Privacy Photos on Townhall

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              Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:56:30 AM EST
    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
  •  - 
              Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
  •  - Canada's Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart waits to testify before the Commons privacy committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa

    Canada's Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart waits to testify before the Commons privacy committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa

    Posted: 6/10/2013 1:48:18 PM EST
    Canada's Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart waits to testify before the Commons privacy committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa October 19, 2010. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
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              FILE - In a May 21, 2013, file photo Don Mattrick, president of interactive entertainment business for Microsoft Corp., speaks after unveiling the next-generation Xbox One entertainment

    FILE - In a May 21, 2013, file photo Don Mattrick, president of interactive entertainment business for Microsoft Corp., speaks after unveiling the next-generation Xbox One entertainment

    Posted: 6/10/2013 10:01:28 AM EST
    FILE - In a May 21, 2013, file photo Don Mattrick, president of interactive entertainment business for Microsoft Corp., speaks after unveiling the next-generation Xbox One entertainment and gaming console system in Redmond, Wash. With the world's attention, the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in June could also serve as the ultimate opportunity for Microsoft to address concerns over the connectivity and privacy of the new system. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)
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              FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2013, file photo Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, listens to testimony during hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. After revelations this week that the National Secur

    FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2013, file photo Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, listens to testimony during hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. After revelations this week that the National Secur

    Posted: 6/9/2013 8:42:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2013, file photo Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, listens to testimony during hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. After revelations this week that the National Security Agency (NSA) is allowed to gather U.S. phone calls and emails to sift through them for information leading to terrorist suspects, lawmakers are questioning the scope of the information gathered. “Does that data all have to be held by the government?” asked King, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who was briefed on the program this week. “I don’t think there is evidence of abuse, but I think the program can be changed to be structured with less levels of intrusion on the privacy of Americans.” (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE- In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013, file photo, New York Police Department security cameras are in place at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, in New York. Since Sept. 11,

    FILE- In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013, file photo, New York Police Department security cameras are in place at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, in New York. Since Sept. 11,

    Posted: 6/8/2013 11:31:29 AM EST
    FILE- In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013, file photo, New York Police Department security cameras are in place at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, in New York. Since Sept. 11, 2001, Americans' expectations of privacy have diminished remarkably. Laws were passed to take up the fight against terrorists by giving authorities access to information that previously was off limits and technologies have made it easier for corporations to track their movements and habits. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:24:43 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    U.S. President Obama speaks about wire tapping during a visit to San Jose, California

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency's secret collection of telephone records from millions of Americans during a visit to San Jose, California June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin

    Posted: 6/7/2013 8:07:18 PM EST
    An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. The debate over whether the U.S. government is violating citizens' privacy rights while trying to protect them from terrorism escalated dramatically on Thursday amid reports that authorities have collected data on millions of phone users and tapped into servers at nine internet companies. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski