so successful they've seen a 90 percent reduction of signs in some areas and cities as far away as Canada are calling about the program.(AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:00:47 PM EST
    In a Wednesday, May 2, 2012 photo, a house for sale sign stands beside a Hollywood, Fla. street as cars drive past. The cheap signs smashed into lawns and along the corners of busy intersections have vexed Hollywood Mayor Peter Bober for the past few years. He now uses a software program that makes robocalls to the businesses, sometimes about 20 a day, to discourage posting the signs. The idea has been so successful they've seen a 90 percent reduction of signs in some areas and cities as far away as Canada are calling about the program.(AP Photo/J Pat Carter)