prohibition Photos on Townhall

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              In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Mooseheart High School's Makur Puou (32) shoots over Hinckley-Big Rock's Mitch Ruh during a high school basketball game in Hinckley, Ill. Puou is one of four

    In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Mooseheart High School's Makur Puou (32) shoots over Hinckley-Big Rock's Mitch Ruh during a high school basketball game in Hinckley, Ill. Puou is one of four

    Posted: 12/8/2012 2:03:27 PM EST
    In this Dec. 5, 2012 photo, Mooseheart High School's Makur Puou (32) shoots over Hinckley-Big Rock's Mitch Ruh during a high school basketball game in Hinckley, Ill. Puou is one of four Sudanese athletes who find themselves at center court of a controversy in suburban Chicago over high schools recruiting athletes. The Illinois High School Association board will consider Monday, Dec. 10 whether the three basketball players and a cross-country runner are ineligible to continue competing for Mooseheart. The century-old school says it accepted the students as part of its tradition of helping troubled and poor students, but the ISHA's executive director determined that it broke a prohibition against recruiting athletes after accepting the young men from an Indiana outfit called A-HOPE, an Indiana-based foundation whose founder has drawn NCAA scrutiny. (AP Photo/Daily Herald, Laura Stoecker) MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, TV OUT
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              In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, Sudanese students from left, Wal Khat, Mangisto Deng, Makur Puou and Akim Nyang pose for a photo in the living room of one of the student residences

    In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, Sudanese students from left, Wal Khat, Mangisto Deng, Makur Puou and Akim Nyang pose for a photo in the living room of one of the student residences

    Posted: 12/8/2012 1:53:24 PM EST
    In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, Sudanese students from left, Wal Khat, Mangisto Deng, Makur Puou and Akim Nyang pose for a photo in the living room of one of the student residences on the campus of Mooseheart Child City and School in Mooseheart, Ill., a residential center for children in suburban Chicago supported by the Loyal Order of Moose and the Women of the Moose. The Illinois High School Association board will consider Monday, Dec. 10 whether the student athletes are ineligible to compete for the Red Ramblers of Mooseheart High School. The century-old school says it accepted the students as part of its tradition of helping troubled and poor students, but the ISHA's executive director determined that it broke a prohibition against recruiting by accepting the young men from A-HOPE, an Indiana-based foundation whose founder has drawn NCAA scrutiny. (AP Photo/Carla K. Johnson)
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              FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration shows a 1930s anti-marijuana movie poster as part of an exhibit at the DEA Museum and Visitors Center whic

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration shows a 1930s anti-marijuana movie poster as part of an exhibit at the DEA Museum and Visitors Center whic

    Posted: 12/6/2012 4:58:25 AM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration shows a 1930s anti-marijuana movie poster as part of an exhibit at the DEA Museum and Visitors Center which opened May 10, 1999 in Arlington, Va. After the repeal of alcohol prohibition in 1933, Harry Anslinger, who headed the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, turned his attention to pot. He told of sensational crimes reportedly committed by marijuana addicts. "No one knows, when he places a marijuana cigarette to his lips, whether he will become a philosopher, a joyous reveler in a musical heaven, a mad insensate, a calm philosopher, or a murderer," he wrote in "Marijuana: Assassin of Youth," in 1937. On the occasion of “Legalization Day,” Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, when Washington’s new law takes effect, AP takes a look back at the cultural and legal status of the “evil weed” in American history. (AP Photo/DEA, File)
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              FILE - In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a U.S. Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. N

    FILE - In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a U.S. Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. N

    Posted: 11/29/2012 3:18:30 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a U.S. Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. The White House is threatening that President Barack Obama would veto the defense bill unless Congress makes changes. The Office of Management and Budget issued a statement Thursday as the Senate debated the $631 billion bill. Specifically, the White House complained about provisions restricting the administration's ability to transfer detainees from the U.S. Naval facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to foreign countries. The White House also complained about the prohibition on funds to build a detention facility in the US. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
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              In this Oct. 2, 2012 photo, former Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo speaks out in favor supporting Amendment 64 to legalize marijuana in Colorado during a news conference at the Capito

    In this Oct. 2, 2012 photo, former Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo speaks out in favor supporting Amendment 64 to legalize marijuana in Colorado during a news conference at the Capito

    Posted: 10/16/2012 9:48:30 AM EST
    In this Oct. 2, 2012 photo, former Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo speaks out in favor supporting Amendment 64 to legalize marijuana in Colorado during a news conference at the Capitol in Denver. Tancredo, a suburban Denver Republican who briefly ran for president in 2008, launched a radio ad this week in which he compares marijuana prohibition to alcohol prohibition as a “failed government program” that, in this case, “steers Colorado money to criminals in Mexico.” (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
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              FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nud

    FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nud

    Posted: 8/27/2012 11:33:24 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nude in Sigur Rós' new music video in Lars Von Trier's “The Nymphomaniac." LaBeouf can next be seen in “Lawless,” opening Wednesday, about a West Virginia moonshine business during the Prohibition era. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
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              FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nud

    FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nud

    Posted: 8/27/2012 11:33:24 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, Shia LaBeouf attends a screening of "Lawless" hosted by The Weinstein Company and The Cinema Society in New York. LaBeouf appears completely nude in Sigur Rós' new music video in Lars Von Trier's “The Nymphomaniac." LaBeouf can next be seen in “Lawless,” opening Wednesday, about a West Virginia moonshine business during the Prohibition era. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
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    Posted: 6/1/2012 5:00:46 PM EST
    In this Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011, file photo, the Groupon logo is etched in glass in the lobby of the online coupon company's Chicago offices. Groupon's stock is tumbling as insiders are selling their shares after a post-IPO prohibition was lifted. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
  •  - File photo of anti-Nazi protestor

    File photo of anti-Nazi protestor

    Posted: 3/15/2012 10:36:49 AM EST
    File photo of an anti-Nazi protestor holding a card reading 'No NPD - NPD prohibition now` during a demonstration in Munich November 19, 2011. German police are hunting down more than 100 suspected far-right criminals across the country, an interior ministry document showed March 15, 2012, highlighting the scale of the problem authorities face in the fight against neo-Nazis. Chancellor Angela Merkel's centre-right government has also come under pressure to ban the far-right National Democratic Party (NPD), which currently has legal status and seats in some regional assemblies, which gives it access to state funding. REUTERS/Guido Krzikowski/Files (GERMANY - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA  in Mexico City

    Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA in Mexico City

    Posted: 3/6/2012 7:30:03 PM EST
    Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA (Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food) in Mexico City March 6, 2012. The posters read: "Mexico, ban GE (genetically modified) maize now!" (back C) and " Mayorga, they are calling you! Prohibition to transgenic maize". (Francisco Mayorga is the agriculture minister). REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST AGRICULTURE)
  •  - Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA in Mexico City

    Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA in Mexico City

    Posted: 3/6/2012 4:57:12 PM EST
    Greenpeace activists hold signs that reads, "Mayorga, they are calling you! Prohibition to transgenic maize" during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize outside SAGARPA (Secretary of Agriculture, Ranching, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food supply) in Mexico City March 6, 2012. Francisco Mayorga is Secretary of SAGARPA. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize on the outskirts SAGARPA, in Mexico City

    Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize on the outskirts SAGARPA, in Mexico City

    Posted: 3/6/2012 4:37:19 PM EST
    Greenpeace activists hold signs during a protest against the cultivation of transgenic maize on the outskirts SAGARPA (Secretary of Agriculture, Ranching, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food supply), in Mexico City March 6, 2012. The poster reads, "Mexico ban GE (genetically engineered) maize now" and "Mayorga, they are calling you! Prohibition to transgenic maize" (Francisco Mayorga is Secretary of SAGARPA). REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the

    Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the

    Posted: 2/14/2012 2:56:54 PM EST
    Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the University Cultural Center in Mexico City February 14, 2012. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)
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    Posted: 12/2/2011 6:55:49 PM EST
    CLARIFY'S SPELLING OF SURNAME - FILE - This Jan. 6, 2005, file photo shows a poster featuring prohibitionist Carrie Nation at The Museum of the American Cocktail in New Orleans. The hatchet-wielding teetotaler began her crusade against drinking by busting up saloons in Kansas, which to this day has some of the strictest liquor laws in the country. But in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, where Nation lived for about a decade, county officials on Friday, Dec. 2, 2011, are expected to certify a vote to allow liquor sales on all Sundays except Easter. Nation, who spelled her name "Carrie" earlier in life, preferred the spelling "Carry" once she became a Prohibition zealot and often said that Prohibition "would carry a nation." (AP Photo/Bill Haber, File)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:47 PM EST
    Beer steins are hoisted during a stein holding contest during the Oktoberfest celebration in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry"? Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:47 PM EST
    People dance to a German band during the Oktoberfest celebration in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry"? Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:46 PM EST
    Ashlee Hicks raises a beer during the Oktoberfest celebration in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry" Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:46 PM EST
    People gather to listen to music under a large shed at the Oktoberfest celebration in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry"? Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:46 PM EST
    A beer is served by a street vendor in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry"? Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
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    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:35:46 PM EST
    People dance to a German band during the Oktoberfest celebration in Cullman, Ala., Monday, Oct. 4, 2011. With German roots and a small-town ethic that's conservative to the core, Cullman celebrated Oktoberfest for decades with oompah music and lederhosen, but no beer. That changed this week as organizers tapped a keg of beer for the first time at Cullman's Oktoberfest, ending an autumn prohibition that gained the town of 14,000 fame as the home of what organizers proudly billed as the world's only "dry"? Oktoberfest. Hundreds of people sipped beer and cheered at a stein-hoisting contest as Oktoberfest sold alcohol for the first time Monday night. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)