Profiling Photos on Townhall

  •  - Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez speaks at press conference about the Maricopa County Sheriff's Department in Phoenix, Arizona D

    Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez speaks at press conference about the Maricopa County Sheriff's Department in Phoenix, Arizona D

    Posted: 12/15/2011 3:26:30 PM EST
    Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez with the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division (R) talks about the department's investigative findings on the Maricopa County Sheriff's office, as Roy Austin, Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division listens during a press conference in Phoenix, Arizona December 15, 2011. The Justice Department on Thursday said Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and his deputies violated U.S. civil rights laws by engaging in racial profiling of Latinos and making unlawful arrests in their bid to crack down on illegal immigrants, REUTERS/Laura Segall (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
  •  - File photo of Sheriff Joe Arpaio listening to herman Cain in Maricopa County in Phoenix

    File photo of Sheriff Joe Arpaio listening to herman Cain in Maricopa County in Phoenix

    Posted: 12/15/2011 3:24:48 PM EST
    Sheriff Joe Arpaio listens to Republican Presidential candidate Herman Cain speak in the sheriff's office in Maricopa County, Phoenix in this October 17, 2011 file photo. Arpaio and his deputies violated U.S. civil rights laws by engaging in racial profiling of Latinos and making unlawful arrests in their bid to crack down on illegal immigrants, the U.S. Justice Department said on December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Eric Thayer/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
  •  -
    Posted: 8/19/2011 5:05:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 16, 2009 file photo, a Facebook user logs into their account in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Schleswig-Holstein's data protection commissioner, Thilo Weichert, on Friday, Aug. 19, 2011 ordered state institutions to shut down the fan pages on the social networking site and remove the "Like" button from their websites, saying it leads to profiling that violates German and European law. The latest spat in Germany's issue Facebook comes a week after a member of Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative party in the state stepped down after admitting to having an affair with a 16-year-old he met over the social networking site. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Sean Kilpatrick, File)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:12:30 AM EST
    Workers sit in a new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission workspace for investigators with their recently-created Office of Market Intelligence, where they will be able to watch market traffic on computer terminals at SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:10:02 AM EST
    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is outfitting a workspace for investigators with their new Office of Market Intelligence, where they will be able to watch market traffic on computer terminals at SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:09:06 AM EST
    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is creating a workspace for investigators with their new Office of Market Intelligence, where they will be able to watch market traffic on computer terminals at SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:06:03 AM EST
    Thomas Sporkin, SEC Chief of the Office of Market Intelligence, speaks at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:04:10 AM EST
    Thomas Sporkin, Chief of the Office of Market Intelligence at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), is seen at the headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:02:24 AM EST
    Thomas Sporkin talks about leading the Office of Market Intelligence at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 11:00:57 AM EST
    A general exterior view of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) building in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  -  To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:58:48 AM EST
    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission logo adorns an office door at the SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:57:53 AM EST
    A general exterior view of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:56:21 AM EST
    A U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission graphic appears on a computer screen at the SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:55:04 AM EST
    Suspicious activity reports (SARs) are received in this nondescript, locked room at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:52:46 AM EST
    The seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission hangs on the wall at SEC headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:51:23 AM EST
    A general view of the public hearing room at U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS

    Posted: 7/27/2011 10:50:01 AM EST
    A woman walks through the lobby of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, June 24, 2011. The database is emerging alongside a new program by the FBI's criminal profiling group in Quantico, Virginia, that is creating a series of behavioral composites to help agents investigate white collar crime. The more systematic approach by the SEC and FBI comes in response to the growth and complexity of financial crimes in recent years. Picture taken June 24, 2011. To match Special Report SEC/INVESTIGATIONS REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/8/2011 6:21:23 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 19, 2010 file photo, an Air Canada airplane takes off next to American Airlines Flight 24, that sits empty on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport after a an alleged phone threat. The son of a Pakistani official who was assassinated by an Islamic extremist sued American Airlines after he and his wife were escorted from a plane in handcuffs in response to a telephone hijacking threat that turned out to be a hoax. Shahbaz Ali Taseer and his wife, Maheen Ghani Taseer, claim they were victims of racial profiling by the airline and San Francisco police when they were taken off the New York bound flight (AP Photo/Tony Avelar, file)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/12/2011 3:31:08 PM EST
    In this 2010 photograph provided by Nick Risinger of Skysurvey.org, Risinger is shown in Colorado, setting up a rack of six synchronized cameras for a night of photographing the night sky. Risinger eventually created an image of the entire night sky in a composite photograph made from more than 37,000 exposures taken in different locations all over the world. Risinger traveled more than 60,000 miles by air and land and spent more than a year to produce the photo. (AP Photo/Courtesy Nick Risinger, Skysurvey.org) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES; NO ARCHIVE; FOR USE ONLY WITH STORY PROFILING THE PHOTOGRAPHER
  •  - To match Special Report PROFILING/WHITECOLLARCRIME

    To match Special Report PROFILING/WHITECOLLARCRIME

    Posted: 4/20/2011 11:40:17 AM EST
    Susan Kossler, FBI supervisory special agent (SSA) of the Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) 2 - Crimes Against Adults, holds a report on white collar criminal behavior in her office in Quantico, Virginia April 1, 2011. For about two years now, agents with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's BAU have been consulting with their colleagues in New York who specialize in securities fraud detective work. The BAU agents are going over the case files put together by the FBI for Madoff and other convicted scammers. The hope is the BAU agents, whose work in profiling serial killers has been popularized in books, movies and on TV, can get into the minds' of fraudsters and see what makes them tick. To match Special Report PROFILING/WHITECOLLARCRIME Photo taken April 1, 2011. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP