Postal Service Photos on Townhall

  •  -
    Posted: 12/10/2011 2:45:49 PM EST
    In this May 17, 2010 photo, Joe Tedrow sorts mail at the U.S. Postal Service's mail processing center in Sioux City, Iowa. The plant closed in October 2011, and most of the 100 workers kept their jobs. While leaders of the U.S. Postal Service portray their plans to close 252 mail processing facilities as a dramatic downsizing to save money, the impact on workers and their communities will not be as catastrophic as it might seem. Most employees at the plants will be protected, for now, thanks to a labor contract that guarantees mail clerks cannot be laid off or transferred more than 50 miles away. (AP Photo/Sioux City Journal, Jim Lee) NO SALES; MAGS OUT; TV OUT
  •  -
    Posted: 12/6/2011 1:35:47 AM EST
    A first class envelope is shown at a U.S. Post Office in San Jose, Calif., Monday, Dec. 5, 2011. Unprecedented cuts by the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service will slow first-class delivery next spring and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/6/2011 1:35:47 AM EST
    Letter carrier Timothy Ainsworth, sporting a button in support of higher pay for letter carriers, moves mail into his truck to begin delivery Monday, Dec. 5, 2011, at a post office in Seattle. The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service said Monday it is seeking to move quickly to close 252 mail processing centers and slow first-class delivery next spring, citing steadily declining mail volume. The cuts are part of $3 billion in reductions aimed at helping the agency avert bankruptcy next year. The plant closures are expected to result in the elimination of roughly 28,000 jobs nationwide. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/6/2011 1:35:47 AM EST
    Charts show U.S. Postal Service operating losses and mail volume since
  •  -
    Posted: 12/6/2011 1:35:47 AM EST
    Mail carrier Zack Wyscarver delivers mail in freezing temperatures in Omaha, Neb., Monday, Dec. 5, 2011. Unprecedented cuts by the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service will slow first-class delivery next spring and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/6/2011 1:25:47 AM EST
    Mail carrier Zack Wyscarver delivers mail in freezing temperatures in Omaha, Neb., Monday, Dec. 5, 2011. Unprecedented cuts by the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service will slow first-class delivery next spring and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 9:10:45 PM EST
    Letter carrier Diosdado Gabnat moves boxes of mail into his truck to begin delivery Monday, Dec. 5, 2011, at a post office in Seattle. The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service said Monday it is seeking to move quickly to close 252 mail processing centers and slow first-class delivery next spring, citing steadily declining mail volume. The cuts are part of $3 billion in reductions aimed at helping the agency avert bankruptcy next year. The plant closures are expected to result in the elimination of roughly 28,000 jobs nationwide. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 5:25:47 PM EST
    Mail carrier Zack Wyscarver delivers mail in freezing temperatures in Omaha, Neb., Monday, Dec. 5, 2011. Unprecedented cuts by the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service will slow first-class delivery next spring and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 4:25:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 2, 2010 file photo, letter carrier Kevin Pownall delivers mail in Philadelphia. Facing bankruptcy, the U.S. Postal Service is pushing ahead with unprecedented cuts to first-class mail next spring that will slow delivery and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 12:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 15, 2011, file photo Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe speaks at a news conference on changes to the Postal Service that could potentially save as much as $3 billion in Washington. The estimated $3 billion in reductions, to be announced in broader detail on Monday, Dec. 5, 2011, are part of a wide-ranging effort by the Postal Service to quickly trim costs and avert bankruptcy. While providing short-term relief, the changes could ultimately prove counterproductive, pushing more of America's business onto the Internet.( AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 3:35:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2011, file photo Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe speaks before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee as the panel examines the economic troubles of the Postal Service, a self-funded federal agency, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Seeing no immediate help from Congress, the cash-strapped Postal Service is pushing ahead with unprecedented cuts to first-class mail next spring that will slow delivery and eliminate overnight service for the first time in 40 years. From left are Donahoe, John Berry, director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Phillip Herr, director of physical infrastructure issues for the Government Accountability Office, and Thomas Levy, chief actuary of The Segal Company, serving as a consultant on postal employee benefits. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  •  -
    Posted: 11/16/2011 8:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 28, 2011 file photo, actress Sharon Stone arrives for a U.S. Postal Service first-day-of-issue dedication ceremony for the Gregory Peck forever stamp at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, Calif. Stone, famous for provocative performances, is playing the mother of another actress also famous for provocative performances. Stone, 53, says she will play Linda Lovelace's mom in the biopic ?Inferno: A Linda Lovelace Story.? (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, file)
  •  -
    Posted: 11/15/2011 6:30:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The U.S. Postal Service releases a financial update expected to show just under $10 billion in losses for the last year as a weak economy and increased use of the Internet drove down mail volume. Donahoe has warned that the postal service will default on payments owed to the federal government, including $5.5 billion due this Friday for retiree health benefits, and faces a shutdown next fall if Congress does not move swiftly and aggressively to fix the ailing agency?s long-term money problems. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
  •  - A United States Postal Service poster displays the new USA First Class postage stamp bearing an image of the Statue of Liberty in Washington

    A United States Postal Service poster displays the new USA First Class postage stamp bearing an image of the Statue of Liberty in Washington

    Posted: 10/18/2011 4:28:49 PM EST
    A United States Postal Service poster displays the new USA First Class postage stamp bearing an image of the Statue of Liberty among others at a USPS post office in Washington, April 15, 2011. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang
  •  -
    Posted: 10/13/2011 3:25:48 PM EST
    This undated handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows the Kwanzaa holiday stamp. The post office is set for the holidays. The agency unveiled two new Christmas stamps Thursday, and is following on Friday with new stamps to commemorate the Jewish holiday Hanukkah and the African-American celebration Kwanzaa. (AP Photo/USPS
  •  -
    Posted: 10/13/2011 3:25:48 PM EST
    This undated handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows the Hanukkah holiday stamp. The post office is set for the holidays. The agency unveiled two new Christmas stamps Thursday, and is following on Friday with new stamps to commemorate the Jewish holiday Hanukkah and the African-American celebration Kwanzaa. (AP Photo/USPS
  •  -
    Posted: 10/13/2011 3:25:48 PM EST
    This undated handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows this year's traditional "Madonna and Child" Christmas stamp. The post office is set for the holidays. The stamp features a painting by the 16th century artist Raphael which now hangs in the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. The agency unveiled two new Christmas stamps Thursday, and is following on Friday with new stamps to commemorate the Jewish holiday Hanukkah and the African-American celebration Kwanzaa. (AP Photo/USPS)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/13/2011 3:25:48 PM EST
    This undated handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows the four modern holiday stamps featuring four 1950s style Christmas tree ornaments. The post office is set for the holidays. The agency unveiled two new Christmas stamps Thursday, and is following on Friday with new stamps to commemorate the Jewish holiday Hanukkah and the African-American celebration Kwanzaa. (AP Photo/USPS
  •  -
    Posted: 10/5/2011 12:20:46 AM EST
    Apple Scott Forstall, senior vice president for iOS mobile software, talks about a new greeting cards app during announcement at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. Apple, which revealed a new app Tuesday that lets users create and mail greeting cards with their iPhones, might want to consider crafting its own condolence card for traditional greeting card companies. A brief mention the $2.99 app that lets people design and send greeting cards through the postal service sent the stocks of greeting card companies tumbling. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/3/2011 1:40:47 PM EST
    This handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows a postage stamp honoring Mark Twain. If Twain were alive today would he tweet: "OMG, reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated, LOL"? When Twain did read his premature obituary, he sent a letter assuring friends the report was overblown. But when was the last time you got a personal letter in the mail? If you live in a typical American household, it's been a while. According to the post office's annual survey, the average household gets one personal letter about every seven weeks. (AP Photo/USPS)